Biden announces return to global climate accord, new curbs on US oil industry

The orders by the newly sworn-in president will mark the start of a major policy reversal in the world’s second-largest greenhouse gas emitter behind China. (AP)
The orders by the newly sworn-in president will mark the start of a major policy reversal in the world’s second-largest greenhouse gas emitter behind China. (AP)
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Updated 21 January 2021

Biden announces return to global climate accord, new curbs on US oil industry

Biden announces return to global climate accord, new curbs on US oil industry
  • Biden has promised to put the United States on a track to net-zero emissions by 2050

WASHINGTON: US President Joe Biden on Wednesday announced America’s return to the international Paris Agreement to fight climate change, the centerpiece of a raft of day-one executive orders aimed at restoring US leadership in combating global warming.
The announcements also included a sweeping order to review all of former President Donald Trump’s actions weakening climate change protections, the revocation of a vital permit for TC Energy’s Keystone XL oil pipeline project from Canada, and a moratorium on oil and gas leasing activities in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge that Trump’s administration had recently opened to development.
The orders by the newly sworn-in president will mark the start of a major policy reversal in the world’s second-largest greenhouse gas emitter behind China, after the Trump administration pilloried climate science and rolled back environmental regulation to maximize fossil fuel development.
Biden has promised to put the United States on a track to net-zero emissions by 2050 to match the steep and swift global cuts that scientists say are needed to avoid the most devastating impacts of global warming, using curbs on fossil fuels and massive investments in clean energy.
The path will not be easy, though, with political divisions in the United States, opposition from fossil fuel companies, and wary international partners concerned about US policy shifts obstructing the way.
“We got off track very severely for the last four years with a climate denier in the Oval Office,” said John Podesta, an adviser to former President Barack Obama who helped craft the 2015 Paris Agreement. “We enter the international arena with a credibility deficit.”
Biden’s orders also require government agencies to consider revising vehicle fuel efficiency standards and methane emissions curbs, and to study the possibility of re-expanding the boundaries of wilderness national monuments that had been reduced in size by the Trump administration.
While environmental advocates were thrilled by the orders, industry groups and conservatives criticized them.

Alaska’s Republican Governor Mike Dunleavy mocked Biden’s decision to shut down oil and gas work in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, saying the new president “appears to be making good on his promise to turn Alaska into a large national park.”
The American Petroleum Institute, the nation’s top oil and gas industry lobby group, meanwhile, said it believed blocking the Keystone XL oil pipeline was a “step backward.”
“This misguided move will hamper America’s economic recovery, undermine North American energy security and strain relations with one of America’s greatest allies,” API President Mike Sommers said.
Global counterparts and climate advocates welcomed Washington’s return to cooperation on climate change, but expressed some skepticism about its staying power and its ability to overcome domestic political turmoil.
Trump withdrew the United States from the 2015 Paris deal late last year, arguing it was too costly to the US economy.
“The United States continues to be the one and only country that has withdrawn from the Paris Agreement, making it, frankly, the pariah of this multilateral agreement,” former UN climate chief Christiana Figueres, told Reuters.
Biden can regain US credibility by “doing the domestic homework” of ambitious climate action at home.
Brian Deese, Biden’s director of the National Economic Council, told Reuters that the United States hopes to encourage other big emitters to also “push their ambition, even as we have to demonstrate our ability to come back on the stage and show leadership.”
Pete Betts, an associate fellow at London-based think tank Chatham House who led climate negotiations for the European Union when the Paris deal was struck, said the United States will need to match its promises with financial commitments too.
The United States under Obama pledged to deliver $3 billion to the Green Climate Fund to help vulnerable countries fight climate change. It has delivered only $1 billion so far.
“The US will need to put some money on the table, and also encourage others to do the same,” he said.

 


Saudi crown prince launches Soudah Development Company with investment of SR 11 billion

Saudi crown prince launches Soudah Development Company with investment of SR 11 billion
Updated 24 February 2021

Saudi crown prince launches Soudah Development Company with investment of SR 11 billion

Saudi crown prince launches Soudah Development Company with investment of SR 11 billion
  • The company aims to create 8,000 permanent jobs by 2030
  • The new company is fully owned by the PIF and will lead the development of a luxury mountain destination

