No ‘provoking’: Israeli defense minister vows quieter tone with US

US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin greets Israel's Defense Minister Benny Gantz during an enhanced honor cordon for Gantz at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on June 3, 2021. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)
US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin greets Israel's Defense Minister Benny Gantz during an enhanced honor cordon for Gantz at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on June 3, 2021. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)
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Updated 04 June 2021

No ‘provoking’: Israeli defense minister vows quieter tone with US

No ‘provoking’: Israeli defense minister vows quieter tone with US
  • Iran’s nuclear program and other actions were an “existential threat”, Gantz tells US leadership
  • Urges US to ensure that any deal "effectively meets its goal of keeping Iran away from nuclear weapons”

ARLINGTON, US: Israel’s visiting defense minister said Thursday that it will stay engaged as the US tries to return to a nuclear deal with Iran, sidestepping what’s long been an area of open disagreement between the United States and the now-jeopardized government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Benny Gantz told reporters before a meeting with Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin that Iran’s nuclear program and other actions were an “existential threat” to Israel. “Stopping Iran is certainly a shared strategic need of the United States,” Israel and other countries, Gantz said.
But on a visit that came as an opposition coalition back home tries to end Netanyahu’s 12 years in power, Gantz — unlike Netanyahu — stopped short of openly opposing the Biden administration’s efforts to get the United States back into a deal limiting Iran’s nuclear program, in exchange for relief from sanctions.
Sitting across a table from his US counterpart at the Pentagon, Gantz said, “Our dialogue is so important to ensuring that any deal effectively meets its goal of keeping Iran away from nuclear weapons.”
“Of course, given the scope of the threat, Israel must always make sure that it has the ability to protect itself,” Gantz added.
The Israeli official made clear the change in tone was purposeful. “We will continue this important strategic dialogue in private discussion ... only, not in the media in a provoking way,” he said, calling for “open dialogue behind closed doors.” It echoed Biden’s own embrace of what the administration has called quiet diplomacy when dealing with Israel.
Netanyahu’s years-long fight to torpedo the Iran nuclear deal — struck during the Obama administration in 2015, but rejected by President Donald Trump after his election — included Netanyahu denouncing it to a 2015 joint session of the US Congress as a “very bad deal.”
Netanyahu has continued that open opposition in recent days, saying a deal “paves the way for Iran to have an arsenal of nuclear weapons with international legitimacy” and that the fight against that was worth any “friction with our great friend the United States.”
Biden has pressed for a return to the nuclear deal as the best way to keep Iran from building up what it says is a civilian nuclear program, and to calm a flashpoint in the Middle East. European negotiators expressed some optimism this week as they closed the latest round of talks in Vienna on getting the US and Iran back in the deal.
Gantz also met with national security adviser Jake Sullivan and Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Gantz is part of the coalition pushing to unseat Netanyahu, and he is expected to remain in his post as defense minister if the government changes.
His meetings Thursday underscored US security commitments to Israel as that country weathers its greatest domestic political upheaval in years and the aftermath of last month’s war with Hamas militants in Gaza.
Gantz said he would lay out for administration officials a “complete plan” for a diplomatic end to hostilities with the Palestinians. He gave no details.
A key aim of Gantz’s visit to Washington was believed to be securing US funding to help restock Israel’s Iron Dome, a sophisticated missile defense system that smacked down many of the rockets Hamas militants fired toward Israel last month. More than 260 people were killed, the vast majority Palestinians, in an 11-day war in which Israel struck targets in Hamas-ruled Gaza with hundreds of airstrikes while Hamas fired more than 4,000 rockets at Israel.
Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, touring Israel this week in a show of support after the latest Gaza war, said he expected Israelis to seek up to $1 billion from the US for Iron Dome, including for restocking the system’s interception missiles.
US officials made no immediate announcements on funding. Austin noted Biden “has expressed his full support for replenishing Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system, which saved so many lives.”
“We are committed to maintaining Israel’s qualitative military edge and ensuring that Israel can defend itself,” Austin added.
The US partnership in Israel’s Iron Dome has wide bipartisan support in Congress, as does overall US support for Israel’s defense, a tenet of US foreign policy for decades. Last month’s war, however — the fiercest Israeli-Palestinian fighting since 2014 — has exposed a rift in Biden’s Democratic Party. Progressives and some others demanded a cease-fire by Israel as well as Hamas as Palestinian deaths grew in the crowded Gaza Strip.
Blinken told reporters before meeting with Gantz that Americans also were talking to him about getting aid in to Gaza to help rebuild housing and services damaged and destroyed in the fighting, in addition to discussing Israeli security.


