US imposes Iran-related sanctions on three individuals and 16 entities

US imposes Iran-related sanctions on three individuals and 16 entities
This Thursday, June 6, 2019 file photo shows the U.S. Treasury Department building at dusk in Washington. (AP)
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Updated 14 January 2021

US imposes Iran-related sanctions on three individuals and 16 entities

US imposes Iran-related sanctions on three individuals and 16 entities
  • The designations are the latest action to reinforce the "maximum pressure" campaign on Iran

WASHINGTON: The United States on Wednesday blacklisted two Iranian foundations controlled by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and their subsidies, saying the institutions enabled Iran's elite to sustain a 'corrupt' system of ownership over large parts of the economy.
The designations announced by the US Treasury Department target Execution of Imam Khomeini's Order (EIKO) and Astan Quds Razavi (AQR), their leaders and subsidies. They are the latest action to reinforce the "maximum pressure" campaign on Iran pursued by President Donald Trump's administration.
Republican Trump is due to hand over power to Democratic President-elect Joe Biden after losing the Nov. 3 election.
"EIKO has systematically violated the rights of dissidents by confiscating land and property from opponents of the regime, including political opponents, religious minorities, and exiled Iranians," the Treasury said in a statement.
The sanctions freeze any US assets of those targeted and generally bar Americans from doing business with them. Anyone who engages in certain transactions with these individuals and entities runs the risk of being hit with US sanctions.
US-Iranian tensions have risen since Trump two years ago abandoned the 2015 Iran nuclear deal struck by his predecessor, Barack Obama, and restored harsh economic sanctions designed to force Tehran into a wider negotiation on curbing its nuclear program, development of ballistic missiles and support for regional proxy forces.
Biden, set to take office on Jan. 20, has said he will return the United States to the nuclear deal, if Iran resumes compliance.

 

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Rouhani to sue Iran state broadcaster over opium use comments

Ahmed Jahan Bozorgi, a cleric and member of an Islamic think tank, said Hassan Rouhani (pictured) could often not be reached by members of the Iranian Cabinet because he was at home smoking opium. (Reuters/File Photo)
Ahmed Jahan Bozorgi, a cleric and member of an Islamic think tank, said Hassan Rouhani (pictured) could often not be reached by members of the Iranian Cabinet because he was at home smoking opium. (Reuters/File Photo)
Updated 23 January 2021

Rouhani to sue Iran state broadcaster over opium use comments

Ahmed Jahan Bozorgi, a cleric and member of an Islamic think tank, said Hassan Rouhani (pictured) could often not be reached by members of the Iranian Cabinet because he was at home smoking opium. (Reuters/File Photo)
  • President accused of taking drugs by hardline cleric during live broadcast
  • Latest example of pressure being applied on moderates ahead of June presidential elections

LONDON: Hassan Rouhani, the president of Iran, is to sue his country’s state broadcaster after he was accused of opium use on national television.

On Friday, the president’s office of legal affairs said Rouhani would pursue damages for defamation after Ahmed Jahan Bozorgi, a cleric and member of an Islamic think tank, said Rouhani could often not be reached by members of the Iranian Cabinet because he was at home smoking the drug. 

Alireza Moezi, on behalf of Rouhani’s office, said: “What was broadcast last night was sadly just shameless insult, slander and foul language against the president.”

The Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting Corporation, which is controlled by the country’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and Bozorgi’s institute, which frequently advises the Iranian government, both subsequently distanced themselves from the comments. 

The incident, though, is seen by many as an attempt to undermine Rouhani, a relative moderate in Iranian politics, and his allies by conservative hardliners ahead of the country’s presidential elections later this year.

Rouhani, who will stand down having served two terms, has presided over a period of increasing tensions with the US during the sole term of President Donald Trump, a period in which the hardliners have made significant political gains, whilst failing to oust the president himself.

On Wednesday, Rouhani, Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and Communications Minister Mohammad Azari Jahromi were summoned to Parliament to face questions over their relationship with recently-installed US President Joe Biden.

Rouhani said he hoped that US sanctions on Iran would soon be lifted, amid hopes that a change of president in the US could see a return to the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or “Iran Nuclear Deal,” that was sidelined by the US under Trump.

Such a sequence of events, it is thought, would give Rouhani and his allies a significant political win in the build up to the June elections. The move is opposed by the hardliners, though, who favor a stronger stance on the US.

“We do not need the nuclear deal anymore. Our strength comes from the fact that we have kept our existence without it,” said Hossein Salami, commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.

One radical member of parliament, meanwhile, said Iran should look to “impeach” Rouhani, following the example of Democrat senators in the US towards Trump, amid claims the trio were “friends” of the new administration in Washington.