HIPA winners explore the human condition in photography competition

HIPA winners explore the human condition in photography competition
‘Final Destination’ by Sameer Al-Doumy (France). Supplied
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Updated 29 July 2021

HIPA winners explore the human condition in photography competition

HIPA winners explore the human condition in photography competition
  • Selected highlights from the prize’s tenth edition, held under the theme ‘Humanity’

DUBAI: The winners of the tenth season of the Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum International Photography Awards (HIPA) were announced this week. The theme of this year’s awards was ‘’Humanity.” American photographer, and co-founder and director of the VII Academy, Gary Knight — one of this year’s judges, said in a press release: “Humanity is the most important thing a lens can capture … photography is a unique tool that gives us the ability to talk about others and show the conditions they are in and the feelings they are going through. It is clear that this year's winners have interpreted humanity in powerful and diverse ways.”

HIPA Secretary General Ali bin Thalith said: “This season we were humbled by the awe-inspiring and emotionally charged photographs we received that not only dug deep, but also unearthed, through photography, the essence of what it means to be human. In these photographs we felt a myriad of emotions ranging from absolute despair to pure kindness and joy.”

Aside from vying for the $120,000 Grand Prize, photographers could also enter the ‘General’ category (open to both black-and-white and color images); the ‘Portfolio’ category and the ‘Architectural Photography’ category. Here, we present a selection of highlights from the winning entries.

Grand prize winner

‘Duty’

Ary Bassous (Brazil)




‘Duty’ by Ary Bassous (Brazil). Supplied

Bassous picked up the main award for this striking, harrowing portrait of Dr. Juliana Ribeiro having just removed her personal protective equipment in order to have her lunch after an eight-hour shift in the COVID-19 emergency room at the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Velho in Rio de Janeiro. Bassous’ image seems to sum up the emotions of the past 18 months while also paying tribute to the extraordinary efforts of frontline healthcare workers around the world.

“Clear signs of prolonged and repeated use of this type of equipment appear on her face. Her features reflect great effort and extreme fatigue due to the human commitment to her moral duty. What grabs you is the hint of sadness in her face as she feels the pain for humanity, as deaths in Brazil exceeded half a million people due to the pandemic,” the caption for the image reads. In its press release, HIPA commented: “The marks on her face share the painful human stories that (have) consumed the entire world.”

Third prize winner: Humanity

‘Blast Scars’

Marc Abou Jaoude (Lebanon)




‘Blast Scars’ by Marc Abou Jaoude (Lebanon). Supplied

Abou Jaoude’s image was taken on August 6, 2020 — two days after the devastating explosion in the Port of Beirut that left at least 220 dead, 6,500 injured and 300,000 displaced from their homes. Here, an injured truck driver stands in same location he was in when the explosion happened. “Despite the massive destruction and the large number of dead and wounded, this driver was lucky enough to live and witness another day,” the caption says.

First prize winner: General (color)

‘Final Destination’

Sameer Al-Doumy (France)




‘Final Destination’ by Sameer Al-Doumy (France). Supplied

The Syrian photographer picked up first place in the ‘General (color)’ category for his beautifully timed shot of migrants caught in the “turbulent waters between Sangat and Cap Blanc-Nez (Cape Blanc-Nez), in the English Channel off the coast of northern France, as they try to cross the maritime border between France and the United Kingdom on August 27, 2020.”

Second prize winner: Architecture

‘Playful Moon’

Amri Arfianto (Indonesia)




‘Playful Moon’ by Amri Arfianto (Indonesia). Supplied

Dubai’s skyline proved a source of creative inspiration in the ‘Architectural Photography’ category, with Indian photographer Rahul Bansal winning fifth prize for an image of the ‘Eye of Dubai.’ Arfianto chose an even more iconic site for his winning image, which shows, HIPA says: “A creative fragmentation of the Burj Khalifa, in which the moon appears as if it is trying to hide behind the most famous tower in the world.”

Fourth prize winner: Portfolio

‘Pareidolia’

Yousef Al-Habshi Al-Hashmi (UAE)




‘Pareidolia’ by Yousef Al-Habshi Al-Hashmi (UAE). Supplied

Al-Hashmi was awarded for his collection of shots of microscopic organisms. “Pareidolia is the tendency for incorrect perception of a stimulus as an object, pattern or meaning known to the observer, such as seeing shapes in clouds, faces in inanimate objects or abstract patterns,” HIPA’s caption reads. “(This) collection attempts to find faces with unique characteristics under the microscope and within a tiny area that barely can be seen.”

Second prize winner: General (color)

‘Camille’

Fatima Zahra Cherkaoui (Morocco)




‘Camille’ by Fatima Zahra Cherkaoui (Morocco). Supplied

Cherkaoui’s use of black backgrounds on her portraits make them look like an old-master’s painting, as she herself noted on her Instagram post of this picture of an 11-year-old girl. “Looks like she's out of an old painting, she's just beautiful,” Cherkaoui wrote. HIPA’s caption for her winning entry praised the range of emotions the photographer had captured in her subject’s eyes.

