Saudi project empowers 500 orphans in Yemen

Saudi project empowers 500 orphans in Yemen
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Saudi project empowers 500 orphans in Yemen
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Updated 28 November 2020

Saudi project empowers 500 orphans in Yemen

Saudi project empowers 500 orphans in Yemen
  • 100 women will receive 60 hours of training in sewing and embroidery while 75 male and female trainees will take part in mobile maintenance courses

MARIB: A Saudi-backed training program designed to help 500 orphans and family members in Yemen set up their own businesses has moved into its second phase.
The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center is implementing the Maharati Biyadi project which aims to improve the livelihoods of the scheme’s beneficiaries in Yemen’s Marib governorate.
Under the latest edition of the initiative, 100 women will receive 60 hours of training in sewing and embroidery while 75 male and female trainees will take part in mobile maintenance courses over a period of 160 hours.


World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit

World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit
Updated 23 sec ago

World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit

World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit
  • The “Health is Wealth” roundtable aims to develop tangible solutions to global problems
  • The Future Investment Initiative Institute is a new foundation aimed at making a positive impact on humanity

RIYADH: World leaders will gather to discuss how the world can prepare for future pandemics and drive solutions to global issues at a roundtable hosted by the Future Investment Initiative Institute on Tuesday.

The “Health is Wealth” roundtable will be attended by heads of states, UN ambassadors, corporate leaders and government officials, and will see the Saudi-based institute launch its Global Infectious Diseases Index.

From disparate investment in health to inequalities in access, the FII Institute’s roundtable aims to “address these issues and drive tangible solutions,” the organization said.

Institute CEO Richard Attias said: “The pandemic uncovered some harsh realities; the global economy shrunk by about 4 percent, mobility came to an abrupt standstill, millions of people were pushed into extreme poverty, and weaknesses in our global health systems were exposed.

“For every $1 invested in health, the world could see an economic return between $2 and $4 with developing countries benefiting from the highest returns,” Attias continued. “Now is the moment to charter a path toward more equitable, sustainable, and resilient health systems.”

Speakers at Tuesday’s roundtable will include FII Institute Chairman H.E. Yasir Al-Rumayyan, who is from Saudi Arabia, as well as World Trade Organization Director-General Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, UN Refugee Agency Goodwill Ambassador Nomzamo Mbatha, and US TB Alliance President and CEO Dr. Mel Spigelman.

The roundtable is timed to coincide with the UN General Assembly, which is taking place throughout September — and top of the agenda for the world leaders gathering in New York has been the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

The UN has called for multilateral solutions and international cooperation to address the pandemic, and the “Health is Wealth” roundtable is anticipated to plug into that conversation in a hybrid digital and in-person meeting.

The FII Institute is a new global nonprofit foundation based in Riyadh that invests in projects that “turn ideas into real-world solutions.” It focuses investment on five areas — sustainability, healthcare, education, artificial intelligence, and robotics — to address the most pressing issues.


Who’s Who: Sultan Bader Al-Otaibi, CEO of Dur Hospitality

Who’s Who: Sultan Bader Al-Otaibi, CEO of Dur Hospitality
Updated 51 min 59 sec ago

Who’s Who: Sultan Bader Al-Otaibi, CEO of Dur Hospitality

Who’s Who: Sultan Bader Al-Otaibi, CEO of Dur Hospitality

Sultan Bader Al-Otaibi, CEO of Dur Hospitality, is an inspirational visionary and impactful leader within the Middle East’s hospitality industry, with a proven track record of excellence in finance and asset management.

With more than 20 years’ experience in various managerial and leadership roles at Dur Hospitality, Al-Otaibi has stood out for his numerous achievements. Having formerly held the position of vice president of property and assets, he demonstrated his far-sighted strategic planning and astute decision-making by maximizing the returns of the company’s real estate asset portfolio.

As general manager of Makarem Hospitality Group, Al-Otaibi oversaw the overall management of the group’s properties (hotels and resorts) to guarantee seamless operations, harnessing his organizational and team management skills to oversee world-class hospitality standards.