LONDON: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman launched on Wednesday the Soudah Development Company (SDC) in the Kingdom’s southwestern Asir region with an investment of $3 billion (11 billion riyals).
The multi billion investment in tourism infrastructure and attractions aims to create a world-class mountain destination in Asir and the SDC hopes to attract more than two million visitors a year, Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.
The company aims to create 8,000 permanent jobs by 2030 and will collaborate with the private sector to enhance the Kingdom’s tourism infrastructure with 2,700 hotel rooms, 1,300 residential units, and 30 unique commercial and entertainment attractions by 2030.
The new company is fully owned by the Public Investment Fund (PIF) and will lead the development of a luxury mountain destination with immersive cultural experiences that celebrate the natural assets of the region.
The company will pump funds into infrastructure and tourism projects that aim to enhance the visitor experience in Al-Soudah and parts of the Rijal Alma governorate. 
SDC aims to develop Al-Soudah and Rijal Alma into a year round sustainable destination for residents and visitors that will contribute an estimated of $ 8 billion to the Kingdom’s cumulative GDP by 2030. 
“Our investment in the Asir region reflects our confidence in the character of the location, which is a rich amalgamation of identity, heritage and experience,” the PIF’s governor Yasir Al-Rumayyan said.
“Through careful and considerate development, SDC will provide yet another remarkable destination in the diverse and growing portfolio of Saudi Arabian experiences capturing the imagination of a broad range of investors and travelers,” he added.
The new tourist destination adds to Saudi Arabia’s ambitious tourism goals and complements other destinations being created on the Red Sea coast and around the capital city of Riyadh.


PIF makes billions on its investment in Lucid Motors

PIF put $1 billion into Lucid in 2018, giving it a majority stake in the California-based company when it was at the early stages of designing advanced luxury electric cars. (Supplied)
PIF put $1 billion into Lucid in 2018, giving it a majority stake in the California-based company when it was at the early stages of designing advanced luxury electric cars. (Supplied)
Updated 24 February 2021

PIF makes billions on its investment in Lucid Motors

PIF put $1 billion into Lucid in 2018, giving it a majority stake in the California-based company when it was at the early stages of designing advanced luxury electric cars. (Supplied)
  • Saudi stake in Californian electric vehicle maker is proving a profitable step

DUBAI: The Public Investment Fund, Saudi Arabia’s premier investing institution, has seen a multi-billion dollar increase in the value of its investment in Lucid Motors, the fast-growing Californian electric vehicle manufacturer, as a result of recent transactions.

PIF put $1 billion into Lucid in 2018, giving it a majority stake in the California-based company when it was at the early stages of designing advanced luxury electric cars. With the first model, the Air, unveiled and set for first delivery this year, that stake is now worth a lot more.

In a complex financial transaction recently unveiled in the US, Lucid will merge with a special purpose acquisition company, or SPAC — a company specifically designed to get an initial public offering (IPO) and a valuation on a stock market.

The SPAC involved with Lucid is Churchill Capital Corp IV, a creation of investment banker Michael Klein, who is well known for his investment advisory work in the Kingdom, including the record-breaking IPO of Saudi Aramco in 2019.

The SPAC deal gives Lucid a formal valuation of $24bn, and the PIF remains the majority investor in the new set-up.

The Public Investment Fund, Saudi Arabia’s premier investing institution, has seen a multi-billion dollar increase in the value of its investment in Lucid Motors. (Supplied)

The PIF declined to give a detailed breakdown of the value of its investment, but the documents published in the SPAC transaction show it at around $15bn - and will possibly be worth a lot more once vehicles start being sold.

Shares in Churchill gyrated wildly in the days before the deal with Lucid was formally announced but settled well above the value at which PIF and other big investors bought into the company.

The influential Lex column of the Financial Times said: “The biggest winner is Lucid’s largest current shareholder, Saudi Arabia’s PIF.”

Peter Rawlinson, the chief executive of Lucid who formerly worked at rival electric car company Tesla, told journalists: “I think that the valuation is a reflection of our technology.”

Electric vehicles have been one of the big investment themes of the past year, with Tesla — the market leader — soaring to a market capitalization of $670bn, bigger than all the traditional car manufacturers combined and making its founder, Elon Musk, one of the richest men in the world.

Peter Rawlinson, the chief executive of Lucid Motors. (Supplied)

Rawlinson is unfazed by Tesla’s size or reputation. Last year, in the run up to the launch of the Air, he told Arab News: “We’ve got the best car in the world, but I’m more excited to know that we have technology that can cascade down to more affordable models for the man in the street. That’s what is going to change the world.”

For the PIF, the investment in Lucid is a demonstration of the value of its approach of taking strategic stakes in foreign companies. Last year, it spent $10bn buying US and European equities when they slumped in value after the pandemic crash, which it later sold when markets recovered.