First prize winner: Humanity

‘Hugs to Survive’

Mads Nissen (Denmark)




‘Hugs to Survive’ by Mads Nissen (Denmark). Supplied

As you might expect, the COVID-19 pandemic was a dominant theme in this year’s HIPA entries. In Nissen’s winning image, 85-year-old Rosa Luzia Lonardi is hugged by nurse Adriana Silva da Costa Souza. “In March 2020, nursing homes across Brazil closed their doors to all visitors, preventing millions from visiting elderly relatives, as authorities instructed to reduce physical contact to a minimum. But in Viva Beam, a simple innovation called the 'hug curtain' was allowed, (through which) people could see and hug their loved ones without risking their lives,” the caption explains. This was “the first hug Rosa had received in five months.”


Emirati artist Aisha Juma takes part in ‘Beyond Belief’ exhibition in Germany 

Emirati artist Aisha Juma takes part in ‘Beyond Belief’ exhibition in Germany 
Updated 21 September 2021

Emirati artist Aisha Juma takes part in ‘Beyond Belief’ exhibition in Germany 

Emirati artist Aisha Juma takes part in ‘Beyond Belief’ exhibition in Germany 

DUBAI: Emirati visual artist Aisha Juma is showcasing her work at an exhibition titled “Beyond Belief” in Berlin, Germany. 

Supported by Abu Dhabi Festival (ADF), Juma is taking part in the exhibition that brings together a variety of artworks from more than 35 artists. 

Aisha Juma is an Emirati visual artist. (aishajuma.com)

Open until Nov. 21, “Beyond Belief” explores the rise of modern-day spirituality, its origins, diverse manifestations and unique contemporary attributes. 

Juma, on her Instagram account, shared images of her drawings that are “inspired by the concept of art and spirituality.

“So happy to be part of this fundamental creative conversation,” she wrote. 

The inauguration of the event was attended by Hafsa Al-Ulama, the UAE ambassador to Germany. 

In her speech at the event, Al-Ulama praised the strong cultural ties between the UAE and Germany, and commended ADF’s commitment to participating in art exhibitions and festivals in Germany. 

She added that the festival’s sponsorship of “Beyond Belief” reflects Abu Dhabi’s role in promoting art worldwide. 


Bahraini label Noon by Noor lights up London Fashion Week

Designers Shaikha Noor Al-Khalifa and Shaikha Haya Al-Khalifa presented a collection titled ‘Light.’ (Supplied)
Designers Shaikha Noor Al-Khalifa and Shaikha Haya Al-Khalifa presented a collection titled ‘Light.’ (Supplied)
Updated 21 September 2021

Bahraini label Noon by Noor lights up London Fashion Week

Designers Shaikha Noor Al-Khalifa and Shaikha Haya Al-Khalifa presented a collection titled ‘Light.’ (Supplied)

DUBAI: Bahraini label Noon by Noor showed off its Spring 2022 collection at London Fashion Week this weekend, debuting a line of lighter-than-air separates and dainty dresses.

Designers Shaikha Noor Al-Khalifa and Shaikha Haya Al-Khalifa presented a collection titled “Light” at East London’s Rochelle School, which specializes in art and architecture.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Noon By Noor (@noonbynoor)

The label, which is a regular on the New York Fashion Week circuit, drew crowds to its London showcase, with a host of industry insiders and influencers taking to social media to show off the new collection.

The brand, which was established in 2008, showed off a floral-tinged offering. (Supplied)

The brand, which was established in 2008, showed off a floral-tinged offering, with sprigs of color, as well as white-on-white looks complete with traditional mirror work embroidery.

“We selected our fabrics, mixing different scales of checks from ginghams to madras, alongside bold stripes in lime-ivory, pink-ivory and grey-ivory,” designer Shaikha Noor Al-Khalifa said in a released statement.

“A photograph of Bahraini pearl divers in their sarongs gently gathered and tied at the waist, mixed with dreams of summer sunshine, holiday memories and flowers was the start of our spring collection development,” she added.

Her cousin and co-designer Shaikha Haya Al-Khalifa shed further light on the materials chosen for the collection.

“Beautiful poplins, jersey, washed cottons, coated linens, silk voiles, organza, tulle and canvas all reflect the idea of light. Sometimes two or three of these fabrics are combined into one garment,” she said.


Expo 2020 Dubai releases official song featuring regional stars

Expo 2020 Dubai releases official song featuring regional stars
Updated 21 September 2021

Expo 2020 Dubai releases official song featuring regional stars

Expo 2020 Dubai releases official song featuring regional stars

DUBAI: Expo 2020 Dubai, which will kick off on Oct. 1, released its official song titled “This is our Time” on Tuesday. 

The English and Arabic language song, now available on YouTube, features Emirati singer Hussain Al-Jassmi, who is Expo 2020’s ambassador, along with US-Lebanese Grammy-nominated singer and songwriter Mayssa Karaa, who is the artistic director of Expo’s all-female Firdaus Orchestra. 

“This is our Time” also features 21-year-old Emirati singer-songwriter Almas, named in Spotify’s list of best female talent in the Middle East.

