Saudi Arabia’s Ithra hosts interactive exhibit on environmental sustainability

Terra was first exhibited in New York City at Arcadia Earth, a next-generation art exhibition and extended reality experience designed to reignite the conversation around the most pressing environmental issues. (AN photos by Huda Bashatah)
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Terra was first exhibited in New York City at Arcadia Earth, a next-generation art exhibition and extended reality experience designed to reignite the conversation around the most pressing environmental issues. (AN photos by Huda Bashatah)
Saudi Arabia’s Ithra hosts interactive exhibit on environmental sustainability
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Terra was first exhibited in New York City at Arcadia Earth, a next-generation art exhibition and extended reality experience designed to reignite the conversation around the most pressing environmental issues. (AN photos by Huda Bashatah)
Saudi Arabia’s Ithra hosts interactive exhibit on environmental sustainability
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Terra parades impactful optical illusions and immersive and interactive technologies provided by META, an international experience product company. (AN photos by Huda Bashatah)
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Updated 15 July 2021

Saudi Arabia’s Ithra hosts interactive exhibit on environmental sustainability

Saudi Arabia’s Ithra hosts interactive exhibit on environmental sustainability
  • Terra, which means “fertile soil” in Arabic, aims to educate visitors on the perilous impact of humans on the planet and will be open until September
  • Exhibit debuted in New York City and then found its way to Ithra in Dhahran through the center’s collaboration with Arcadia Earth

JEDDAH: As Saudi Arabia is heading towards achieving an environmentally friendly and better future for the planet, many are inspired to promote sustainability such as the King Abdul Aziz Center for World Culture (Ithra).

The latest exhibit at the Ithra Museum, Terra, which means “fertile soil” in Arabic, aims to educate visitors on the perilous impact of humans on the planet as well as inspire conversations on the topic.

“This is not a political movement,” Farah Suhail Abushullaih, head of the Ithra Museum, told Arab News.

“It ignites curiosity and understanding for a world issue through creativity and art. It examines this relationship between humans and earth and allows visitors to reflect on their abilities to make positive impacts on the planet.”

From one’s surroundings occupied by compelling visual effects to walking through a tunnel made of mountains of plastic, the international artists of Terra take visitors on an eye-opening and immersive journey to rekindle their love for the planet.

The artists created with recycled materials and used different methods such as virtual and augmented realities.

“Through different installations and artworks, each artist brought his or her unique skills and ideas and implemented them differently to tackle these environmental challenges,” Abushullaih said.

“Some of the challenges that are presented include extensive consumption of plastic bags, the effect of climate change on planktons, the damaged coral reefs caused by overfishing, and even the challenge of water scarcity.”

Daniel Popper, a multidisciplinary artist known globally for his sculptures and public art installations, has an entrance piece that is a metaphor for guests entering the heart of nature.

“He planted a huge monument by the gate with an installation made of upcycled material. He did this to create a gate to knowledge and form an invitation to connect and understand nature,” Abushullaih said.

Another display is from Basia Goszczynks, who creates art with recycled materials she finds at the beach, on the streets, and at trash facilities. Goszczynks was behind the installation of a cave made up of 80,000 used plastic bags.

The piece is meant to incite visitors to visually experience half of a second of the world’s consumption of plastic bags.

“The idea is to create a shocking moment that empowers the visitor to adopt a new behavior with regards to dealing with single-use plastics,” Abushullaih said.

Terra parades impactful optical illusions and immersive and interactive technologies provided by META, an international experience product company, which combines intelligence, craft, and artistry with immersive technologies.

“META’s contribution is the Oxygen Oasis installation which tells the story of how oxygen is created on earth through the use of 3D projection mapping,” Abushullaih said.

Terra was first exhibited in New York City at Arcadia Earth, a next-generation art exhibition and extended reality experience designed to reignite the conversation around the most pressing environmental issues. Terra has now found its way to Ithra in Dhahran through the center’s collaboration with Arcadia Earth.

It was created by Valentino Vettori, who is an experiential artist with more than 20 years of experience dedicated to reimagining the way people interact and engage with the environment. Arcadia Earth is also the first multi-channel platform to provide an opportunity for individuals to experience the troubles facing our planet through different mediums of art and technology.

