IHC’s Alpha Dhabi to list on ADX with $2.72bn paid-in-capital

IHC’s Alpha Dhabi to list on ADX with $2.72bn paid-in-capital
IHC took a 45 percent stake in Alpha Dhabi in April. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 25 June 2021

IHC’s Alpha Dhabi to list on ADX with $2.72bn paid-in-capital

IHC’s Alpha Dhabi to list on ADX with $2.72bn paid-in-capital
  • Abu Dhabi IPO slated for June 27

ABU DHABI: Alpha Dhabi Holding (ADH) announced its intention to proceed with an IPO and listing of its ordinary shares on the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange (ADX) on Sunday 27th June with 10 billion Emirati dirhams ($2.72 billion) paid-in capital, WAM reported.

The offering is expected to involve a sale of existing shares to individuals and other investors in the UAE and to qualified institutional and other investors.

“We have made the journey to become a public company in a way that’s going to have a positive reflection on our growth plan, and as a public company we will have a stronger capital structure to invest in additional verticals, expand commercially and accelerate growth both organically and through acquisitions,” said ADH Chairman Mohamed Thani Murshed Al Rumaithi.

IHC acquired a 45 percent stake purchase in ADH in April.

“We invested in Alpha Dhabi in early 2021 and we have used our sector experience to reorganize, integrate and transform Alpha Dhabi into a leading UAE holding company with special focus on construction and hospitality,” said Syed Basar Shueb, CEO IHC.

“The business is growing fast, highlighted by the 30 percent jump in first quarter revenue and gaining a listing on a major stock exchange will enhance its already strong platform and reputation. We are delighted to have supported its management team to deliver on its Abu Dhabi Stock Exchange IPO,” he said.

Incorporated in 2013, Alpha Dhabi operates across five industries, including health care, construction and hospitality. The company’s investment portfolio, local and international, includes 25 subsidiaries and 40,000 employees active in different fields.


Transport problems holding back $2-a-kg hydrogen fuel, says Aramco's technology chief

Transport problems holding back $2-a-kg hydrogen fuel, says Aramco's technology chief
Updated 22 sec ago

Transport problems holding back $2-a-kg hydrogen fuel, says Aramco's technology chief

Transport problems holding back $2-a-kg hydrogen fuel, says Aramco's technology chief

RIYADH: Low-carbon hydrogen can be produced at a cost of $2 per kg but the issue is transporting the fuel to where it is needed, according to the chief technology officer of Aramco.

Speaking at the Future Investment Initiative Forum in Riyad, Ahmad Al Khowaiter said the technology for capturing the gas has proven itself reliable “over many years” and is “at scale today”.

Khowaiter claimed that hydrogen is the only option in “many of the harder to decarbonise sectors” as the world seeks to drastically reduce its carbon footprint.

He confirmed that Aramco, the Saudi-state owned oil and gas company, has been operating its own production pilot with the capacity for 800,000 tonnes a year of hydrogen for the last six years with “no problems, no challenges”.

“I really do believe that technology is mature, the cost structures are very compatible with the competitive energy costs that are needed for hydrogen” he told delegates at the conference, adding: “It really does allow, for example, low carbon hydrogen to be produced today at scale with very competitive costs.”

Khowaiter went on: “The challenge with hydrogen is transport, so the big challenge is converting it to something that can be transported or compressing it in transport. 

“At the point of production we’re talking $1.5 to £2 a kg range, which is far below alternatives for now, as the alternatives have to scale up.”

 


Before Lebanon's current financial crisis, central bank faced a $4.7 billion hole in reserves: IMF memo

Before Lebanon's current financial crisis, central bank faced a $4.7 billion hole in reserves: IMF memo
A member of the Lebanese security forces stands at the entrance of the Central Bank after anti-government protesters broke down a construction barrier. Getty Images
Updated 11 min 37 sec ago

Before Lebanon's current financial crisis, central bank faced a $4.7 billion hole in reserves: IMF memo

Before Lebanon's current financial crisis, central bank faced a $4.7 billion hole in reserves: IMF memo
  • One of the deepest depressions in modern history, has propelled 74 percent of the population into poverty

Lebanon's central bank had a $4.7 billion hole in its reserves by the end of 2015 that was not disclosed to the public, an early warning sign of the financial collapse that has since all but wiped out many people's savings.


The figure is contained in an April 2016 report drawn up for Lebanese financial authorities by the International Monetary Fund and seen by Reuters.


The confidential report, known as an aide memoire, said that while the gross reserves of the Banque Du Liban central bank (BdL) were high at $36.5 billion, "reserves net of the commercial banks' claims on BdL and gold were negative USD 4.7 billion in December 2015".