“‘This is our Time’ is a tribute to the UAE for all it has been, is today and will achieve in the years to come,” Al-Jassmi said in a released statement. “It’s a song about pride, faith and unity, and I hope that it brings a smile to the faces of everyone who hears it, wherever they may be in the world. Being a part of such an iconic event in the UAE’s history is extremely exciting and rewarding.”

Meanwhile, Karaa said that she feels honored to have collaborated on the song. “Expo 2020 is a significant moment for the entire Arab world and for Arabs around the rest of the world. Through this song, I hope we can inspire people of all ages and from all walks of life to follow their dreams – the possibilities are endless,” she said. 

The youngest of the trio, Almas, said that the song is an “embodiment of hope and the belief that collaboration will yield a better future for all.”

“I’m so proud to be Emirati and play a role in a moment that will be forever part of my country’s history,” she added. 

The six-month event, which was postponed due to COVID-19, will run until March 31, 2022. 


Bella Hadid celebrates niece Khai’s birthday with never-before-seen snaps

US-Palestinian-Dutch model Bella Hadid took to Instagram on Sunday to celebrate her niece’s first birthday. (File/ Getty Images)
US-Palestinian-Dutch model Bella Hadid took to Instagram on Sunday to celebrate her niece’s first birthday. (File/ Getty Images)
Updated 20 September 2021

Bella Hadid celebrates niece Khai’s birthday with never-before-seen snaps

US-Palestinian-Dutch model Bella Hadid took to Instagram on Sunday to celebrate her niece’s first birthday. (File/ Getty Images)

DUBAI: US-Palestinian-Dutch model Bella Hadid took to Instagram on Sunday to celebrate her niece’s first birthday, and paid special tribute to Gigi Hadid and her partner Zayn Malik on their daughter’s big day.

“Happy Birthday to the greatest gift our family has ever been blessed with… I didn’t know my heart could grow this big!!!” Bella posted on Instagram, alongside a carousel of photos featuring the now-one-year-old.

Although baby Khai’s face was blocked by emoji stickers in all the shots, for privacy reasons, Bella managed to gush over the family’s bundle of joy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Bella (@bellahadid)

“You make me smile when I’m sad and make me cry of happiness just because (you’re) alive. I can’t wait to watch you grow into the most perfect specimen of all. @gigihadid @zayn thank you for my forever best friend,” the model aunt added.

The couple announced the birth of their daughter in September 2020, with Gigi sharing the exciting news with her 58.5 million Instagram followers.

“Our girl joined us Earth-side this weekend and she’s already changed our world,” she said at the time.

For his part, proud father and British signer Malik write: “Our baby girl is here, healthy and beautiful. To try put into words how I am feeling right now would be an impossible task.”

“The love I feel for this tiny human is beyond my understanding. Grateful to know her, proud to call her mine, and thankful for the life we will have together,” he added.


Review: ‘Schumacher’ is a touching, if unsatisfying, portrait of a legend

Review: ‘Schumacher’ is a touching, if unsatisfying, portrait of a legend
Updated 20 September 2021

Review: ‘Schumacher’ is a touching, if unsatisfying, portrait of a legend

Review: ‘Schumacher’ is a touching, if unsatisfying, portrait of a legend

LONDON: Michael Schumacher will always be an iconic figure in Formula 1 — widely regarded as one of the most gifted racers of all time, with a work ethic hitherto unseen in the sport, and a drive for perfection that left his rivals staggered by his laser focus. And while this documentary, created with the blessing and cooperation of the Schumacher family, offers an incredible look at the personal and private life of the German driver, it does little to expand on what most people already know about the seven-times world champion.

Now streaming on Netflix, a procession of famous faces from the world of F1 — Ross Brawn, Flavio Briatore, Jean Todt, Eddie Irvine, David Coulthard and many others — offer their recollections of Michael, and those interviews are expertly combined with archival material from Schumacher himself, home videos released by the family, and interviews with his wife and children.

Michael Schumacher’s documentary offers a look at the personal and private life of the German driver. (Motorsport Images)

But while directors Hanns-Bruno Kammertöns, Vanessa Nöcker and Michael Wech do a skilled job of stitching everything together, they rarely take the chance to take “Schumacher” into new territory. Subjects such as Schumacher’s aggression-fueled lapses in racing judgement, or his insistence that he simply couldn’t be in the wrong in any crash, get little more than lip service — perhaps understandably, given that the film was created in such close cooperation with his family. But it does beg the question of what “Schumacher” hopes to achieve. Anyone who follows F1 knows that his was a generation-defining talent, and hearing that same sentiment reflected by a series of notable interviewees simply rings a little hollow.

What’s more, the movie steers clear of offering up any glimpse of Schumacher today. At the end of 2013, Michael suffered a significant brain injury during a skiing trip and hasn’t been seen since. He is, his family insists, continuing to live his life as privately as possible. And while that privacy is important, and absolutely his right, it makes for a strange juxtaposition with a film billed as offering such an intimate portrait of a racing legend.