There could also be an industrial benefit from the PIF-Lucid relationship. There has been increasing speculation that Rawlinson will choose Saudi Arabia as the first location for a manufacturing facility, with a site near Jeddah mentioned as a possible production plant.

Rawlinson said of PIF: “They put their faith in us, that’s why we’re here today thriving.”

The deal with Churchill will give Lucid the capital it needs to go into full-scale production of the Air from a new production facility in Arizona, and to move plans forward for an electric SUV.


IMF chief warns pandemic leaving some countries behind

IMF chief warns pandemic leaving some countries behind
Updated 24 February 2021

IMF chief warns pandemic leaving some countries behind

IMF chief warns pandemic leaving some countries behind

WASHINGTON: The crisis caused by the pandemic is leaving many economies lagging behind, increasing the plight of the poor, a problem made worse by “uneven” access to vaccines, IMF chief Kristalina Georgieva said Wednesday.
In a message to the Group of 20 meeting on Friday Georgieva urged governments to increase vaccine distribution, ensuring Covid-19 is brought under control.
“The economic arguments for coordinated action are overwhelming,” she said in a blog post.
“Faster progress in ending the health crisis could raise global income cumulatively by $9 trillion over 2020-25. That would benefit all countries.”
She said that should include financing for vaccinations, reallocation of excess supply to countries with a shortage, and scaling up of production.
The global pandemic death toll is approaching 2.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins University, and the shutdowns forced to control infections have devastated economies.
And while vaccine rollouts are raising hopes for a recovery this year, the IMF forecasts job losses in the G20 alone to total more than 25 million this year.
By the end of 2022, emerging market and developing nations — excluding China — will see per capital incomes 22 percent below pre-crisis levels, compared to just 13 percent lower for advanced economies, which will throw millions more into extreme poverty, Georgieva warned.
“That is why we need much stronger international collaboration to accelerate the vaccine rollout in poorer countries,” she said.
G20 finance ministers and central bank chiefs led by Rome will meet by videoconference to discuss the state of the recovery and how best to attack the problem.
The Washington-based crisis lender estimated more than half of the world’s 110 emerging and developing countries will see their incomes fall further behind advanced economies through the end of next year.
And the virus-driven economic crisis also will widen income gaps within developing nations, especially as millions of children are still facing disruptions to education.
“Allowing them to become a lost generation would be an unforgiveable mistake. It would also deepen the long-term economic scars of the crisis,” she warned.


Pfizer eyes investment, recruitment, R&D in Kingdom

Pfizer eyes investment, recruitment, R&D in Kingdom
Updated 24 February 2021

Pfizer eyes investment, recruitment, R&D in Kingdom

Pfizer eyes investment, recruitment, R&D in Kingdom
  • Pharma giant transforming its Saudi operations amid COVID-19 vaccine rollout

RIYADH: Pfizer is one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies and has been operating in Saudi Arabia for six decades, but many people in the Kingdom will have come to know the brand only as a result of its work developing a coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine.

Patrick van der Loo, regional president for Africa and the Middle East, has worked at the company for 20 years and, in December, was appointed to lead the distribution of the vaccine across a challenging and wide-ranging group of countries.

“Saudi Arabia and the GCC kicked off their COVID-19 vaccination drive with the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in December as some of the first countries globally to do so. The allocation of doses and implementation plan within a country is a decision for local governments based on relevant health authority guidance,” he told Arab News.

“Pfizer and BioNTech are working relentlessly to supply the world with 2 billion BNT162b2 vaccine doses by the end of 2021. Our Belgium facility’s upscaling work included process improvements to our manufacturing lines, expanding our manufacturing facility with a new production unit, and increasing batch sizes to optimize efficiency,” he added.

Operating in the region for 60 years and with a workforce of 460 employees, Pfizer has a long partnership with the Kingdom. In October 2011, it signed an agreement with the-then Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) — now called Ministry of Investment — to set up its first-ever manufacturing plant in the GCC in King Abdullah Economic City.

In 2016, SAGIA issued a “trading license” to Pfizer, the first multinational pharmaceutical company awarded such a permit. The license gave Pfizer “100 percent foreign ownership” of its legal entity in Saudi Arabia, with the ability to import, export and trade in wholesale and retail products, equipment and instruments, he said.

Construction of the new manufacturing and packaging facility was completed in 2017 and Pfizer is planning to expand further in coming years, as the Kingdom moves closer to realizing its Vision 2030 goals to diversify away from hydrocarbons and increase local production.