Lebanon's central bank has been headed by Riad Salameh since 1993. In late 2016, it began what it called "financial engineering" - funding a ballooning fiscal deficit and keeping banks buoyant by paying ever higher interest rates for dollars.


By the time investor confidence wore out amid civil protests against the ruling elite in 2019, the central bank's losses had multiplied.


Three people with knowledge of the matter said Salameh himself had insisted to IMF officials that the figure not be published by the IMF on the grounds it would destabilise the financial market.


Asked why the negative net reserves figure was not published in a January 2017 IMF report, a central bank spokesperson, speaking on behalf of Salameh, said "the central bank does not have the power to change IMF reports" and declined to elaborate further on that point.


"The misrepresentation of the causes of the crisis to concentrate (blame) on the BdL is unprofessional and being used to throw responsibility onto one institution, the only civil institution still keeping the (financial) system alive despite the acute crisis," the spokesperson added.


An IMF spokesperson, asked by Reuters why the figure was left out of published reports and whether the Fund should have been more proactive in demanding remedial action, declined to specifically address the omission of the $4.7 billion, but said the report "provided an early warning as well as possible solutions to strengthen the financial system".


"It emphasized the need to reduce economic and financial risks, including the reliance on new deposit inflows to cover large fiscal and external deficits," the spokesperson said. "It also pointed to significant resources that would be needed to ensure banks remained capitalized in the event of a severe shock."


When foreign exchange inflows dried up in 2019, the banks, many of them with leading politicians as shareholders, shut depositors out of their accounts. Withdrawals have since been limited, mostly made in Lebanese pounds which have lost 90 per cent of their value.

By 2020 the central bank deficit had grown to $50 billion with total bank losses to $83 billion, according to a rescue plan prepared by the finance ministry in April that year. Both the central bank and the banking association dispute these figures but have not publicly given alternatives.


A forensic audit of the central bank is a condition for Lebanon to secure an urgent IMF rescue package.

The audit resumed last week after an almost year-long hiatus due to disagreements over access to information.


The crisis, described by the World Bank as one of the deepest depressions in modern history, has propelled 74 percent of the population into poverty, according to the United Nations.


"The social impact, which is already dire, could become catastrophic," the World Bank said in April. Even during Lebanon's 1975-1990 civil war, the banks remained solvent and functional.


Salameh has repeatedly said he was acting only to buy time for Lebanese politicians to agree reforms to cut the budget deficit and that it was not his fault that they failed to do so.


Asked if the IMF had a duty to be more proactive in pushing for the $4.7 billion negative net reserves figure to be published, the IMF spokesperson referred Reuters to the fund's transparency rules.


These say that a country may ask for non-public material to be removed from a report if it is: "Highly market-sensitive material, mainly the Fund's views on the outlook for exchange rates, interest rates, the financial sector, and assessments of sovereign liquidity and solvency."


The IMF spokesman declined to say whether Lebanon specifically made this request and also did not address whether there is a formal limit on the size of net reserves.


Earlier this year, Swiss authorities launched an investigation into "aggravated money laundering in connection with possible embezzlement to the detriment of the Banque du Liban (central bank)".

Salameh has denied any wrongdoing and said the investigation is part of a campaign against him.


Swiss newspaper Le Temps first reported earlier this month that key information had been kept out of the public eye by the central bank in 2015. The central bank had said the report "had nothing to do with the truth".


Sony ekes out 1% Q2 profit rise as PS5 costs squeeze margins

Sony ekes out 1% Q2 profit rise as PS5 costs squeeze margins
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Updated 50 min 19 sec ago

Sony ekes out 1% Q2 profit rise as PS5 costs squeeze margins

Sony ekes out 1% Q2 profit rise as PS5 costs squeeze margins
  • Sony ekes out 1% Q2 profit rise as PS5 costs squeeze margins

Japan's Sony Group Corp on Thursday squeezed out a surprise 1 percent rise in operating profit for its second quarter though costs from growing sales of its PlayStation 5 (PS5) console pressed on margins.


Weaker profitability in the key games segment could also not stop the group hiking its full-year operating forecast by 6 percent to 1 trillion yen ($8.81 billion) from its August forecast, driven by expected profit growth in areas including movies, music and electronics.


Sony said it has sold a cumulative 13.4 million units PS5 units since launch last November. That contributed to a 27 percent year-on-year jump in sales at its gaming unit, though profit was less robust as the conglomerate sold hardware below cost.


Game console makers frequently sell new devices below manufacturing cost as they build an install base for software sales. Sony said sales of first-party titles fell, though sales from other developers grew.


