Gigi Hadid teases fans with glimpse of baby girl

Gigi Hadid welcomed her baby girl with Zayn Malik in September.
Gigi Hadid welcomed her baby girl with Zayn Malik in September.
Short Url
Updated 08 January 2021

Gigi Hadid teases fans with glimpse of baby girl

Gigi Hadid welcomed her baby girl with Zayn Malik in September.

DUBAI: Part-Palestinian model Gigi Hadid rarely offers glimpses of her newborn child with former One Direction singer Zayn Malik, but on Sunday, the 25-year-old shared an adorable, albeit subtle, sneak peak of her three-month old daughter on Instagram.

In the snap, the model’s baby girl is seen wearing a leopard-print sweater while she cradles her mother's index finger.

“My girl!” wrote Hadid alongside the sweet image.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

Extremely private when it comes to her newborn, Hadid rarely shares images of her daughter whom she welcomed in September.

Though Hadid, who was born in California to a Dutch mother and a Palestinian father, welcomed her first child with longtime partner Zayn Malik back in September, the 25-year-old has yet to share a photo of her baby girl’s face or her name with the public. 

In fact, over the holidays, Hadid took part in Instagram’s viral “Show Me a Picture Of” challenge, clarifying at the beginning of the challenge that fans shouldn’t bother asking to see a picture of her daughter.

However, Hadid has opted for quick glimpses and tidbits into her new life as a mom, including a tour of the baby’s nursery via Instagram Stories. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid)

In celebration of Halloween, the model shared the family’s first photo together on social media, and last month, the catwalk star shared a series of intimate Instagram snaps with her 62.4 million followers, including one that showed her cradling her newborn.

 “A whole new kind of busy & tired but she’s da bestie so she got Christmas decorations early (sic),” Hadid wrote, also showcasing her festive Christmas decorations ahead of the holiday.

Meanwhile, on Christmas Day, the older sister of Bella Hadid did post two new photos of her newborn, though her face wasn’t visible in either picture. 

The new parents have also kept the infant’s name under wraps, but according to E! News, the newborn’s moniker is “unique.”

In December, some fans were convinced that Taylor Swift revealed the couple’s baby’s name in the song “Dorothea” from her ninth album, “Evermore.”

“Y’all hear me out. My best friend just cracked something, I guess. ‘August’ is track 8 on ‘Folkore’ and Gigi has posted a picture on Instagram captioning ‘August, waiting for our girl,’” a dedicated fan shared on Twitter.

“The track 8 of evermore is ‘Dorothea.’ SO WHAT IF GIGI’S BABY’S NAME IS DOROTHEA? (sic)” the sleuthing conspiracy theorist added.

Despite fan speculation, unnamed sources told TMZ that the baby’s name is not Dorothea.

 

Arabic calligraphy: Ancient craft, modern art
For the Saudi Ministry of Culture's Year of Arabic Calligraphy in 2020/21, we take an in-depth look at how the craft has developed from ancient to modern times.

Enter


keywords

 


What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo
Updated 16 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

From the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race, a history of white male America and a scathing indictment of what it has cost us.
After the election of Donald Trump, and the escalation of white male rage and increased hostility toward immigrants that came with him, New York Times-bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo found herself in conversation with Americans around the country, pondering one central question: How did we get here?
Oluo answers that question by pinpointing white men’s deliberate efforts to subvert women, people of color, and the disenfranchised. Through research and interviews, Oluo investigates the backstory of America’s growth, from immigrant migration to our national ethos around ingenuity, from the shaping of economic policy to the protection of sociopolitical movements that fortify male power. In the end, she shows how white men have long maintained a stranglehold on leadership and sorely undermined the pursuit of happiness for all, according to a review at goodreads.com.