The UAE is one of the most expensive countries for beauty, new report says

The new study looked at the most expensive countries to buy the five most iconic beauty products, which includes Chanel No. 5. Instagram/@chanelofficial
The new study looked at the most expensive countries to buy the five most iconic beauty products, which includes Chanel No. 5. Instagram/@chanelofficial
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Updated 12 January 2021

The UAE is one of the most expensive countries for beauty, new report says

The new study looked at the most expensive countries to buy the five most iconic beauty products, which includes Chanel No. 5. Instagram/@chanelofficial

DUBAI: A brand new bottle of Chanel No. 5 Eau De Parfum costs $172 in Canada. But to acquire that same perfume in the United Arab Emirates, you have to fork out over $185, according to new data by beauty price comparison website Cosmetify. MAC Cosmetics’s Retro Matte Lipstick, meanwhile, can be had for $19 in the United States or $26 in the UAE.

The new report by Cosmetify aims to highlight the economic discrepancies when it comes to purchasing beauty products by looking at the most expensive countries to buy the five most iconic beauty products — Chanel No. 5 Eau De Parfum, MAC Cosmetics Retro Matte Lipstick, Estée Lauder Double Wear Stay-in-Place Makeup SPF10, Anastasia Beverley Hills DIPBROW Pomade and the NARS Sheer Glow Foundation.

According to the research, the UAE is the fourth most expensive country to purchase beauty, while China is the most pricy. Thailand and Taiwan are third and fourth, while Denmark rounds out the list at number five. 

Still, according to a study by Research & Markets, the UAE cosmetics market is forecast to cross $3 billion by 2025.

The reason for this, states the study, is “increasing demand from the youth population, growing adoption of western culture and lifestyle and an increasing number of beauty salons across the country.”

Meanwhile, those who wish to stock up their makeup bag for less can consider traveling  to Canada, the United States, Mexico or Malaysia, which boast the world’s lowest prices when it comes to purchasing cosmetics.


UK initiative returns with MENA art in focus

The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom. (The Arab British Centre)
The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom. (The Arab British Centre)
Updated 21 January 2021

UK initiative returns with MENA art in focus

The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom. (The Arab British Centre)
  • Program will feature established artists with links to region
  • Organizers emphasize need for cultural community amid pandemic

LONDON: Artists, actors and writers from across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) will take part in the latest instalment of an initiative set up to provide a sense of cultural community during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Arab British Centre and MENA Arts UK will collaborate to deliver a series of online talks by established creators that will give the public a chance to ask them questions directly, and the creators an opportunity to reflect on their work during the pandemic.

The Friday Hangout: MENA Arts UK Takeover will begin on Feb. 5 when Sally El-Hosaini, a director who has won awards for her film “My Brother The Devil” at London, Berlin and Sundance film festivals, will speak to audiences via Zoom.

In the following weeks, award-winning writers and actors — including BAFTA winner Amir El-Masry — will also take part in the program.

This year’s program is the second in the Hangout series, the first of which was introduced early in the pandemic in 2020.

MENA Arts UK was formed last year to celebrate Britain-based artists with a connection to the region.

“We’ve been overwhelmed by the incredible response to our launch last year, and are so excited to be partnering with the Arab British Centre,” said Laura Hanna, a member of MENA Arts UK’s steering group.

“This Takeover means we can create and open up conversations around the work of MENA+ artists for a wider audience.”

The Arab British Centre is a cultural organization that regularly hosts and takes part in events celebrating and fostering cultural connections between the UK and the Arab world.

“We are delighted to be bringing back our Friday Hangout series with our friends at MENA Arts UK,” said Amani Hassan, acting executive director of the Arab British Centre.

 

“As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to severely impact life here in the UK, creating spaces where we can come together for a moment of community, culture and creativity is as essential now as it was back in March last year.”