Recognized for his accomplishments in the industry, Al-Otaibi formerly ranked 25th on the Hotelier Middle East Magazine Power 50 list. He is also known for his active participation and contributions as a member of the tourism committee at the Riyadh Chamber of Commerce.

Al-Otaibi has been distinguished as a successful and influential figure at Dur Hospitality for his outstanding capabilities and vast experience in the field, leading by example and steering the company to new heights to achieve the strategic objectives of the company in line with the goals of Saudi Vision 2030.

Driven by his passion for the hospitality industry, Al-Otaibi enriched his background in the field by undertaking a master’s degree in international hospitality management from the Emirates Academy of Hospitality Management, after receiving a bachelor’s degree in accounting from King Saud University. In pursuit of higher education, he continued to study at Cornell University, an Ivy League research university in Ithaca, New York.


Danish embassy celebrates the Global Goals World Cup Saudi Arabia 2021 Initiative

Danish embassy celebrates the Global Goals World Cup Saudi Arabia 2021 Initiative
Updated 18 September 2021

Danish embassy celebrates the Global Goals World Cup Saudi Arabia 2021 Initiative

Danish embassy celebrates the Global Goals World Cup Saudi Arabia 2021 Initiative
  • Twenty-eight teams from all over Saudi Arabia participated in the Global Goals World Cup (GGWCUP)
  • UN Goal 13 was chosen by the Danish embassy’s team, Green Tornado, who have been working on green initiatives in Riyadh

RIYADH: The Royal Danish Embassy in Riyadh recently celebrated the Global Goals World Cup (GGWCUP) initiative, a women football tournament taking place for the first time in Riyadh this year.

Twenty-eight teams from all over Saudi Arabia came to play this weekend at the tournament.

The Saudi sports minister and Sports for All Federation are the co-sponsors and organizers, along with Majken Gilmarti, the Danish co-founder and CEO at the GGWCUP.

The main goal of the tournament is to encourage women across the country to participate in sports and boost health.

Described as the social good world cup, the tournament is asking each team to apply one of the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

Danish Ambassador Ole E. Moesby hosted the lunch gathering at the Embassy to discuss climate action, SDG 13, among guests and representatives from the UN and the GGWCUP.

Goal 13 was chosen by the Embassy’s female team called Green Tornado, who have been working on their green initiative over the previous months around Riyadh.   

Moesby highlighted Green Tornado’s hard work throughout the previous six months to achieve their goals.

“They have planted flowers and trees, they have collected garbage, and they have set an example of what you can get out of it and also being part of a team that's called Green Tornado,” Moesby told Arab News.

Gilmarti told Arab News that hosting the event for the first time in Saudi Arabia was magical: “Seeing and getting to work with the Sport for All Federation and their team is amazing. They are pro in how they are doing it, and they are open-minded to the whole approach.”

She added: “We create communities where everybody thrives and have a great life.”

Gilmarti said that the winning team in this year’s tournament will be playing in their annual global finals in Iceland.

“We play in November as part of the global forum, the women political leaders forum. So, we invite women, political leaders to get to know about the teams.”

Lamia Bahian, a board member of the Women’s Football Federation, told Arab News that her focus is developing women’s football in Saudi Arabia starting from ground zero, building a community that can support the sport.

“Now we have our regional training center, which is going to be activated. And two weeks from now, leagues will start very soon.” She said.

Bahian said it was “great to be part of that event and see it happening in your own eyes and on-ground, that’s a feeling that I don't think I can describe.”


Saudi Arabia announces 5 more COVID-19 deaths

Saudi Arabia announces 5 more COVID-19 deaths
Updated 18 September 2021

Saudi Arabia announces 5 more COVID-19 deaths

Saudi Arabia announces 5 more COVID-19 deaths
  • The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom has increased to 535,450
  • A total of 8,656 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia announced five deaths from COVID-19 and 68 new infections on Saturday.

Of the new cases, 20 were recorded in Makkah, 17 in Riyadh, seven in the Eastern Province, five in Madinah, four in Asir, three in Jazan, three in Tabuk, two in the Northern Borders region, two in Al-Jouf, one in Najran, and one in Hail.

