Dwayne Johnson, DiCaprio headline Netflix’s 2021 movies

Dwayne Johnson, DiCaprio headline Netflix’s 2021 movies
The Netflix slate includes “Red Notice” starring Dwayne Johnson and “Don’t Look Up” starring Leonardo DiCaprio. (Composite image)
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Updated 13 January 2021

Dwayne Johnson, DiCaprio headline Netflix’s 2021 movies

Dwayne Johnson, DiCaprio headline Netflix’s 2021 movies

LOS ANGELES: Netflix Inc said on Tuesday it will release more than 70 movies this year across comedy, drama, family and other genres, a lineup that underscores the streaming service’s growing prominence in the film business.

The Netflix slate includes crime thriller “Red Notice” starring Ryan Reynolds, Gal Gadot and Dwayne Johnson, one of six action movies, and zombie heist film “Army of the Dead” from director Zack Snyder. The dozen comedies include “Don’t Look Up” with an all-star cast of Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Lawrence, Timothée Chalamet, Tyler Perry, Meryl Streep and others.

All but four of the films will be available to Netflix customers in the more than 190 countries it serves. Ten of the movies are in languages other than English. 

The Netflix 2021 schedule includes 18 dramas, nine thrillers, eight animated films and eight romances.


What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo
Updated 16 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

From the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race, a history of white male America and a scathing indictment of what it has cost us.
After the election of Donald Trump, and the escalation of white male rage and increased hostility toward immigrants that came with him, New York Times-bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo found herself in conversation with Americans around the country, pondering one central question: How did we get here?
Oluo answers that question by pinpointing white men’s deliberate efforts to subvert women, people of color, and the disenfranchised. Through research and interviews, Oluo investigates the backstory of America’s growth, from immigrant migration to our national ethos around ingenuity, from the shaping of economic policy to the protection of sociopolitical movements that fortify male power. In the end, she shows how white men have long maintained a stranglehold on leadership and sorely undermined the pursuit of happiness for all, according to a review at goodreads.com.