Egyptian, South Korean presidents talk joint economic, military and technological issues

Egyptian, South Korean presidents talk joint economic, military and technological issues
Updated 48 min 25 sec ago

Egyptian, South Korean presidents talk joint economic, military and technological issues

Egyptian, South Korean presidents talk joint economic, military and technological issues
  • Moon expressed Seoul’s interest in increasing its investments in development and infrastructure projects
  • The pair discussed cooperation in railway development, an important priority for the Egyptian state

CAIRO: Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi and his South Korean counterpart Moon Jae-in discussed issues of mutual concern on Thursday during the first visit by a South Korean president to Cairo in nearly 16 years.

El-Sisi praised the depth of relations between the two countries, stressing the importance of working to activate the comprehensive cooperative partnership between them in a manner commensurate with their capabilities.

Moon expressed his happiness visiting Egypt for the first time, thanking El-Sisi for his warm reception and hospitality, and expressing keenness to continue coordination and consultation between in various fields, as well as looking forward to developing and strengthening South Korea’s relations with Egypt in light of its pivotal role providing stability and security in the Middle East and Africa.

He also expressed Seoul’s interest in increasing its investments in major development and infrastructure projects and elsewhere in Egypt.

The pair discussed cooperation in railway development, an important priority for the Egyptian state. They also discussed the localization of the electric car industry in Egypt and how South Korea could assist with the “Decent Life” initiative, launched by El-Sisi to develop poorer villages and governorates in Egypt, in addition to cooperation in energy production, in light of the two countries’ keenness to diversify and secure their energy sources.

Moon and El-Sisi also discussed ways to enhance military cooperation, especially with regard to joint manufacturing and the transfer and localization of technology, in light of Egypt’s strategic role in the region and South Korea’s advanced technological capabilities and military industries.

In a press conference, El-Sisi expressed Egypt’s desire to attract Korean companies and investments, with Cairo’s readiness to provide all the necessary facilities to create a promising environment, and to encourage an increase in Korean investments in major development and infrastructure projects, as well as in energy, mining, transportation, communications and information technology.

El-Sisi indicated that he agreed with Moon on the importance of strengthening joint cooperation to support the Egyptian vision of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, whether through the establishment of a branch of the Korean University of Advanced Science and Technology, or cooperation between the ministries of communications and information technology in using artificial intelligence.

He explained that his talks with the South Korean president reviewed partnership opportunities between Egyptian companies operating in Africa and Korean companies, and promoted investment in Africa, highlighting the opportunities offered by the Continental Free Trade Area to increase investment and trade flows between African countries and the international community.

The Egyptian presidency said in a statement that the talks also witnessed a review of the developments of a number of regional and international issues of common interest, including the Libyan crisis. El-Sisi stressed that stability in Libya is a priority and that Egypt will continue its tireless efforts with Libyan parties to hold national elections. The president also affirmed Egypt’s permanent support for all mechanisms that guarantee the security and stability of the Korean Peninsula.

Moon praised Egyptian political efforts in maintaining security and stability in the Middle East and Africa, especially with regard to Egyptian moves to reach a political settlement of crises in the region, as well as its tireless efforts, led by El-Sisi, to combat terrorism and extremist ideology, as well as spread the values of coexistence and tolerance in the region, strengthening bridges of dialogue between African and Arab countries with the rest of the world.

The two presidents witnessed the signing ceremony of a number of memoranda of understanding between their countries in trade and economic partnership, development cooperation, and railways. The Korean president’s visit to Egypt concludes his tour of the region, which included visits to the UAE and Saudi Arabia.


Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week: Senior officials take stock of MENA progress in fight against climate change

The opening ceremony of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week (ADSW), the global platform for accelerating sustainability hosted by Masdar – Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company. (WAM)
The opening ceremony of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week (ADSW), the global platform for accelerating sustainability hosted by Masdar – Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company. (WAM)
Updated 20 January 2022

Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week: Senior officials take stock of MENA progress in fight against climate change

The opening ceremony of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week (ADSW), the global platform for accelerating sustainability hosted by Masdar – Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company. (WAM)
  • Saudi Arabia and the UAE praised for pioneering green energy initiatives as part of accelerated climate actions
  • US climate envoy John Kerry sees the Middle East playing a big role in shift to clean, renewable power 

DUBAI: Efforts by governments in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to accelerate climate action were praised at the Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week in the UAE capital.

Since its inauguration in 2008, ADSW has been bringing members of the global community together to accelerate sustainable development.

In keeping with this practice, this year’s events provided heads of state, policy makers, business leaders and technology pioneers with a platform to share knowledge, showcase innovation and outline strategies for delivering climate action.

Amid growing concerns over the impact of global warming, the UAE and Saudi Arabia, in particular, were cited by ADSW participants as examples for the rest of the world on the strength of their pioneering “green energy” initiatives.

John Kerry, US President Joe Biden’s special presidential envoy for climate, detailed the significant progress made by countries throughout the MENA region.

The UAE is preparing to host the UN Climate Change Conference (COP28) in 2023, making it only the third Arab country to be given the honor. Egypt will be the host of COP27, to be held later this year, exactly 10 years after Qatar became the first Arab country to welcome COP delegates.

Held once a year, the conference brings together representatives of governments that signed the UN Framework Convention of Climate Change to discuss how to jointly address climate change.

The Paris Agreement, signed by almost all countries in the world at COP21 in 2015, aims, among other things, to keep the rise in the global average temperature to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, but ideally keep it to 1.5 degrees.

The UAE is preparing to host the UN Climate Change Conference (COP28) in 2023, making it only the third Arab country to be given the honor. (AFP)

“The region is stepping up and it’s an extremely important message to the rest of the world, that (those) who are producers of the current source of our power, energy and heating, recognize that there will be a transition,” Kerry said.

“Clearly, we are moving toward clean, renewable power and sustainable structures, and the Middle East, together with the Horn of Africa, is going to play a huge role in that over the course of the next two years.”

Indeed, MENA oil and gas producers are increasingly being viewed as part of the solution, with the region boasting some of the lowest methane emissions in their production.

While carbon dioxide is widely identified as the chief culprit behind global warming, methane is second on the list of the worst greenhouse gas contributors to climate change.

Total indirect greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas operations today are around 5,200 million tons of carbon-dioxide equivalent. Methane is the largest single component of these indirect emissions.

Unlike CO2, which stays in the atmosphere for thousands of years, methane is gone in about 10 to 15 years. But while it is in the atmosphere, methane has a detrimental effect up to 85 times worse than CO2 (over a 20-year period).

“That is a serious problem when we look at the fact that over the next 10 years. We have our greatest challenge of trying to reduce our emissions by at least 45 percent,” Kerry said. “So, to achieve that, methane has to be part of the solution and, for whatever reason, it has been the stepchild of the process and nobody has really focused in on it.”

This year, Biden and the EU announced an initiative to get 109 nations to sign the methane pledge and start working together to “plug the leaks.”

John Kerry, US President Joe Biden’s special presidential envoy for climate, detailed the significant progress made by countries throughout the MENA region. (Supplied)

The collective hope is that global methane emissions will be reduced by 30 percent by 2030 — the equivalent of every automobile, truck, aircraft and ship going to zero emissions in that time. “That’s a gigantic gain for all of us,” Kerry said. “It saves about 0.2 degrees on the rise of temperature during those 10 years and that would be a remarkable gain right now.”

The path to sustainable economies and societies will have to overcome the existential threat that climate change poses, with the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report predicting that every region in the world will experience concurrent and multiples changes in climate impact drivers, such as more frequent rainfall, droughts and wildfires.

“These pale in comparison to the upheaval projected in coming decades,” Halimah Yacob, the Singaporean president, told ADSW attendees.

“However, tackling climate change is an immensely complex challenge and must go far beyond annual conferences. It requires a global response through ambitious plans, concrete action and resolute commitment from all countries, big and small — this is the only way we can close the emissions gap and reach our collective goal of a net-zero planet.”