“It is a platform that allows sustainability artists to express their concerns with the public and provides a space for open-mindedness with their unique storytelling approach,” Abushullaih said.

Ithra has chosen a more practical way to promote Terra by taking it outside of the center’s building and onto the streets “because this is specifically about environmental sustainability, so we extended it outwards. Through working with our volunteer programs, we acted in different ways to practice sustainability like cleaning the streets or beaches to create positive and tangible impacts.”

A different aspect of Terra that makes it unique to other exhibits of sustainability is its holistic approach.

“It presents challenges as well as solutions through subtle suggestions, and little bits of knowledge for the visitor to take and possibly incorporate them in their daily practices to help improve the environment and reduce the harm,” Abushullaih said.

The head of the Ithra Museum added that art is a great tool to raise awareness on various issues.

“Artists, throughout history, have always shown interest in the environment in their work,” Abushullaih said.

“In the last century, a specialized approach to art has emerged to shed light on these threats. Art is a great means to provide knowledge and it is a powerful tool to reach the public and make difficult and harsh information easy to digest.”

The exhibit is open to all age groups and will run until the end of September. It accommodates both Arabic and English speakers. For more information, visit the website https://www.ithra.com


Saudi artist paints elderly back into the social picture

In a latest collection, titled ‘See In My Eyes,’ the beauty of a group of elderly subjects. (Supplied)
In a latest collection, titled ‘See In My Eyes,’ the beauty of a group of elderly subjects. (Supplied)
Updated 01 December 2021

Saudi artist paints elderly back into the social picture

In a latest collection, titled ‘See In My Eyes,’ the beauty of a group of elderly subjects. (Supplied)
  • Fawaz Binkolaib says remaining integrated in society is vital to the well-being of older people

JEDDAH: Art presents us with an opportunity to fight social stigmas and promote inclusion through the positive representation and empowerment of marginalized groups.

In a world where younger generations are celebrated and adulated, the elderly can sometimes feel like they have lost their place and succumb to loneliness due to social exclusion and ageist stigma. But according to a local artist, one way in which older people can remain full and active members of society is through art.
Ageism is a global phenomenon that affects senior citizens across all cultures. In the Saudi context, culture plays a vital role in socially including the elderly, where family solidarity equates to ensuring the well-being of senior members.

FASTFACT

In a world where younger generations are celebrated and adulated, the elderly can sometimes feel like they have lost their place and succumb to loneliness due to social exclusion and ageist stigma. But according to a local artist, one way in which older people can remain full and active members of society is through art.

Fawaz Binkolaib, a Jeddah-based artist with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the Art Institute of Houston in Texas, said older members of society were all too often left on the sidelines.
“As we grow older, time leaves its marks on our skin, the stages of our lives telling stories of pain and laughter,” the 29-year-old told Arab News.
“We sometimes unintentionally exclude our seniors from daily social activities, treating them as unfit to take part.”
It was while studying in the US that Binkolaib realized how art could be used as a medium for conversation.
“My passion for art was sparked in a general education class I had to take in my first year called art appreciation,” he said. “My mind was woken by the subjective and various art forms and how that can provide different ways of communicating for us as a species.”
In his latest collection, titled “See In My Eyes,” Binkolaib showcases the beauty of a group of elderly subjects through the intricacies of every fold and wrinkle on their faces.
He said that creating the digital images, which he did using an electronic pen and pad, enabled him to really connect with his subjects.
“Speaking to the elderly was peaceful and easy,” he said. “They were excited to be voiced and heard. As we were speaking, other people passed by and joined the conversation, helping them to get across their stories.
“After talking with my senior muses, I became aware that a sense of community can enhance their overall psychological and emotional well-being,” he added.
“For that, I believe that promoting community-engaged art programs can empower and uplift senior citizens. I also think that their absence from social media has made it difficult for them to represent their image and how the younger generation perceives them.”
Binkolaib also said that facilitating and accommodating elderly people’s inclusion in community activities, like art, and familiarizing them with current trends was a good way to reintegrate them into society.
Art serves as a channel of untraditional communication for those unable to find the words to express their feelings, he added. Therefore, creating artistic outlets for senior citizens can help bridge the generation gap and energize their souls, providing solidarity and social cohesion.
Binkolaib says the elderly were us years before our time, leaving their thumbprint on all the places we are yet to experience for ourselves, carrying with them the wisdom of life gained through trials and tribulations.
“Because one day all we are going to have are the marks on our faces that relay our stories better than our words ever can,” he said.
Examples of the artist’s work can be found on his Instagram page, @Fawaz_designs.