Sony aims to sell 14.8 million PS5 consoles this financial year - a target that takes into account the global semiconductor shortage.


Sony reported group profit of 318.5 billion yen for July-September. That compared with the 222 billion yen average of six analyst estimates compiled by Refinitiv.


The conglomerate - spanning areas such as entertainment, sensors and financial services - switched to IFRS accounting standards from U.S. GAAP in the current financial year.


Sony also said it is considering partnering Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd in its plans to build a chip plant in Japan, amid a corporate scramble to secure long-term stable semiconductor supply.


Across its business, Sony is enmeshed in a global battle for consumer attention as entertainment giants look beyond the United States for growth and mine non-English-language creators for content.


In a blow to Sony's pop culture credentials, South Korea's top cultural export, boy band BTS, said last week it has dropped its Columbia Records label for a deal with Universal Music Group NV.


Other challenges include an investor attempt to oust the management of India's Zee Entertainment Enterprises Ltd , casting a shadow over merger talks with Sony's local unit.


Stellantis Q3 sales down 14% as chip crisis cuts output by 600,000

Stellantis Q3 sales down 14% as chip crisis cuts output by 600,000
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Updated 59 min 38 sec ago

Stellantis Q3 sales down 14% as chip crisis cuts output by 600,000

Stellantis Q3 sales down 14% as chip crisis cuts output by 600,000
  • Shipments fell 27 percent year on year on a pro-forma basis in the third quarter to 1.131 million units

Stellantis, the world's fourth largest automaker, on Thursday reported a 14 percent fall in third-quarter revenue on a pro-forma basis after semiconductor shortages cut planned quarterly production by 30 percent or 600,000 vehicles.


Revenue amounted to 32.551 billion euros ($37.8 billion), short of analyst expectations of 33.02 billion euros in a Reuters poll.


"The level of chip shortage was probably slightly higher that what we had expected when we last spoke to the market in August," Chief Financial Officer Richard Palmer said, adding the full-year total toll of lost production would top a previous forecast of 1.4 million units.


Palmer however said the company was seeing a "moderate" improvement in chip supply in October and expected that trend to continue through the fourth quarter.


"Visibility on semiconductors continues to be a difficult subject for the industry," Palmer added.


Shipments fell 27 percent year on year on a pro-forma basis in the third quarter to 1.131 million units.


Lower volumes more than offset an improved vehicle mix and positive net pricing following recent vehicle launches, including new electrified vehicles, the company said.


Palmer said Stellantis forecasts a moderate improvement in shipments in the final quarter of this year.


"We see positive pricing across all regions," the CFO said, adding he saw good progress on post-merger synergies and cost management.


The carmaker, formed at the beginning of this year through the merger of Fiat Chrysler and France's PSA, confirmed its full-year target for an adjusted operating profit margin of around 10 percent.


The forecast, which was raised in August, assumes no further deterioration in semiconductor supply and no further significant lockdowns in Europe or the United States.


Stellantis, however, revised its full-year industry growth outlook for some regions, lowering them for North America, South America and the enlarged Europe area, while improving them for the Middle East and Africa region. It kept them unchanged for India, the Asia Pacific and China.


Gold demand drops 7% annually as ETF outflows gain traction

Gold demand drops 7% annually as ETF outflows gain traction
Updated 28 October 2021

Gold demand drops 7% annually as ETF outflows gain traction

Gold demand drops 7% annually as ETF outflows gain traction
  • Net sales for gold ETF placed overall gold demand into a year-on-year decline, despite demand increasing in all other sectors

Demand for gold drops 7 percent annually in the third quarter of 2021 as outflows from gold-backed exchange-traded funds (gold ETFs), according to the World Gold Council’s latest Gold Demand Trends report. 

Net sales for gold ETF placed overall gold demand into a year-on-year decline, despite demand increasing in all other sectors, the report showed. 

Consumer purchases of gold jewellery increased 300 percent year-on-year to 443 tonnes.

Meanwhile bars and coins, which are famous for retail investors, saw a fifth consecutive quarter of year-on-year gains in the same period.

Gold used in technology grew 9 percent year-on-year, and central banks added 69 tonnes to their reserves. 

“The relatively modest outflows from gold ETFs have had a disproportionate effect on this year’s figures, outweighing positivity almost everywhere else across the board,” Louise Street, senior markets analyst at the World Gold Council said. 

Street expects the demand will be the same for the rest of the year, “strong consumer and central bank will mitigate losses from ETFs.”

“Jewellery demand will continue to exceed last year’s levels, but investment demand in total will be weaker in 2021, despite healthy bar and coin demand,” he added.