Saudi women lead the charge in growing SME sector

Saudi women lead the charge in growing SME sector
Reforms in the Kingdom have provided funding to projects and initiatives, which have created opportunities for women in government and the private sector. (Reuters/File)
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Updated 24 March 2021

Saudi women lead the charge in growing SME sector

Saudi women lead the charge in growing SME sector
  • Reforms in the Kingdom have provided funding to projects and initiatives, which have created opportunities for women in government and the private sector

JEDDAH: Behind every Saudi small and medium enterprise, you will find a creative, passionate entrepreneur empowered by support and social reforms.
Saudi women were known to own their businesses long before the social reforms took place, but the trend has grown extensively as changes pushed many into the business world, diversifying the market, their source of income, and contributing to the Kingdom’s gross domestic product.
The global trend of women in business is important, helping them to be self-dependent, play a prosperous role in their community, and raise employment rates. Governments have encouraged women by ensuring there are laws to protect them and their businesses, with the private sector also furthering the transformation.
Arab News spoke to 36-year-old Saudi Hessa Hassan, founder and owner of Curl Boutique, the first salon in the Kingdom that focuses on curly and natural hair. The entrepreneur opened her salon in October 2020 after studying the market and finding that few salons catered to women with curly hair. She was certified in her trade and through her social media platform, encouraged women to love their curls.
She told Arab News: “Stepping up and evolving our roles can only be a positive thing for all involved. Including and empowering women in the economy in a new way — as creators, entrepreneurs and business owners —  is one of the surest ways to boost the sector and get the Kingdom where it wants to go. It also, frankly, is a good way to ensure women will get the goods and services they actually want.”
She said women also bring new and fresh perspectives, creativity, expertise, and leadership styles that can add an important new dimension to the sector and to the economy.
“Beyond that, having a system and role models that support them — like Saudi Arabia is doing now — will increase the numbers of female participants in businesses and the economy and inspire an ongoing cycle of growth and investment. I truly believe the possibilities are endless, and we are just at the beginning,” Hassan added.
The business owner said it is important to support small local businesses owned by Saudi women.
“There has been an enormous amount of untapped potential and we are finally starting to see it bloom. In many cases, people will be buying these goods and services anyway, so why not support home-grown talent?”
She added: “This is talent that knows the context, market, and needs of the community. And again, contributing to and supporting this system will cause ripple effects in the economy and in the real lives of women and families that we might not even fully imagine yet.
“I know that on a personal level, if I had seen someone like me running a business when I was young, I might have been inspired to start much earlier.”
Hassan said that she hoped to “inspire girls — including the beautiful, brilliant, and ambitious young clients I see every day — to follow their dreams and be the ones to provide solutions in the marketplace, rather than waiting or looking outside.”
According to a World Bank report, the number of Saudi women entrepreneurs increased by 50 percent between 2018 and 2019, particularly in the consumer service sector.
According to a Global Entrepreneurship Monitor report in 2020, the highest rates of women’s entrepreneurial intentions were reported in the Middle East and North Africa region at 36.6 percent. Saudi female entrepreneurs were responsible for driving this trend.

HIGHLIGHT

According to a World Bank report, the number of Saudi women entrepreneurs increased by 50 percent between 2018 and 2019, particularly in the consumer service sector.

Reforms in the Kingdom have provided funding to projects and initiatives, which have created opportunities for women in government and the private sector. These reforms have played an integral part in creating safe work environments to foster growth and innovation.
Arab News also spoke to Yasser Al-Ammari, a Saudi entrepreneur, who initiated a campaign to support small local businesses owned by Saudi women this month.
The founder of the online platform coffinado.com, saw that the role of women in the small business sector provides a boost for all Saudis to help one another and allow their businesses to grow.
“By sharing an announcement on social media to support local businesses, Coffinado seized this opportunity to show appreciation and support for fellow female business owners, especially those who just started,” he said.
Al-Ammari said most of the important departments at Coffinado are led by women, such as the marketing, partnerships, and human resources teams.
As a founder of a small business himself, he said that a woman’s role in business is significant, and highlighted that female business owners bring out the best in a company when they are fully dedicated to it.
“Their roles are as important as men’s work in every business,” he said, adding: “Women with high commitment, dedication, and hard work drive always bring the best benefits to the business.”