Star-studded Indian film ‘83’ to have world premiere during Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah

Star-studded Indian film ‘83’ to have world premiere during Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah
The film will close out the festival’s inaugural edition on Dec. 15 ahead of its theatrical release on the 24th. Supplied
Updated 29 November 2021

Star-studded Indian film ‘83’ to have world premiere during Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah

Star-studded Indian film ‘83’ to have world premiere during Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah

DUBAI: “’83,” a film directed by Indian filmmaker Kabir Khan will have its world premiere at the upcoming Red Sea International Film Festival, set to take place from Dec. 16-15 in Jeddah.

The film will close out the festival’s inaugural edition on Dec. 15 ahead of its theatrical release on the 24th.

The premiere will be attended by cast and crew, including the director and Bollywood star Deepika Padukone, the captain of the 1983 World Cup-winning team, Kapil Dev, alongside Mohinder Amarnath, vice captain of the team and legendary cricketeer Kris Srikkanth.

“83” tells the true story of Indian athlete Kapil Dev (Singh) who led the country’s cricket team to its first-ever World Cup victory in 1983. Supplied

“I’m beyond excited to unveil “’83” at the Red Sea International Film Festival, the opening of cinemas in Saudi Arabia is a fantastic opportunity for filmmakers in India and across the world,” Khan said in a statement. “To go on this journey, and to bring the story to screen with legends, Ranveer Singh, Deepika Padukone and cricket icon Kapil Dev was like winning the world cup for me.”

Starring Ranveer Singh, “83” tells the true story of Indian athlete Kapil Dev (Singh) who led the country’s cricket team to its first-ever World Cup victory in 1983 at the Lord’s Cricket Ground in London against the West Indies.  

According to a release, actors trained for months with the real cricketeers they were portraying in order to understand the nuances of the bat-and-ball game that originated in east England.

Edouard Waintrop, Artistic Director of the film festival said: “‘83 is such a monumental film that will capture the public imagination, in Jeddah and across the world. A true celebration of one of the greatest underdog stories in international sporting history, it continues to inspire generations of young people, and the incredible Hindi-language film is sure to do the same. We are thrilled to host the cast and crew, as well sporting icon Kapil Dev at the Red Sea International Film Festival for one of the most anticipated films of the year.”

 


Past and future meet in UAE-based trio’s ‘Beyond: Emerging Artists’ display

Past and future meet in UAE-based trio’s ‘Beyond: Emerging Artists’ display
“Beyond: Emerging Artists,” a section of the now-wrapped up Abu Dhabi Art fair features work by Hashel Al-Lamki.. Courtesy of Abu Dhabi Art
Updated 28 November 2021

Past and future meet in UAE-based trio’s ‘Beyond: Emerging Artists’ display

Past and future meet in UAE-based trio’s ‘Beyond: Emerging Artists’ display

DUBAI: A woman dressed in black with a light blue colored sack over her head moves gracefully amidst a dark forest — she holds in either hand a branch with white feathers. The video work, executed in 2021 and titled “Too Close to the Sun,” is by Emirati artist Maitha Abdalla and it is on display in “Beyond: Emerging Artists,” which wraps up on Dec. 4 in Abu Dhabi’s Manarat Al-Saadiyat.

The exhibition kicked off as part of the wider Abu Dhabi Art fair that ended Nov. 21. Curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, “Beyond: Emerging Artists” explores the challenges of the future and painful reminders of the past while highlighting three UAE-based artists.

