What We Are Reading Today: Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers

What We Are Reading Today: Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers
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Updated 06 December 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers

What We Are Reading Today: Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers

This is an eye-opening book on how the intersection of poverty and racism result in terrible living conditions in Alabama, US. 

“This book is fascinating on multiple levels,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

Author Catherine Coleman Flowers is an environmental activist. Her book spotlights an unpleasant and complicated problem — the lack of proper waste sanitation in rural America — and the phenomenal toll it takes on public health and dignity.

“Waste is written with warmth, grace and clarity. Its straightforward faith in the possibility of building a better world, from the ground up, is contagious,” said Anna Clark in a review for The New York Times.

“As eye-opening as it is as a chronicle of the rural sanitation crisis, Waste is at least as much the autobiography of an environmental justice advocate,” said the review. 

Flowers “shares the extraordinary story of her own life, in all its detours, leaps of faith, luck, strange turns, hard work and her ever-rising social consciousness.”

This book tells a story of environmental racism and poverty.


What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
Updated 25 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

In Blink, Malcolm Gladwell revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant — in the blink of an eye — that actually aren’t as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?

In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple, the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball and the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. 

Blink reveals that great decision-makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of “thin-slicing” — filtering the very
few factors that matter from a number of variables.