Saudi minister attends swearing-in ceremony of Djibouti’s president

Saudi minister attends swearing-in ceremony of Djibouti’s president
Updated 23 min 24 sec ago

Saudi minister attends swearing-in ceremony of Djibouti’s president

Saudi minister attends swearing-in ceremony of Djibouti’s president

DJIBOUTI: Ahmed Abdul Aziz Kattan, Saudi minister of state for African affairs, has attended on behalf of King Salman the swearing-in ceremony of Ismail Omar Guelleh after he was reelected for a new term as president of Djibouti.

Kattan conveyed to the elected president the congratulations and wishes of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for more progress and prosperity.


Who’s Who: Alanoud Abdullah Al-Showaier, GM at Saudi Ministry of Communications and Information Technology

Who’s Who: Alanoud Abdullah Al-Showaier, GM at Saudi Ministry of Communications and Information Technology
Updated 7 min 46 sec ago

Who’s Who: Alanoud Abdullah Al-Showaier, GM at Saudi Ministry of Communications and Information Technology

Who’s Who: Alanoud Abdullah Al-Showaier, GM at Saudi Ministry of Communications and Information Technology

Alanoud Abdullah Al-Showaier has been the general manager of knowledge and digital content at the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology since January 2021.

The knowledge and digital content department seeks to achieve the key objectives of Vision 2030 through eliminating digital illiteracy and building an integrated ecosystem for disseminating digital knowledge and enhancing technical content.

Prior to her new role, Al-Showaier served as the director of production and marketing communication programs at Saudi Customs from July 2019 to December 2020.

Before she joined the government sector, Al-Showaier worked for more than six years in the private sector, from 2013 until 2019. She spent one year at Al-Tayyar Travel Group as a PR and marketing specialist. After that, she worked for five years in communication and marketing agencies as an account and project director and key adviser to the CEO.

Al-Showaier has a track record of leading and overseeing brands of all sectors from private to government and semi-government for more than nine years. She also worked for more than 25 clients in several sectors.

She has been a member of the digital media committee at the Riyadh Chamber of Commerce and Industry since October 2020, and a member of the arbitration committee at Pioneer Marketing Award since November 2019.

She was an invited speaker on the Misk Media Forum in 2019 as well as the Second Summit on Women’s Enablement in the Technology Sector.

Al-Showaier was chosen for the Women Leaders 2030 program and graduated from the Leading for Results Programme offered by INSEAD Executive Education.

She received her bachelor’s degree in economics from King Saud University in Riyadh in 2010 and holds a diploma in digital marketing from the DM3 Institute.


Organic waste offers Saudi Arabia a plentiful and sustainable resource

Clockwise from left: Sanitation workers collect litter during the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah; piles of plastic bottles before they are recycled; circular fields, part of the green oasis of Wadi Al-Dawasir. (AFP/File Photos)
Clockwise from left: Sanitation workers collect litter during the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah; piles of plastic bottles before they are recycled; circular fields, part of the green oasis of Wadi Al-Dawasir. (AFP/File Photos)
Updated 47 min 32 sec ago

Organic waste offers Saudi Arabia a plentiful and sustainable resource

Clockwise from left: Sanitation workers collect litter during the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah; piles of plastic bottles before they are recycled; circular fields, part of the green oasis of Wadi Al-Dawasir. (AFP/File Photos)
  • Most of the 15 million tons of garbage generated every year ends up in giant landfills
  • With recycling incentives, discarded plastics could be reused in housing, roads and even artwork

RIYADH: Once upon a time, mankind produced a small amount of waste. Food was not packaged, fruit and vegetable peelings were fed to animals and the dung from horses and camels was used for fertilizer or dried and burned for heating. Most of what came from the earth went directly back into the earth with little or no harm to the environment.

Today, we live in a consumer age in which multitudes of products are purchased and the ensuing trash disposed of with little or no regard for its detrimental impact. Many single-use goods are manufactured and distributed at considerable expense, only to be momentarily used and then thrown away forever.

Saudi Arabia produces no less than 15 million tons of garbage per year — most of which ends up in giant landfills, full of dangerous toxins that seep deep into the ground.

