What We Are Reading Today: Saving Freedom by Joe Scarborough

What We Are Reading Today: Saving Freedom by Joe Scarborough
Short Url
Updated 30 November 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Saving Freedom by Joe Scarborough

What We Are Reading Today: Saving Freedom by Joe Scarborough

In Saving Freedom, Joe Scarborough focuses on former US President Harry Truman’s foreign policy achievements. 

Scarborough brings a deft touch to his storytelling and analysis of Harry Truman’s foreign policy successes. 

“He translates this well to the challenges that remain now for a new American administration,” said a review in goodreads.com.

“The story of the passage of the Truman doctrine is an inspiring tale of American leadership, bipartisan unity, and courage in the face of an antidemocratic threat,” i added. 

Saving Freedom highlights a pivotal moment of the 20th Century, a turning point where patriotic Americans worked together to defeat tyranny.

Truman had been vice president for less than three months when then-President Franklin Roosevelt died. Suddenly inaugurated the leader of the free world, the plainspoken Truman candidly told reporters he, “felt like the moon, the stars, and all the planets had fallen on me.”

Scarborough is an American cable news and talk radio host, lawyer, author, and former politician. 


What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
Updated 25 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

In Blink, Malcolm Gladwell revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant — in the blink of an eye — that actually aren’t as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?

In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple, the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball and the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. 

Blink reveals that great decision-makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of “thin-slicing” — filtering the very
few factors that matter from a number of variables.