A new free world is locked in outdated 20th-century systems

A new free world is locked in outdated 20th-century systems

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Donald Trump walks past police in Lafayette Park before making an address outside St. John’s Church near the White House, June 1, 2020. (AP Photo)

It was clear already from the middle of the 18th century that the US was going to be a much larger power than many of the existing empires of that time, built on the principles of freedom and the basic human incentive for wealth acquisition in three steps: Initiate, work, earn. This month’s presidential election proved once again that this spirit is still beating in the heart of the “Nation of Freedom.”
It is worth noting that Republicans were once considered the Industrial Capitalist Party, but since that time the economy has substantially changed and, with it, the party demographics as a whole.
The Democrats, who have become a kind of social-revolutionary party planning to bring about a centralized revolution of a planned economy and a tax increase, are supported by big multinational corporations. The Republicans under Donald Trump, however, are increasingly supported by the lower class of whites and blue-collar workers.
Although Joe Biden was elected, the final results of the election have not yet been called. However, it is already clear that it does not resemble the opinion polls. The polling companies made a serious mistake; the pollsters were wrong, very wrong. Almost all the professional institutes that conducted scientific polls missed the election results by a large margin.
Hopes for a “blue Democratic wave” shattered off the coast of Florida. There was almost a draw. In seven states, the gap consists of thousands of votes at most. In those states, there are allegations of improper handling of ballot papers, and perhaps even forgeries, in Biden’s favor. In any case, it is a very narrow victory.
Unfortunately, both sides were relying on a similar strategy. Trump and Biden were relying on friends from their respective parties within the swing states to avoid exercises that will help the opponent in the count and perhaps lend a hand to exercises that will help them.
In Arizona and Georgia, Trump’s campaign relied on the governors’ support to at least prevent forgeries in Biden’s favor. In Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan, Biden’s campaign was backed by Democratic governors and state secretaries working to increase the number of votes in favor of their party.
And at least in the case of Pennsylvania, the secretary of state (the trust for the approval of the election results) issued announcements on the eve of the election giving the impression that he was settling matters in Biden’s favor. On Tuesday night, the governor issued a similar statement.
Both sides claim the opponent is trying to steal the election. The only difference is that Biden does not have to say it himself because the media is mobilized to attack Trump for him. Trump, on the other hand, needs to run his own media campaign in person. In doing so, we actually see the continued mobilization of the media for Biden and against Trump.
The American media attacked Trump when he declared victory on Wednesday morning and blamed Biden’s campaign for deception. Yet no one had a word of criticism when Biden’s campaign declared victory and accused Trump of trying to undermine the results.
But it is not over until it is over, and as these lines are being written Trump is determined to fight, with the results indicating not very large gaps. His legacy, “Trumpism,” is guaranteed in any scenario. Even if he does not win at the end of the road, the legacy he built in his first term is guaranteed. Republicans will take care to preserve his achievements.
If Biden becomes the 46th president, even his supporters will admit that this is because half of America mobilized with unprecedented intensity against Trump, in part due to the negative image attached to the latter by the establishment and the media. This despite the fact that masses of voters actually expressed support for Trump’s economic conduct.
We have witnessed the most dramatic US election, but this did not happen by accident. If we analyze our lives in the new free world, we quickly learn that we all operate in a very logical way that is dictated by the framework of outdated 20th-century systems on one hand, and by new innovations and technologies on the other.
For example, we live under a constitution, but it is what the judges say it is. An old street joke says: “What’s the difference between a good lawyer and a great lawyer? A good lawyer knows the law. A great lawyer knows/appoints the judge.”
This joke is unfortunately not funny. And as appears from endless research and proposals for judicial reforms, the structure of 21st-century judiciaries in most Western countries enables serious gaps, defaults and inequalities. Those inequalities push those who suffer to a long list of reactions, including violence and crime, and further divide nation states into tribal societies that are then used by opportunistic politicians to gain power, and so the chaos continues.
Biden proudly announced that he will govern as an American even though he belongs to the Democratic Party, and he called for “a time of healing.” This rhetoric summarizes the most important issue of the election.
The US and the free world need a president who serves the interests of all Americans and citizens of the world. The US and the world need a president who listens to all and creates systems that support advancement toward greater equalities. Citizens who work in the oil industry in Pennsylvania cannot be discarded like a bottle cap that is not needed anymore, and the system must care for their needs and challenges.
At the same time, programs and clear legislation must be implemented in order to support the advancement of poor African Americans, and to create further opportunities for women who feel discriminated against and mistreated. Such legislation should not hurt men or the “other,” but rather create a systematic framework that better equalizes opportunities for all citizens.

It is not over until it is over, and as these lines are being written Trump is determined to fight, with the results indicating not very large gaps. His legacy, ‘Trumpism,’ is guaranteed in any scenario.

Mark C. Donfried

Politicians who would like to use diplomatic means and language (“political correctness”) should do that, but without attacking politicians who see it as a waste of time and resources and prefer more practical solutions to problems.
Controversial issues such as abortion or gun control should be debated and checked within a framework of special mutual committees that will be able to find proper compromises to satisfy those who either support or oppose these policies.
Proper legislation should be put in place to update many of the frameworks of systems of operational daily life in the US, which can then be followed by other countries in order to enable all citizens of the world to understand these compromises and what is allowed and not allowed.
Only then will citizens of the US and the free world be able to see a clearer path that leads to a more united society. These inequalities that have existed in society for centuries must be corrected in order to decrease tribalism.
Looking at history, every time society has chosen a compromise it leads its people toward prosperity and peace, but allowing inequalities to deepen and divide for too long without a proper remedy has led to bloody conflicts and destruction, which we hope can be avoided in the US.
America has been living in an evolving tribal society of inequalities for too long, and the West has been observing this devolution decade by decade. Let us put a stop to this and, as Biden calls for, enter “a time of healing.”

  • Mark C. Donfried is director general at the Berlin-based Institute for Cultural Diplomacy.
Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not necessarily reflect Arab News' point-of-view