Fortunately, there are now signs of a sea change, both in the Kingdom and around the world. An emerging concept known as “the circular economy” holds that any form of solid waste can be the raw material for a new and more valuable resource.

This is a contemporary answer to alchemy — the medieval quest to turn base matter into gold.

The circular economy involves both upcycling (the process of transforming waste materials into products of greater value) and downcycling (whereby discarded material is used to create something of lower quality and functionality).

Plastic is an obvious starting point. Heralded as a miracle substance almost a century ago, it became ubiquitous in our groceries, clothing, cars and electronic devices.

That initial enthusiasm for plastic has gradually led to a sober realization that it takes up to 500 years to decompose — presenting an environmental calamity that we witness daily on streets littered with plastic bags, cups, bottles and straws.

But did you know that some 50 percent of the plastic waste in Saudi Arabia is collected for recycling?

Plastic bottles before they are recycled. (AFP/File Photo)

Once cleaned and processed, this used plastic can be transformed into pellets, which in turn are melted down to form anything from household tiles to benches to roadside curbs. Japan is the leader in this respect, now recycling almost 90 percent of its plastic waste.

In fact, it is normal in Japan for households to have over half a dozen different containers for various kinds of trash, to ease sorting for recycling purposes.

India’s Kerala Highway Research Institute has developed a recycled, plastic-derived road-surfacing material that is more durable than conventional tarmac and able to withstand the heavy monsoon rains.

Household waste can also produce the energy needed to heat homes and charge electric cars of the future.

As organic matter (that is, anything from apple cores to onion skins) decomposes, it produces methane gas — a source of energy. Other solid waste — for example, cardboard and wood — can be incinerated, again to provide energy.

These processes are collectively known as “waste-to-energy” (WtE). Methods also exist for the filtration of the resulting fumes, reducing carbon output from WtE to almost zero.

A sanitation worker collects litter during the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah on August 22, 2018. (AFP/File Photo)

A 2017 study by King Saud University’s Department of Engineering Sciences concluded that Jeddah alone has the potential to produce 180 megawatts (MW) of electricity from garbage incineration and another 87.3 MW from garbage-sourced synthetic gas (syngas).

Another study by Dr. Abdul-Sattar Nizami, assistant professor at the Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies at Jeddah’s King Abdul Aziz University, estimates that 3 terawatt-hours per year could be generated if all of Saudi Arabia’s food waste was utilized in syngas plants.

Sewage is another valuable resource, in two ways. First, just like household waste, sewage produces methane, which can be harnessed to produce energy. Second, sewage water can be treated and reused for irrigation and industrial purposes.

The potential gasification of solid waste and sewage is especially pertinent to Saudi Arabia, which derives a large proportion of its freshwater from desalinated seawater, every drop of which is precious.

RECYLING IN SAUDI ARABIA

* 15m - Tonnes of garbage produced by KSA per year.

* 50% - Plastic waste collected for recycling.

* 3TW-hours - Energy potential from food waste per year.

The Saudi government has already realized this and is taking proactive steps to generate at least half of its energy requirements from renewables by 2030. “Waste to energy” will no doubt play a role in this new paradigm.

In the city of Marselisborg in Denmark, sewage-derived methane now generates over 150 percent of the electricity needed to run its water-treatment plant. The surplus power is used to pump drinking water to homes and offices.

Much of Saudi Arabia’s sewage is filtered and repurposed, presenting an opportunity to produce cheap and abundant energy.

A similar philosophy can be applied to land use. Areas currently dismissed as wasteland can be reimagined as beautiful public spaces.

A partial view of the Sharaan Nature Reserve near AlUla in northwestern Saudi Arabia. (AFP/File Photo)

King Salman is a pioneer in this regard. Up until his tenure as governor of Riyadh Province, Wadi Hanifah, the dry riverbed that winds down the western edge of Riyadh, was an unsightly dumping ground for garbage and industrial effluent.

Working with an international team of landscapers, botanists and water-management experts, King Salman transformed the wadi into the exquisite meandering parkland it is today, with its thousands of trees, lush wetlands and charming picnic spots.

Another example of wasteland regeneration is the Highline of Manhattan — an elevated rail track that was abandoned after the Port of New York was largely shut down in the 1960s.

