Cairo International Book Fair to run from June 30 to July 15

Cairo International Book Fair to run from June 30 to July 15
Egypt's Minister of Culture Enas Abdel-Dayem (L) during a news conference for Cairo International Book Fair in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2021. (REUTERS)
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Updated 24 June 2021

Cairo International Book Fair to run from June 30 to July 15

Cairo International Book Fair to run from June 30 to July 15
  • “The maximum number of entries will be 100,000 visitors per day, and no one will be allowed to enter once we hit that number,” said Haitham Al-Haj Ali, head of the General Book Authority

CAIRO: Despite the challenges of the coronavirus disease pandemic, the 52nd Cairo International Book Fair will run from June 30 to July 15, it was announced on Tuesday.
The Egyptian Ministry of Culture said the exhibition, under the slogan “Reading is Life,” will be held at the Egypt International Exhibition Center, covering an area of 40,000 square meters.
There will be 675 pavilions and 1,218 publishers, as well as foreign publishing agencies representing 25 countries.
The fair will launch the “Your Book, Your Culture” initiative, which encourages citizens to buy books and urges them to read.
The prices of books will range from 1 Egyptian pound ($0.064) to 20 pounds.
Enas Abdel Dayem, minister of culture, said that holding the fair this year was a challenge, describing this year’s event as “an exceptional one” and a clear indication of the Egyptian leadership’s keenness to encourage reading and publishing.
“We are entering a new era of digitization transformation and development. This year’s exhibition is the largest gathering of publishers in the world,” she claimed.
Abdel Dayem said entry will be free this year, and that prices will remain fixed, adding that the idea to increase the number of days for the fair would support the publishing industry.
“The maximum number of entries will be 100,000 visitors per day, and no one will be allowed to enter once we hit that number,” said Haitham Al-Haj Ali, head of the General Book Authority.
He said facilities have been made to accommodate people with special needs, which can be requested and booked electronically.


Oman adjusts electricity tariffs to ease burden on citizens

Oman adjusts electricity tariffs to ease burden on citizens
Updated 3 min 28 sec ago

Oman adjusts electricity tariffs to ease burden on citizens

Oman adjusts electricity tariffs to ease burden on citizens
DUBAI: Oman has adjusted its electricity tariffs structure to offer consumers on lower rates more supply, a government official said on Monday, following consumer complaints about steep summer bills.
Household energy costs are sensitive in a country that recently saw protests over unemployment.
The government also wants to keep the public onside as the Gulf state’s ruling sultan, who assumed power last year, continues to push through reforms to ease pressure on public finances in the debt-burdened state. They include a value-added tax, introduced in April, and overhauling an expensive subsidies system.
A Public Services Regulation Authority official told a news briefing that after receiving over 5,000 complaints, authorities had decided to expand consumption categories for households in a move that would be applied retroactively to cover May and June.
Under the adjustment, consumers paying a tariff of 12 baisas ($0.03) per kilowatt/hour (kw/h) will now be able to get up to 4,000 kw/h of electricity, up from a previous cap of 2,000 kw/h.
Consumers paying a tariff of 16 baisas per kw/h will now be able to get up to 6,000 kw/h, against up to 4,000 kw/h previously.
“Most citizens fall under these two segments,” Authority head Mansoor Al-Hinai told reporters.
He said the body has instructed licensed firms to restore services cut off due to late bill payments during the summer.
Protests in May by hundreds of Omanis seeking employment had subsided after Sultan Haitham bin Tariq Al-Said, facing his biggest challenge yet, ordered acceleration of government plans to create thousands of jobs and amid a security crackdown.

Twitter partners with AP, Reuters to battle misinformation on its site

Twitter partners with AP, Reuters to battle misinformation on its site
Updated 10 min 45 sec ago

Twitter partners with AP, Reuters to battle misinformation on its site

Twitter partners with AP, Reuters to battle misinformation on its site
  • Twitter will partner with AP and Reuters to provide credible information on the platform and combat the spread of misinformation
  • Twitter said it will collaborate with the newswires during breaking news events to add accurate context
LONDON: Twitter Inc. will partner with the Associated Press and Reuters to more quickly provide credible information on the social networking site as part of an effort to fight the spread of misinformation, it said on Monday.
Like other social media companies, the San Francisco-based firm has been under pressure to remove misleading or false information on its site. Earlier this year Twitter launched a program called Birdwatch, asking its users to help identify and fact-check misleading tweets.
Twitter said it will collaborate with the newswires during breaking news events to add accurate context, which could appear in various places on Twitter, such as a label attached to tweets about the event or as a “Moment,” which curates information about trending topics on Twitter.
The partnerships mark the first time Twitter will formally collaborate with news organizations to elevate accurate information on its site, a Twitter spokesperson said.
The spokesperson added Twitter will work separately with both the AP and Reuters, a division of information services company Thomson Reuters Corp, and the newswires will not interact with each other.
“Trust, accuracy and impartiality are at the heart of what Reuters does every day ... those values also drive our commitment to stopping the spread of misinformation,” Hazel Baker, global head of UGC (user-generated content) newsgathering at Reuters, said in a statement.
Tom Januszewski, vice president of global business development at the AP, said: “We are particularly excited about leveraging AP’s scale and speed to add context to online conversations, which can benefit from easy access to the facts.”

