Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh

Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh
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Eng. Saleh Al-Jasser, Saudi minister of transportation, officially opens the facility at SAL. (AN photo by Yazeed Alsamrani)
Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh
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Al-Jasser, and Dr. Hisham Al-Jadhey, CEO of the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA) taking a tour of the SAL facility. (AN photo by Yazeed Alsamrani)
Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh
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Saleh Al-Jasser, minister of transportation, centre, tours the facility. (AN photo by Yazeed Alsamrani)
Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh
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Saleh Al-Jasser, minister of transportation, left, tours the facility. (AN photo by Yazeed Alsamrani)
Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh
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the Saudi Logistics Company (SAL) CEO Omar Hariri talks during the press conference. (AN photo by Yazeed Alsamrani)
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Updated 26 November 2020

Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh

Modern cargo facility to handle medicines opened in Riyadh

RIYADH: Saudi Minister of Transport Saleh bin Nasser Al-Jasser on Wednesday inaugurated a new medical supplies and warehousing facility at King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh.
The Saudi Arabian Logistics (SAL) company’s state-of-the-art center in Cargo Village will handle medicines, related items, and house cooling warehouses.
SAL CEO Omar Hariri told a press conference that the opening coincided with the implementation of global measures on the import and export of vaccines to fight the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.
The international efforts required “putting all the operational capabilities in a state of maximum readiness” in coordination with the health authorities, he said.
An area of 5,000 square meters will be used for medicine shipments and perishable materials, of which 900 square meters will be the delivery area. The new cooling areas are three times bigger than the previous ones.
The project contains four gates, three of which are for perishable materials and one for medical supplies.

FASTFACTS

•The project contains four gates, three of which are for perishable materials and one for medical supplies.

• An area of 5,000 square meters will be used for medicine shipments and perishable materials.

• The refrigeration capacity of the facility is 365,000 tons per year.

• The center has also been equipped with 60 devices to monitor temperatures and humidity levels every five minutes.

The refrigeration capacity of the facility is 365,000 tons per year contained in 13 refrigerated warehouses for perishable and medical supplies coming to Riyadh.
The center has also been equipped with 60 devices to monitor temperatures and humidity levels every five minutes using cloud systems to store and monitor information certified by the International Air Transport Association.
The total screening area covers 650 square meters at a temperature of 17 degrees and has a refrigerated medical container loading area with a capacity of up to 20 containers, as well as thermal isolation and temperature-preserving products.
Dr. Hisham Al-Jadhey, CEO of the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA), said the facility met international standards. “The SFDA has distinguished Saudi scientists, who work to review the standards and specifications to ensure the effectiveness and safety of vaccines,” he added.
Al-Jadhey told Arab News that the SFDA had worked on three aspects in relation to vaccines. “The first aspect is to ensure the effectiveness of the vaccine and by looking at clinical and pre-clinical studies.
“The second is to make sure the vaccine is safe by looking at the studies that have been submitted to use the trials conducted on the vaccine.
“And the third aspect, we check the quality of the vaccine in terms of the presence of defects, manufacturing capabilities, and the quality of the factories,” he said.


Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
Updated 16 January 2021

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
  • It will go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority

RIYADH: Preclinical studies on the first Saudi vaccine against COVID-19 have been completed.

Professor of epidemiology Dr. Iman Almansour, who heads the team of researchers working on the vaccine at the Institute for Research and Medical Consultations (IRMC), affiliated with Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU), confirmed to Arab News on Friday that the studies were complete, and said clinical trials would begin as soon as “the proper approvals” had been given.

She did not specify when that is expected to happen.

The Ministry of Education is financing the team’s project. The team’s research paper has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmaceuticals.

The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen.

Dr. Iman Almansour, professor of epidemiology

According to the published paper, the vaccine has so far proven effective, when used on animals, in eliciting antibodies that will target the virus. “The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen,” Dr. Almansour explained.

Dr. Turki Almugaiteeb, director of Healthcare and Life Sciences at RPD Innovations, which runs the National Vaccine and Biomanufacturing Center, told Arab News: “There is a great focus on the results of medical research because of the pandemic. Research can play a great role in developing a vaccine that can be adopted and further developed in the future. We can say that the Kingdom has a strong infrastructure, which can help produce and manufacture a national vaccine.”

Both Almugaiteeb and Almansour stressed that the experimental vaccine will need to go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority.

Prof. Nasser Al-Aqeeli, the deputy minister of education for research and innovation, said the ministry supported programs at the Kingdom’s universities with more than SR500 million ($133.3 million) in 2020.