Today, renewable and clean sources of energy supply only 20 percent of global power, with current projections estimating that renewable energy sources will form only 40 percent of total global generation by 2040.

What this signifies, according to Awaidha Murshed Ali Al-Marar, chairman of the Abu Dhabi Department of Energy, is that the world will still need to use fossil fuels for decades to come.

“Like with any serious disease, the treatment plan won’t be effective and long-lasting unless it incorporates essential lifestyle adjustments,” Al-Marar said in his remarks at ADSW. “It is critical that we form new regional and international partnerships.”

Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad Al-Khalifa, the Bahraini king’s representative for humanitarian works and youth affairs and president of the Bahrain Olympic Committee, said that with the deadline for achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals just eight years away, young people should have a seat at the climate table to ensure a greener future.

Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad Al-Khalifa, the Bahraini king’s representative for Humanitarian Works and Youth Affairs and President of the Bahrain Olympic Committee, said young people must have a seat at the climate table. (Supplied)

The world’s 1.8 billion young citizens will be worst affected by the climate crisis, and they are considered the most committed to change, armed with innovative ideas for effecting positive change for tomorrow, Al-Khalifa told ADSW.

“Youth are passionate, energetic, curious, committed, connected, knowledgeable and technologically equipped,” Al-Khalifa said.

“Without support, they cannot leverage these unique attributes to be the real game changers in creating a net-zero future. We must trust youth in the power to lead meaningful change.”

Bahrain has set up several initiatives to involve its youth in the process, in line with its Economic Vision 2030, Al-Khalifa said.

He expressed great hope in young people, describing them as malleable, resilient and tech-savvy. He said that they are early adopters, innovators and trendsetters. “All this makes them primed and prepped for innovation, disruption and catalysts of new thought and creative solutions,” the sheikh added.

“We see this positive ethos and youth culture spread across different sectors and spheres. As we chart our pathways for a greener future, youth will remain the driving force for socio-economic and cultural transformation across our communities.”

Despite the enormous commitment made in Glasgow at last year’s COP26, Kerry said the challenge today is to work with the remaining 35 percent and bring them on board as rapidly as possible to meet that goal.

“We know that the warming is going on at accelerated rates, particularly in the Arctic, where ice is melting much more rapidly and several times faster than anywhere else on the planet,” he said.

Awaidha Murshed Ali Al-Marar, chairman of the Abu Dhabi Department of Energy, addresses Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week. (Supplied)

“And as the ice melts, it opens up dark brackish ocean waters, which contain more heat and that accelerates warming. So, you have a negative feedback loop.”

With mudslides, storms and floods intensifying around the world, Kerry pointed out that when countries gather next year to assess their progress, thanks to the advantage of visibility through satellites, every country will be held accountable without the need to report.

“People are going to be able to measure what’s happening with deforestation and the carbon footprint of big corporations and countries,” he said. “We’ve made a big leap forward, but no one is moving fast enough. We are way behind in our retirement of coal power plants and in our efforts to stop leakage of methane and deploy renewable energy.”

In this race against time, however, the private sector will play a crucial role as Kerry believes no government can afford to accelerate such a transition on its own. Global efforts have identified over $100 trillion ready to be invested in new technologies related to clean energy, from battery storage, carbon capture, utilization and storage, smart grids and hydrogen.

Among the ADSW participants was Alok Sharma (L), the British minister and president of COP26, and Halimah Yacob (R), the Singaporean president. (Screenshots/ADSW)

“The reality is that it’s going to need a very significant amount of investment to effect this transition,” Kerry said. “Energy produces revenue, so we have to be creative about how we deploy that money.

“It is better to be investing in a big solar field or a new energy product that will produce revenue, rather than to leave your money sitting in a bank somewhere with net negative interests.”

Among the ADSW participants was Alok Sharma, the British minister and president of COP26, who arrived in the UAE from Egypt, where he met a wide range of government ministers, including Egypt’s COP president-designate, Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry.

Together they issued a UK-Egypt statement which affirmed their joint commitment to accelerating the fight against climate change during this decade.