US to evacuate journalists, aid workers from Afghanistan

Afghan interpreters at a protest in Kabul, Afghanistan, before the beginning of the U.S. troop withdrawal in April. (File/Getty Images)
Afghan interpreters at a protest in Kabul, Afghanistan, before the beginning of the U.S. troop withdrawal in April. (File/Getty Images)
Updated 15 min 18 sec ago

US to evacuate journalists, aid workers from Afghanistan

Afghan interpreters at a protest in Kabul, Afghanistan, before the beginning of the U.S. troop withdrawal in April. (File/Getty Images)
  • The Biden administration expands efforts to evacuate at-risk Afghan citizens and give them refugee status in the US
  • Afghans eligible for asylum now include current and former employees of US-based news organizations, US-based aid and development agencies and other relief groups

WASHINGTON: The Biden administration on Monday expanded its efforts to evacuate at-risk Afghan citizens from Afghanistan as Taliban violence increases ahead there of the US military pullout at the end of the month.
The State Department said it is widening the scope of Afghans eligible for refugee status in United States to include current and former employees of US-based news organizations, US-based aid and development agencies and other relief groups that receive US funding. Current and former employees of the US government and the NATO military operation who don’t meet the criteria for a dedicated program for such workers are also covered.
However, the move comes with a major caveat: applicants must leave Afghanistan to begin the adjudication process that may take 12-14 months in a third country, and the US does not intend to support their departures or stays there.
Nevertheless, the State Department said the move will mean that “many thousands” of Afghans and their immediate families will now have the opportunity to be permanently resettled in the US as refugees. It did not offer a more specific number of those who might be eligible for the program.
“The US objective remains a peaceful, secure Afghanistan,” it said in a statement. “However, in light of increased levels of Taliban violence, the US government is working to provide certain Afghans, including those who worked with the United States, the opportunity for refugee resettlement to the United States.”
The creation of a “Priority 2” category for Afghans within the US Refugee Admissions Program is intended for Afghans and their immediate families who “may be at risk due to their US affiliation” but aren’t able to get a Special Immigrant Visa because they did not work directly for the US government or didn’t hold their government jobs long enough.
To qualify for the Priority 2 category, Afghans must be nominated by a US government agency or by the most senior civilian US citizen employee of a U.S-based media outlet or nongovernmental organization.
The first group of Afghan Special Immigrant Visa applicants — most of whom served as translators or did other work for US troops or diplomats — who have cleared security vetting arrived in the US on Friday. That group of 221 people are among 2,500 who will be brought to the US in the coming days.
Another 4,000 SIV applicants, plus their families, who have not yet cleared the security screening are expected to be relocated to third countries ahead of the completion of the US withdrawal. Roughly 20,000 Afghans have expressed interest in the program.


Cryptocurrency promise for UAE’s unbanked migrants — but not yet

Cryptocurrency promise for UAE’s unbanked migrants — but not yet
Updated 15 min 48 sec ago

Cryptocurrency promise for UAE’s unbanked migrants — but not yet

Cryptocurrency promise for UAE’s unbanked migrants — but not yet
  • Migrants face high fees, long wait times to send money
  • Regulations on crypto assets still needed, experts say

DUBAI: Every month, 24-year-old parking attendant Ramesh Giri waits outside a money transfer office in Dubai to send $600 in cash to support his parents and two brothers in Nepal.
He dreads the routine, which costs him up to $7 each time and is keeping him from saving enough to fulfil his aspiration of becoming a restaurateur – but that could all change in the weeks ahead.
Dubai and the rest of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is moving closer to opening licensed cryptocurrency exchanges, a step that could boost financial inclusion for the millions of expatriates who make up most of the region’s workforce.
Using online wallets, migrants could one day be able to send remittances home with smaller fees — or none at all — and within minutes, skipping the long waits in the Gulf’s heat and humidity.
“It’s free,” said Giri, who has been learning about cryptocurrencies and, along with the speed and savings, sees the added potential of letting him keep track of his finances more easily on his smartphone.
“I hope it can help me see what’s happening with my money and be able to save — because I can’t right now,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