The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom increased to 535,450 after 77 more patients recovered from the virus.

A total of 8,656 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far.

Over 40.5 million doses of a coronavirus vaccine have been administered in the Kingdom to date.


Czech Republic hopes to establish ‘strategic partnership’ with Saudi Arabia, Czech FM tells Arab News

Czech Republic hopes to establish ‘strategic partnership’ with Saudi Arabia, Czech FM tells Arab News
Updated 18 September 2021

Czech Republic hopes to establish ‘strategic partnership’ with Saudi Arabia, Czech FM tells Arab News

Czech Republic hopes to establish ‘strategic partnership’ with Saudi Arabia, Czech FM tells Arab News
  • Jakub Kulhanek says his country and KSA have much to offer each other in a number of fields
  • Czech companies see “great potential in delivering knowhow and technologies to” KSA mega-projects

Last week, Jakub Kulhanek, foreign minister of the Czech Republic, paid his first official visit to Saudi Arabia to hold meetings with Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan and Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel Al-Jubeir.

In an exclusive interview with Arab News, Kulhanek spoke on the discussions the two sides held on bilateral relations and the means to enhance them, as well as regional and international issues, notably Afghanistan.

“My official visit to Saudi Arabia lasted just some 30 hours, and the only city I visited was Riyadh,” he told Arab News. “For me, there is an obligation to come back once again in the future and enjoy visiting Jeddah, the futuristic megacity of NEOM and other famous places of interest.”

Q. How would you describe your meetings with Saudi officials during your just concluded visit?

A. First of all, I would like to thank the Saudi government and all my counterparts whom I was privileged to meet for their generosity and time they spent on preparing our visit. They set up a wonderful program. We had insightful meetings, and I am confident that we have together managed to take relations between our countries one level higher.

During my meeting with Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan, we reassured each other that our relations are friendly and that the general standing of our countries is in many ways complementary. We have much to offer each other in areas of trade, scientific cooperation, the energy sector, mining and the security industry.

The Kingdom, together with the UAE, belong to our top five trade partners in the Middle East. That is something we can build on, something we are obligated to develop. And that is also the reason why I was accompanied by a trade mission of more than 20 distinguished business people from various industrial fields.

At the same time, our cooperation is not limited only to business. We have a long run tradition of cooperation in the health sector. Many Saudis study at Czech universities. Saudi citizens are frequent fliers when it comes to our spa resorts.

With Prince Faisal, we agreed on the need to revitalize the Czech-Saudi Joint Commission, which has not met since 2011. It is a useful platform bringing together representatives of committed ministries to discuss specific issues of mutual interest.

Czech FM Jakub Kulhanek and his delegation visiting Diriyah heritage site in Riyadh. (Supplied)

Q. Did you discuss political cooperation with Saudi Arabia on regional and development issues?

A. It goes without saying that visiting the Kingdom and meeting its leaders gave me a unique chance to discuss issues of international politics and global issues alike. We agreed, both with Foreign Minister Prince Faisal and Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel Al-Jubeir, my fellow Georgetown alumnus, that we want to formalize regular consultations between our foreign affairs ministries. We hope for an establishment of a strategic partnership in the near future.

We also shared with our Saudi hosts the need to intensify contacts at the highest political level. I hope that the foreign minister will come in the near future for a visit to the Czech Republic. I was also glad to hand over an invitation for Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to visit the Czech Republic.

Czech FM Jakub Kulhanek with Saudi Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel Al-Jubeir at Diriyah heritage site in Riyadh. (Supplied)

Q. What kind of cross-investment flows do you envisage between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Czech Republic?

A. Thank you very much for that question, since I truly believe there is a great potential for bigger Saudi investments. Over the last 30 years, the Czech Republic has attracted many foreign investors, from both portfolio and green foreign direct investments, from Europe, the US and Asia.

So far, the Gulf investors have been slightly lagging behind, though we are already seeing that some of them are starting to discover existing opportunities for investments in Central Europe. Therefore, we plan on organizing an investment forum for representatives of sovereign funds from the Gulf region, at which they will have the chance to meet managers of foremost Czech financial groups.