Sharma’s first visits following COP26 will culminate in a meeting between Egypt, the UAE and Britain in Abu Dhabi, the first of a series of engagements between the countries in the lead-up to COP27 and COP28. 


Ankara examines alternative energy routes amid reported collapse of EastMed pipeline

Ankara examines alternative energy routes amid reported collapse of EastMed pipeline
Updated 20 January 2022

Ankara examines alternative energy routes amid reported collapse of EastMed pipeline

Ankara examines alternative energy routes amid reported collapse of EastMed pipeline
  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan: This project cannot happen. They (the US) carried out all the analyses, and they recognized that it had no positive sides
  • Experts say changing regional dynamics may open window of opportunity for Turkey to boost Israel energy ties

ANKARA: Amid reports that the US has withdrawn its support for the EastMed pipeline due to economic and environmental concerns, Ankara is poised to bring alternative energy sources to the table.

The EastMed project, which was expected to be completed by 2025, aimed at diminishing Europe’s dependence on Russian gas by annually carrying 10 billion cubic meters of gas from Israeli and Cypriot waters into the European gas network through the 1,900-km-long pipeline

Turkey has long rejected the EastMed project, which has the support of Greece, Cyprus and Israel. The Trump administration also backed the pipeline. 

During a visit to Albania on Jan. 18, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told reporters that the project “cannot work without Turkey.”

“This project cannot happen. They (the US) carried out all the analyses, and they recognized that it had no positive sides. In other words, the cost calculations didn’t add up, so it pulled its support.”

Amid discussions of a possible official visit from Israeli President Isaac Herzog, Erdogan said on Tuesday that Turkey and Israel had previously tried to cooperate on energy resources but that relevant negotiations had been never pushed far. 

“The US’s loss of interest in the EastMed pipeline is grounded principally on its shift of energy policy focus and secondarily on the multiple economic, geopolitical, technical and environmental challenges faced by the pipeline,” Madalina Sisu Vicari, an energy expert from the Eurasian Energy Chamber in Washington, told Arab News. 

“When it comes the East Mediterranean region’s energy, the US’s interest is now primarily on electricity interconnectors that can support both gas and renewable energy sources, such as the EuroAsia interconnector linking the Israeli, Cypriot and European electricity grids, and the EuroAfrica subsea electricity interconnector linking Egypt to Crete and Greece,” she added. 

According to Sisu Vicari, other players from the East Mediterranean region have begun fostering energy opportunities and projects beyond the field of natural gas, and these efforts could re-shape the region’s geopolitical environment.

“For instance, Egypt, Greece and Cyprus signed, in last October, two memoranda of cooperation on the interconnection for the transmission of electric power — one aiming to connect their electricity grids, another to link their power systems to Egypt’s via a subsea cable,” she said. 

“The latter interconnector will transmit power produced by renewables in North Africa to Europe, the first such infrastructure in the East Mediterranean,” she said. 

Sisu Vicari also noted that Washington’s shift of position on the EastMed pipeline might also determine mood swings from Israel, as the project is not compatible with the environmental goals declared by Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, who has pledged zero emissions by 2050. 

Experts note that changing regional dynamics may open a window of opportunity for Turkey to boost energy cooperation with Israel. 

As part of its efforts to mend ties with its former foes, Turkey has already signaled that it is prepared to carry the Israeli gas to Europe via its territories.

“We can sit down and discuss terms,” Erdogan said recently, adding that Turkey may use energy “as a tool for peace” if possible.

Sisu Vicari noted that whether such an energy deal would aim solely for the transportation of gas or encompass further areas of energy cooperation remains to be seen. 

“But an energy agreement would have important geopolitical implications not only for the bilateral relations between Turkey and Israel, but for the whole East Mediterranean region as well,” she said. 

Aydin Sezer, an Ankara-based energy expert, said it would not be feasible to launch a new pipeline if the authorities ever decide to initiate a joint project to carry gas to Europe through Turkish territories. 

“An Arab gas pipeline, a trans-regional gas pipeline meant to transfer natural gas, is already there. That pipeline, which will carry Egyptian natural gas to Europe by passing through Lebanon, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, is expected to be connected to Turkey when the Syrian grid is fully constructed and when the Homs-Aleppo segment is completed,” he told Arab News. 