Instead of being demolished at great trouble and expense, this rusty eyesore was turned into a lovely green walkway through the concrete jungle and is today a major tourist attraction.

And just as wastelands can be repurposed to create attractive new spaces, many artists are using discarded materials to create stunning sculptures, while making powerful statements about our abuse of the planet.

The Milan-based artist Maria Cristina Finucci used two tons of plastic bottle caps and thousands of red-net food bags, placed inside recycled plastic containers, to spell out the word “HELP.”

One critic described this work as “a cry from humanity ... to curb the environmental disaster of the pollution of the seas.”

A McDonald’s table covered with trash. (Supplied)

In a similar vein, two Singaporean artists, Von Wong and Joshua Goh, created a work called “Plastikophobia” — an immersive art installation made from 18,000 discarded plastic cups, to raise awareness about single-use plastic pollution.

After decades of short-termism and willful denial of environmental destruction, all-encompassing smart waste-management policies are still in their infancy. The know-how and technology exist. They just need to be put into practice.

The Kingdom is already striking out in the right direction. Its Saudi Green Initiative, launched in March, calls for regional cooperation to tackle environmental challenges, boost the use of renewables and eliminate more than 130 million tons of carbon emissions.

The Middle East Green Initiative likewise sets out to reduce carbon emissions by 60 percent across the region.

There are also plans to plant 10 billion trees in the Kingdom and restore 40 million hectares of degraded land, while across the wider region there are plans for 50 billion trees and the restoration of 200 million hectares of degraded land.

Much will depend upon enlightenment and imagination at a societal and individual level. Do we continue to regard our world as a supposedly infinite source of material for our consumption and as a dumping ground for the resulting junk, or do we aim for a cleaner, more sustainable circular economy?

Young people, in particular, are increasingly concerned for the future of their planet and are highly motivated to protect it. This awakening is already beginning to translate into government policy, in Saudi Arabia and around the world. 


Saudi, Egyptian, Kuwaiti foreign ministers call for immediate ceasefire in Palestinian territories

Saudi, Egyptian, Kuwaiti foreign ministers call for immediate ceasefire in Palestinian territories
Updated 15 May 2021

Saudi, Egyptian, Kuwaiti foreign ministers call for immediate ceasefire in Palestinian territories

Saudi, Egyptian, Kuwaiti foreign ministers call for immediate ceasefire in Palestinian territories
  • Prince Faisal and Sameh Shoukry discussed developments in the Palestinian territories
  • They renewed their demand for the international community to confront aggressive Israeli practices

RIYADH: The foreign ministers of Saudi Arabia and Egypt called for an immediate ceasefire in Palestinian territories on Saturday.

Prince Faisal bin Farhan and Sameh Shoukry discussed developments in the Palestinian territories as part of continuous coordination between the Kingdom and Egypt.

They renewed their demand for the international community to confront aggressive Israeli practices against the Palestinian people.

The foreign ministers highlighted the importance of working to resume peace efforts in a manner that guarantees all legitimate Palestinian rights.

Prince Faisal also received a telephone call from his Kuwait counterpart during which the two officials discussed the escalation in violence in the region.

Prince Faisal and Sheikh Ahmad Nasser Al-Mohammad Al-Sabah discussed the Palestinian cause, developments in the region and bilateral relations.


Saudi Arabia announces 13 more COVID-19 deaths

Saudi Arabia announces 13 more COVID-19 deaths
Updated 15 May 2021

Saudi Arabia announces 13 more COVID-19 deaths

Saudi Arabia announces 13 more COVID-19 deaths
  • The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom has increased to 416,759
  • A total of 7,147 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia announced 13 deaths from COVID-19 and 837 new infections on Saturday.
Of the new cases, 290 were recorded in Riyadh, 240 in Makkah, 97 in the the Eastern Province, 59 in Asir, 55 in Madinah, 28 in Jazan, 15 in Najran, 10 in Hail, eight in Al-Baha, five in Al-Jouf, and one in Tabuk.
The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom increased to 416,759 after 1,012 more patients recovered from the virus.
A total of 7,147 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far.
Over 11.3 million doses of a coronavirus vaccine have been administered in the Kingdom to date.