The Czech-GCC Investment Forum will be held between May 30 and June 4, 2022, shoulder to shoulder with the presidency of the Czech Republic in the Council of the EU in the second half of 2022.

I would like to invite the managers of the Public Investment Fund and other important financial groups in the Kingdom to take part in the event.

FM Jakub Kulhanek wants Saudi investment companies to participate in the Czech-GCC Investment Forum in his country next year.  (Supplied)

Q. Do you see a greater role for Czech technology companies in the Kingdom’s ongoing development projects under Vision 2030? In what sectors would these mainly be and what impact would they have?

A. In my opinion, the ambitious Vision 2030, its goals and the projects it leans upon, provide Czech companies with numerous opportunities, mostly on subcontracting basis. We are truly interested in facilitating the access of the Czech companies to the tenders floated by Saudi state-owned enterprises. We see a great potential in delivering Czech knowhow, technologies and high-tech products to the government's megaprojects, be it NEOM, the Red Sea Resort, or the Green Riyadh initiative.

We are confident that Saudi enterprises, such as Saudi Aramco, SABIC and many others, would also benefit from it.

Q. Before your departure for the Gulf, you said that the Czech Republic will not recognize the Taliban. Can you kindly elaborate on your statement?

A. I think we have to distinguish carefully between two separate things. The first is communication with the Taliban, who are no doubt the new rulers of the country. It is clear that the EU and NATO will not avoid interacting with them just so that we can provide the Afghan people with the humanitarian aid that they are in dire need of now.

I am not talking about high-level and official contacts, but communication at the working level will have to take place. Another thing is official recognition of the Taliban government; great caution is necessary here. I believe the Taliban are far from fulfilling their promises. The media are informing us how they are behaving in the streets of Afghan cities and what atrocities are being committed.

FM Jakub Kulhanek says Czech companies are also ready to participate in Saudi Arabia's Vision 2030 programs. (AFP file photo)

Q. You have also said your country will accept the unhappy reality “as it is” that the Taliban are “the new masters of Afghanistan.” Can you deal with the Taliban without implicitly granting it recognition?

A. The EU and NATO must be pragmatic and accept the new reality in Afghanistan. Nevertheless, that does not mean that we will give up our effort to put pressure on the Taliban to maintain at least something of what has been achieved in Afghanistan over the past 20 years.

I am talking now, in particular, about the rights of women and girls. So yes, the international community can negotiate with the Taliban over that and, depending on the outcome, maybe the question of official recognition of the Taliban government would become topical in the future.

Q. What leverage does the EU have over the Taliban in your view? Are the Czech Republic and EU positions totally convergent?

A. The position of the Czech Republic is fully in line with EU policy. As you know, just recently EU foreign ministers agreed at their informal meeting in Slovenia that any substantive engagement with the Taliban is only possible if some conditions are met: Respect for human rights, in particular women’s rights, and the establishment of a representative inclusive government, are among them.

Afghan women's rights defenders and civil activists protest in Kabul on Sept. 3, 2021 to call on the Taliban for the preservation of their achievements and education. (REUTERS/File Photo)

I am not convinced that the Taliban would meet them sometime soon. We understand the necessity of keeping the EU’s presence in Kabul but the Czech Republic had to evacuate our diplomats and Afghan facilitators.

Communication with the Taliban is necessary, as we must try to influence the way they will rule the country, at least to prevent humanitarian and migration crises. The Taliban will seek international recognition and resources — that is our main leverage now.

Q. International organizations with offices in Afghanistan have repeatedly warned of an impending humanitarian disaster. There is rising hunger, little cash and very little health care. How can the international community help Afghans?

A. We are aware of the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Afghanistan. An international donors’ conference was held in Geneva last Monday under the auspices of the UN. The international community, including the Czech Republic, has pledged to continue humanitarian aid. The Czech Republic has declared its readiness to increase its contribution to humanitarian and development projects in Afghanistan and neighboring countries.