The first segment of the Syria-Turkey connection of the Arab Gas Pipeline between Aleppo and the Turkish border town of Kilis has been already constructed.

But on the other hand, Turkish and Israeli energy ministers held intense negotiations in 2017 when the construction of a proposed pipeline between Turkey and Israel was on the table. 

“It was expected to be a 500-km-long pipeline and would pass through maritime zones of Cyprus or Syria or both for carrying gas from Leviathan to Europe via Turkish territories,” Sezer said. 

“Beyond its international maritime law aspects, Turkish companies found this project too costly and not financially feasible.

“But the northern flank of Egypt hosts significant gas reserves, which should encourage Turkey to focus on that area rather than building new lines,” Sezer said. 

According to Sezer, any new gas project with Israel could further harm fragile regional relations, and could be used by Tehran as a pretext to halt gas flow to Turkey, especially under harsh winter conditions. 

Iran cut gas flows to Turkey on Wednesday, allegedly due to a technical failure, prompting several experts to question whether it was a reaction by Tehran against Herzog’s anticipated visit to Turkey.


Turkey, Qatar reached preliminary deal on Kabul airport security -Turkish sources

Turkey, Qatar reached preliminary deal on Kabul airport security -Turkish sources
Updated 20 January 2022

Turkey, Qatar reached preliminary deal on Kabul airport security -Turkish sources

Turkey, Qatar reached preliminary deal on Kabul airport security -Turkish sources
  • Kabul's international airport is landlocked Afghanistan's main air link to the world
  • Sources told reporters on Thursday that Ankara and Doha had agreed on a security framework for the airport mission

ANKARA: Turkey and Qatar have reached agreement on ensuring security at Kabul’s main airport should they be awarded the mission amid ongoing talks with the Taliban government, Turkish diplomatic sources said on Thursday.
Kabul’s international airport is landlocked Afghanistan’s main air link to the world. Following the August takeover of Afghanistan by Taliban, Turkey has said it would be open to operating it with Qatar but only if its security demands are met.
Reuters has reported that the United Arab Emirates also held talks with the Taliban to keep the airport operational.
The sources told reporters on Thursday that Ankara and Doha had agreed on a security framework for the airport mission, but added talks continued on other aspects such as financing.
“It is expected for the Taliban to ensure security outside, and for whoever runs the airport to ensure it inside,” one of the sources said. “The process is continuing constructively,” the person said on condition of anonymity.
They added that a delegation of Turkish and Qatari officials were holding talks on the issue in Kabul this week.
Qatar’s state news agency said the Taliban government will be in Doha next week to complete discussions with Qatar and Turkey over the operation and management of the airport.
It added that delegations from Qatar and Turkey have held two days of “intense negotiations” in Kabul this week over control of the airport.
Qatar — which helped run the airport along with Turkey after playing a major role in evacuation efforts following the chaotic US withdrawal in August — say that Ankara, Doha, and the Taliban have agreed that discussions are going to be completed next week.
Qatar’s role at the Kabul airport has ensured that flights have operated between Doha and Kabul since September, allowing Qatar to become a hub for countries to maintain links to Afghanistan and to meet the Taliban government. The United States, United Kingdom, Canada and several other countries have moved their Afghanistan embassies to Qatar.
On Wednesday, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said Turkey was sending 700 tons of emergency aid and supplies to Afghanistan, without providing a date.


Biden stance on restoring Houthis to terror list welcomed

Biden stance on restoring Houthis to terror list welcomed
Updated 20 January 2022

Biden stance on restoring Houthis to terror list welcomed

Biden stance on restoring Houthis to terror list welcomed
  • Emirati Embassy: “Case is clear — launching ballistic and cruise missiles against civilian targets, sustaining aggression, diverting aid to Yemeni people”
  • The coalition has announced launching a large-scale military operation in Yemen to neutralize the military capabilities of the Houthis

AL-MUKALLA: US President Joe Biden has said his administration is considering re-designating Yemen’s Houthi militia as an international terrorist organization following the group’s drone and missile attacks on the UAE.