Alongside Abdalla's showcase are rooms featuring work by Emirati Hashel Al-Lamki and American Christopher Benton, who is based in Dubai.

A view of the room of Emirati artist Maitha Abdallah in Beyond: Emerging Artists, a section at this year's now concluded Abu Dhabi Art fair running until Dec. 4th. Courtesy of Abu Dhabi Art
 

Bardaouil and Fellrath told Arab News that the three artists’ strong links with Abu Dhabi allowed them to examine the city’s history and diversity, as well as its challenges and opportunities.

“Throughout our curatorial practice we have always been closely connected to the art scene in the Gulf region, and to the UAE in particular,” Bardaouil and Fellrath told Arab News. “Each of the three artists are either from Abu Dhabi or have been based here for a very long time. It was important to us that there is a strong connection to the city the works are exhibited in, to its history and diversity, as well as to its challenges and opportunities.”

The artists rely on media ranging from painting to sculpture, soundscapes, video works, found objects and site-specific installations.

The core focus of the program is on mentorship. Its aims thus venture outside the traditional role of a curator. “We wanted to work with artists where we felt we could contribute to the development of their practice,” said Bardaouil and Fellrath. “It was important to us to give each artist their own distinct voice and offer them the freedom and support to develop a project that they already had on their mind. Each of the three artists pushed their initial ideas to create truly immersive installations that are made up of different individual components.”

Abdalla’s commissions are part of a series of works that “negotiates the wild nature of women that social forces have often attempted to tame,” according to the artist.

In her room, Abdalla recreated US psychoanalyst Pinkola’s “wild creature” through her immersive installation. The visitor walks into an immersive space with a window that looks outdoors where there is a video of a performance where the performer, Abdalla, is attempting different poses of Pinkola’s “wild woman.”

“In my work, I am interested in storytelling and folk tales, and for this exhibition I was inspired by the book ‘Women Who Run with the Wolves,’ by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, an American psychoanalyst. She talks about how in every woman there is a wild creature and that this creature is powerful. She calls it wild woman and says this creature is an endangered species,” Abdalla said.

“Maitha’s work is amazing—from performances that revolve around notions of female wildness (characterized by a quasi-mythological woman, Sila) to sculptures and paintings that provoke thought and discussion around what’s considered right and wrong behavior and thought in communities,” Fair Director Dyala Nusseibeh told Arab News. “She reminds me in some ways of Paula Rego in the intensity of her paintings.”

Each room is conceived as an immersive space through which visitors can delve into each artist's work, practice and personal life. The walls and tiles of Abdalla’s room are painted pink, for example, to recall her childhood bathroom. As Nusseibeh says, “the ambitious claiming of each room” by the artists provides a unique portal into their world. 

 


 

Hashem Al-Lamki, Neptune. Courtsey of Abu Dhabi Art

 

Benton’s installation of a chained palm tree also fosters debate around labor economies and the appropriation of Middle Eastern culture in the US.

Christopher Joshua Benton, chained palm tree installation. Courtsey of Abu Dhabi Art

The artist’s film “The Kite Has Come” features archival images of Zanzibar from 1860-1910 — when the world’s last slave market operated in the city — and explores how slave histories in past centuries resonate in today’s world.

What profoundly resonates with the visitor even after they have left the room is how Benton’s work remembers the presence of the East African diaspora in the Gulf and the in-depth thought he has given to slave histories and how their stories over the last few centuries continue in today’s world.

Al-Lamki’s room on the other hand, entirely painted in a mystical soft blue, looks at the rapid pace of transformations shaping the UAE today, particularly evident in the building up of his hometown of Al-Ain.  

The artist, who founded the art group Bait 15 in a residential neighborhood in downtown Abu Dhabi, uses natural pigments collected from regional locations, referencing traditions that are under threat from new technologies and consumerism.

“The extravagance of the glitter and dyes in his paintings alongside the use of batteries, star stickers and popcorn in his sculpture, contribute to a sense of spectacle and futurism, but also a note of wistfulness for what is left behind,” Nusseibeh said.

What is so poignant about the works by each of the artists is that they go beyond of their formal, physical realm as art to tell the stories of their creators and the past and present histories of the world around them.