‘NO THRESHOLD’
According to the World Bank, about 1.7 billion adults around the world did not have bank accounts as of 2017 – more than a quarter of them in India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
Many of those countries are among the top senders of migrant workers to the Gulf, where they work in construction, the hospitality industry or domestic work to send money back home to their families.
Government data show that out of the UAE’s population of more than 9 million, nearly 80 percent are expats.
Last year, the region sent $43 billion in remittances, making it the world’s second-highest sender after the United States, according to the Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development (KNOMAD).
The global think tank said the remittance industry makes up about 12 percent of the Emirates’ gross domestic product.
The UAE’s path toward digitising the industry began last year, when its Securities and Commodities Authority stipulated that anyone offering crypto assets in the Emirates must be formally licensed and comply with a range of anti-money laundering, cybersecurity and data protection laws.
So far, six companies have qualified under the regulations to create crypto exchanges, with two reaching the first stages of going live.
One of those, MidChains, is a crypto asset trading platform based in Abu Dhabi and is preparing to launch for trading.
Technically, the platform will be open to everyone. “There is no earnings threshold,” said MidChains co-founder and chief executive officer Basil Al Askari.
But he acknowledged that the documentation clients need to provide to meet regulations, including proof of residence, income and secure assets, means migrant workers will likely be shut out.
Askari said he hoped remittances will one day be a regular feature of the UAE’s cryptocurrency services.
“If you’re talking about finance and banking for the unbanked ... that’s where we want the technology to lead,” he said.
For now, though, access to cryptocurrency in the region will mainly be limited to trading firms, hedge fund investors and high-net-worth individuals. “It doesn’t really help (migrant workers) because they might not be able to go through the compliance requirements in order to open accounts,” Askari said.

PROTECTING DIGITAL ASSETS
Before cryptocurrency takes hold in the UAE, authorities need to boost awareness among users on how to safeguard their digital assets, said George Kuruvila, a partner at Fotis International Law Firm.
So far this year, Dubai residents have lost nearly $22 million in cryptocurrency scams, according to figures from the Dubai Police.
Kuruvila, whose firm advises clients in Dubai on financial technology regulations, says younger generations will be the first to learn how to trust cryptocurrencies and use them more securely.
“That same change is going to happen with migrant workers, but it’s not going to happen as fast,” he said, describing the demographic as more cautious with their money.
“It will happen in the next five to 10 years,” he added.
Part of that is due to one risk the UAE cannot mitigate, he said — the volatility of digital currencies.
Bitcoin, for example, had one of its most volatile months in May 2021, first increasing steadily before losing 35 percent of its value.
“Let’s say somebody puts all of their savings into bitcoin today. No one can guarantee that it won’t crash tomorrow. There is no regulator for that,” said Kuruvila.
Such highs and lows could be disastrous for anyone sending small amounts in remittances.
“When it comes to migrant workers, it’s their everyday bread and butter,” he said.
That volatility has already put off Emma Ogode, a Kenyan working in the hospitality industry in Dubai.
“I see it as betting money — you have to put in a certain amount. Then maybe you win, (but) if you don’t, you will have to put in more. Then, all your finances will go away,” said Ogode, 32.
She said she spends about a day every month calling different remittance offices to find the best exchange rates and transfer fees, before inevitably waiting in a long line to send money home.
But for her, cryptocurrency is not the answer.
“I don’t trust it,” she said.


Chefs Fariyal Abdullahi, Nasim Alikhani to dish up dinner for this year’s Met Gala

Chefs Fariyal Abdullahi, Nasim Alikhani to dish up dinner for this year’s Met Gala
The menu for this year's Met Gala is a collective effort by10 New York-based chefs. Supplied
Updated 36 min 47 sec ago

Chefs Fariyal Abdullahi, Nasim Alikhani to dish up dinner for this year’s Met Gala

Chefs Fariyal Abdullahi, Nasim Alikhani to dish up dinner for this year’s Met Gala

DUBAI: For the first time, the Met Gala is introducing a sustainable plant-based menu for its annual event taking place this year on Sept. 13, 2021. 

Guests will be treated to a healthy dinner curated by a group of 10 notable New York-based chefs and Instagram influencers, handpicked by Ethiopian-Swedish chef Marcus Samuelsson and Bon Appétit.

Among the chefs selected is US-Ethiopian Fariyal Abdullahi and American-Iranian Nasim Alikhani.

Abdullahi is the culinary manager of R+D Kitchen in Dallas, while Alikhani spearheads a hot spot in Brooklyn, New York, called Sofreh.

They join other New York-based chefs, cookbook authors and culinary enthusiasts Emma Bengtsson, Lazarus Lynch, Junghyun Park, Erik Ramirez, Thomas Raquel, Sophia Roe, Simone Tong and Fabian von Hauske.

“I am honored to participate in an initiative that highlights the incredible work of these 10 New York chefs at the Met Gala,” said Samuelsson in a press release issued from the Met. 

“After a difficult two years for the restaurant industry, this will showcase the work and tell the stories of a dynamic group of chefs while presenting an exciting menu of delicious, plant-based dishes. The gala offers an incomparable opportunity for emerging talent to elevate their careers and share their perspectives and craft.”

In the weeks leading up to the gala, the 10 chefs will share plant-based recipes via Instagram Reels, powered by a partnership with the photo-sharing social media platform.

The Met Gala is an annual fundraising gala that celebrates New York’s the Costume Institute’s new exhibition on a changing theme. It typically occurs on the first Monday in May, however, due to COVID-19, it is set to take place as a smaller affair on Sept. 13.