His comment at a news conference came shortly after the Emirati Embassy said on Twitter that UAE Ambassador Yousef Al Otaiba urged the Biden administration to restore the designation in response to Monday’s strikes on Abu Dhabi airport and a fuel depot.

Asked if he supported returning the Iran-backed Houthis to the US list of foreign terrorist organizations, from which they were removed nearly a year ago, Biden replied, “The answer is, it’s under consideration.”

But he conceded that “it’s going to be very difficult” to end the conflict.

Biden’s comment reflected the lack of progress toward ending the war since he launched an initiative shortly after taking office a year ago to bolster UN efforts to restart peace talks.

The UAE welcomed Biden’s comment, with the Emirati Embassy writing on Twitter: “Case is clear — launching ballistic and cruise missiles against civilian targets, sustaining aggression, diverting aid to Yemeni people.”

Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador to Yemen Mohammed Al-Jaber said on Twitter on Thursday that the UN and the global community must not show leniency and must instead hold the Houthi movement accountable because “it encourages other terrorist organizations to act similarly.”

Yemeni government officials and analysts on Thursday also welcomed Biden’s stance.

Najeeb Ghallab, an undersecretary at the Information Ministry, told Arab News that the US administration has realized that the delisting of the Houthi movement as a terrorist group has neither led to activating diplomatic efforts to end the war nor contributed to alleviating the humanitarian crisis.

“The Houthis have foiled practically all diplomatic efforts and aggravated the humanitarian crisis. It appeared to the Americans that the Houthis are exploiting the humanitarian crisis to prolong the war,” Ghallab said, adding that the Houthi missile, drone and ground attacks inside and outside Yemen have increased by 400 percent since early last year when Biden’s administration removed the Houthis from the terror list.

In 2021, the Houthis renewed a military offensive to seize control of the oil-rich city of Marib that has claimed the lives of thousands of people and displaced thousands of families.

“The designation would strike the Iran-allied wing within the movement and would push them into reviewing their decisions. If the Americans seek to rescue Yemen and protect regional and international security, they should designate the Houthis as a terrorist organization,” Ghallab said.

The Coalition to Restore Legitimacy in Yemen vowed on Thursday to hunt down the Houthi leaders responsible for masterminding deadly strikes in Yemen, Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

The coalition announced launching a large-scale military operation in Yemen to neutralize the military capabilities of the Houthis, pledging to track down Houthi leaders who staged missile and drone strikes inside and outside Yemen.

“We are tracking terrorist leaders responsible for targeting civilians,” the coalition said, adding that it launched 21 airstrikes in the province of Marib that killed 60 Houthis during the past 24 hours.

The coalition has stepped up airstrikes against Houthi military targets across Yemen, hitting military facilities in Sanaa and Dhamar and destroying weapons depots in the western city of Hodeidah during the past 24 hours.

Residents in Houthi-held Sanaa on Wednesday night reported hearing thunderous explosions as the coalition’s warplanes targeted military camps and other military facilities inside and on the capital’s northern outskirts.

The coalition’s warplanes also struck Houthi military reinforcements and gatherings in Marib, enabling government troops to push back the militia’s attacks.

Fighting intensified on key battlefields in Marib as the Houthis renewed attacks on government troops.

Local officials and media reports said that the Houthis attacked government troops in areas south of Marib in a bid to seize back strategic mountains from loyalists and break a siege on their forces on the Al-Balaq Al-Sharqi mountain range.

With the help of coalition warplanes, government troops repelled the Houthi attacks after killing and wounding dozens of them.

The Giants Brigades also foiled Houthi counterattacks on the outskirts of Hareb town, south of Marib.

In the northern province of Saada, the Houthi movement’s heartland, Yemen’s Defense Ministry on Thursday announced expelling the Houthis from a number of locations in Al-Safra district, west of Saada, shortly after launching an attack to liberate new areas in the province.

Local media reports said on Thursday that the death toll from the Houthi missile attack on a fuel station in an area between Marib and Shabwa rose to four after the death of two critically wounded civilians.

On Wednesday, a missile fired by the Houthis landed at a fuel station, east of Hareb, triggering an explosion that killed two people and critically wounded several others. Another missile launched by the Houthis ripped through a school on Wednesday in the southern city of Taiz, killing a student and wounding five more.