As an overall exhibition, the three rooms offer immersive solo shows covering each artist’s diverse practices within the context of their shared relationship to the UAE, its past and present histories and rapidly unfolding future.


Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day

Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day
Updated 29 November 2021

Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day

Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day

DUBAI: Italian brand Loro Piana has unveiled an artistic collaboration with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej in celebration of the UAE’s 50th National Day.

The partnership features 50 limited-edition Loro Piana cashmere plaids, each signed and numbered by the painter.

The brand hosted a gala dinner on Tuesday at Dubai’s Etihad Museum. (Supplied)

For the collaboration, Bin Lahej reimagined the UAE National Anthem using his own Arabic font, Mattar.

He also created a 3.5-meter-tall, stainless-steel sculpture, “Constitution,” that was unveiled during a gala dinner on Tuesday at Dubai’s Etihad Museum.

Bin Lahej created a 5.5-meter-tall, stainless-steel sculpture. (Supplied)

Speaking at the event, Loro Piana’s chief executive officer, Damien Bertrand, said: “The plaid is, for Loro Piana, very precious and unique. It perfectly embodies the memorable touch of Loro Piana, which is at the core of the brand. A unique touch which is a result of a unique craftsmanship.”

Bertrand also announced that the fashion label was partnering with the Emirates Red Crescent to supply winter clothing for Syrian refugees in the charity’s Jordan camp.

The event featured performances by Laura Marzadori, first violinist of the Teatro alla Scala, joined by the string section of the National Symphony Orchestra. (Supplied)

In her address to dinner guests, Emirates Red Crescent marketing director, Reef Al-Khajeh, said: “The UAE has been known as a generous and caring nation. This collaboration is a demonstration of how deep rooted the culture of giving is embedded.

“The Emirates Red Crescent is constantly acting and reacting to the urgent needs of people affected by misfortune all around the world, and our partnership with Loro Piana will complement the efforts we make to provide relief to those forced into shelters and facing extreme conditions due to disasters and emergencies,” she added. 

The event featured performances by Laura Marzadori, first violinist of the Teatro alla Scala, joined by the string section of the National Symphony Orchestra. The dinner was made by Italian Michelin-starred chef Niko Romito, who joined forces with Emirati pastry chef Sahar Parham Al-Awadhi to serve a culinary ode to Italy and the seven Emirates.


Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020

Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020
Updated 26 November 2021

Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020

Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020

DUBAI: US hitmaker Alicia Keys will be the first international artist to perform as part of Expo 2020 Dubai’s Infinite Nights series on Dec. 10, organizers announced on Friday.

The 15-time Grammy Award-winner will give fans a glimpse of her new double album, “Keys.”

“Performing in Expo 2020 Dubai’s Infinite Nights series is going to be such an incredible experience,” said Keys in a released statement. “I’m so excited to share such a beautifully unique and special performance on the eve of the release of my new album ‘Keys’ with the world.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alicia Keys (@aliciakeys)

“‘Keys’ is all about letting go of anything that holds you back and breaking through the invisible ceilings above us! It perfectly reflects Expo’s values. I cannot wait to unlock this new universe with you,” she said.

The show will be live-streamed for supporters around the world on www.virtualexpodubai.com, and available to watch across multiple channels, including Expo TV on YouTube and Facebook.

Lubna Haroun, vice president of Expo 2020’s headline talent guest group owner Moment-Makers, said in a statement: “After the incredible success of our Arab artists in October and November, we are excited to bring Alicia Keys to Expo 2020 to headline our Infinite Nights series.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alicia Keys (@aliciakeys)

“Expo 2020 and Alicia share the belief that people’s creativity and diversity should be celebrated, that everyone has the opportunity to fulfill their dreams and shine. We are looking forward to a show that inspires and delights our audiences,” she added.

Infinite Nights is a series of events taking place until March 31, welcoming visitors to celebrate human creativity, innovation, progress and culture.

Arab celebrities that performed so far include Iraqi singer Kadim Al-Saher and Lebanese stars Nancy Ajram and Ragheb Alama.