“Pfizer is an active player in Saudi Arabia, and is in a continuous dialogue with multiple authorities to explore new opportunities, including investments, to support its vision and objectives,” van der Loo said.

Arriving in the region at a critical time, van der Loo said he is relishing the challenge ahead.

“While this region is new to me, I will gladly welcome new challenges and devote my energy to finding solutions focused on patient outcomes. Working in the region is also offering me the opportunity to get involved in the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine distribution across a wide range of countries, and it is gratifying to be part of something of this scale,” he said.

Patrick van der Loo, regional president for Africa and the Middle East, has worked at the company for 20 years. (Supplied)

According to Reuters, Pfizer is aiming to produce 2 billion COVID-19 vaccines this year, earnings it around $15 billion, or about a quarter of its sales.

While COVID-19 may be his immediate priority, van der Loo is also leading the transformation of Pfizer’s wider portfolio of products across Saudi Arabia and the wider Middle East region.

“Pfizer is shifting from a diversified company with a consumer health portfolio and comprehensive portfolio of legacy brands to a more science-focused biopharmaceutical powerhouse. In KSA and the Gulf, we aim to ensure the early introduction of breakthroughs — sometimes some of the earliest in the world, which truly demonstrates the innovative eagerness of specific markets in the Middle East,” he said.

There are currently multiple clinical trial protocols — phase two and three — under review, and some have reached the final stages of development and approval in oncology, vaccine, public health and gene therapy.

“We are also very proud of our collaboration with multiple Saudi research centers to access clinical trials and innovative treatments in the medical field. The trial of gene therapy in Duchenne’s disease at King Faisal Specialty Hospital and Research Center is a milestone,” he said.

Pfizer is also providing training and development opportunities for multiple Saudi entities operating in the healthcare, training and education sectors, as part of the National Transformation Program.

Looking ahead to 2021, van der Loo said Pfizer will have “several product launches in oncology, among other areas, to reach new patients with critical breakthrough treatments and prevention tools.”


Saudi Arabia sees 227% surge in wealthy individuals in last 5 years

Saudi Arabia sees 227% surge in wealthy individuals in last 5 years
Updated 24 February 2021

Saudi Arabia sees 227% surge in wealthy individuals in last 5 years

Saudi Arabia sees 227% surge in wealthy individuals in last 5 years
  • Saudi Arabia bucked Mideast trend, with number of people with over $30m growing in 2020

RIYADH: The number of ultra-high-net-worth individuals (UHNWIs) — those with $30 million or more — in Saudi Arabia surged 227 percent over the last five years, the fastest growth rate in the world.

According to The Wealth Report by real estate consultancy firm Knight Frank, the number of UHNWIs worldwide will increase by 27 percent in the next five years to 663,483, with the number of millionaires growing by 41 percent.

The report predicts that the number of UHNWIs in the Middle East will rise by 24.6 percent by 2025, with the region expected to remain the fourth-largest wealth hub in the world.

“The pandemic has impacted the fortunes of many in the Middle East, and the Middle Eastern HNWIs and UHNWIs were not spared, with the total number of each decreasing by 11.3 percent and 10.1 percent in 2020 respectively,” said Taimur Khan, head of research at Knight Frank Middle East.

“However, this decline was not uniform across all countries. In Saudi Arabia over this period, the number of UHNWIs increased by 9.6 percent, the 10th fastest growth rate globally. In fact, its UHNW population has grown by 227 percent over the last five years, the fastest growth rate globally over this period,” he added.

“As the region continues its various economic diversification programs, we expect that there will continue to be significant growth in the number of UHNWIs and billionaires residing in the region.”

According to a survey conducted by Knight Frank of private bankers and wealth advisers, half said their clients’ wealth had increased in 2020.

In the Middle East, 67 percent of respondents said their clients’ wealth either remained the same or increased. Sixty-nine percent said they expect their clients’ total wealth to increase in 2021.

The reports found that Asia is likely to see the largest rise in the number of UHNWIs, with growth of 39 percent, led by Indonesia (67 percent) and India (63 percent).

“The US is, and will remain, the world’s dominant wealth hub over our forecast period, but Asia will see the fastest growth in UHNWIs over the next five years. By 2025, Asia will host 24 percent of all UHNWIs, up from 17 percent a decade earlier,” said Liam Bailey, global head of research at Knight Frank.

“The region is already home to more billionaires than any other. China is the key to this phenomenon, with 246 percent forecast growth in very wealthy residents in the decade to 2025.”