Arab-Israeli influencer Nuseir Yassin gets backlash for attempt to monetize protected Philippine cultural tradition

Arab-Israeli influencer Nuseir Yassin gets backlash for attempt to monetize protected Philippine cultural tradition
The 105-year-old Whang-Od, the Philippines’ last and oldest mambabatok or traditional tattooist of her tribe. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 06 August 2021

Arab-Israeli influencer Nuseir Yassin gets backlash for attempt to monetize protected Philippine cultural tradition

Arab-Israeli influencer Nuseir Yassin gets backlash for attempt to monetize protected Philippine cultural tradition
  • Nas Academy offers the Philippine traditional tattooing course for $15

DUBAI: Arab-Israeli social media influencer Nuseir Yassin, who runs the Nas Daily vlog, has received backlash for his attempt to monetize a protected cultural tradition in the northern Philippines.

Nas Daily, which gained traction on Facebook and YouTube for featuring light and positively-vibed one-minute videos, has earlier launched an online class under its Nas Academy brand on the ancient art of tattooing.

The course features Whang-Od, the Philippines’ last and oldest mambabatok or traditional tattooist of her tribe.

The 105-year-old Whang-Od is part of the Butbut people of the larger Kalinga ethnic group, who were once known as fierce headhunters whose warriors received markings on their bodies to celebrate their victories against their enemies.

Nas Academy offered the traditional tattooing course for $15. It includes three videos, ranging from four and a half minutes to over 18 minutes long.

The course was then removed after Apo Whang-od’s grandniece Grace Palicas slammed the vlogging site as a “scam”.

“WARNING!!! Whang Od Academy is a scam. My grandmother did not sign any contract with @NasDaily to do any academy. Some people are taking advantage of our culture. PLEASE HELP US STOP this disrespect to the legacy of Apo Whang Od and the Butbot Tribe,” Palicas posted in the Facebook group Tattooed by Apo Whang-Od.

Well-known social media personality and lawyer Trixie Cruz-Angeles, who also specializes in heritages issues and concerns, said in a Facebook post that “Nas Daily and Nas Academy attempted to make money from the cultural manifestations of the Kalinga indigenous cultural community by featuring the manner and works of Apo Whang Od.”

“This violates the Indigenous People’s Rights Act, in particular Sec. 16 Rule VI of the IRR pursuant to Sec. 29 of the law,” she wrote, which pertains to state protection of indigenous culture, traditions and institutions.

Nas Academy on Thursday maintained that the Whang-Od consented to the online course, as she herself affixed her thumbprint in the contract, “signifying her full consent” to the Whang-Od Academy.

“This is the clearest evidence that it is not a scam and achieved the consent of her and her immediate family,” Nas Academy’s statement said.


Russia not planning to block YouTube, says digital development minister

Russia not planning to block YouTube, says digital development minister
Updated 8 sec ago

Russia not planning to block YouTube, says digital development minister

Russia not planning to block YouTube, says digital development minister
  • Russia has blocked other foreign social media platforms
  • Moscow restricted access to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram in early March
Russia is not planning to block Alphabet Inc’s YouTube, the minister for digital development said on Tuesday, acknowledging that such a move would likely see Russian users suffer and should therefore be avoided.
Russia has blocked other foreign social media platforms, but despite months of fines and threats against YouTube for failing to delete content Moscow deems illegal and for restricting access to some Russian media, it has stopped short of delivering a killer blow to the video-hosting service.
With around 90 million monthly users in Russia, YouTube is extremely popular and plays an important role in the digital economy. Though Russia has domestic versions of other social media, a viable YouTube alternative on that scale is yet to emerge.
“We are not planning to close YouTube,” Maksut Shadaev, who is also minister of communications and mass media, told an educational forum. “Above all, when we restrict something, we should clearly understand that our users won’t suffer.”
Competition is the engine of progress and blocking is an extreme measure, he told a vast auditorium of mostly young Russians, some scattered around the room on bean bags.
Alphabet’s Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Simmering tensions between Moscow and Big Tech erupted into a full-on information battle after Russia sent tens of thousands of troops into Ukraine on Feb. 24.
Russia restricted access to Twitter and Meta Platform’s Facebook and Instagram in early March. It vowed in April to punish Google for shutting out Russian state-funded media globally on YouTube, accusing it of spreading fakes about what Russia calls its special military operation in Ukraine.

Elon Musk says Twitter purchase will not go ahead without clarity on spam accounts

Elon Musk says Twitter purchase will not go ahead without clarity on spam accounts
Updated 17 May 2022

Elon Musk says Twitter purchase will not go ahead without clarity on spam accounts

Elon Musk says Twitter purchase will not go ahead without clarity on spam accounts
  • ‘Yesterday, Twitter’s CEO publicly refused to show proof of <5 percent. This deal cannot move forward until he does’

NEW YORK: Billionaire Elon Musk said Tuesday that his purchase of Twitter would not go ahead unless he was assured that fewer than five percent of accounts on the platform were fake.
“Yesterday, Twitter’s CEO publicly refused to show proof of <5 percent,” tweeted Musk, who has almost 94 million followers on the social network.
“This deal cannot move forward until he does.”


Twitter defends anti-bot efforts, Musk replies with poo emoji

Elon Musk's Twitter profile is seen on a smartphone. (REUTERS)
Elon Musk's Twitter profile is seen on a smartphone. (REUTERS)
Updated 17 May 2022

Twitter defends anti-bot efforts, Musk replies with poo emoji

Elon Musk's Twitter profile is seen on a smartphone. (REUTERS)
  • “The bot issue at the end of the day was known by the New York City cab driver and feels more to us like the ‘dog ate the homework’ excuse to bail on the Twitter deal or talk down a lower price”

SAN FRANCISCO: Twitter’s chief on Monday defended the messaging platform’s battle against “bots” that aspiring buyer Elon Musk says vex the platform, only to have the billionaire respond with a poo emoji.
The exchange played out in tweets as Musk’s $44 billion buy of Twitter remained “temporarily on hold,” pending questions over the social media company’s estimates of the number of fake accounts, or “bots.”
“It appears the spam/bot issue is cascading and clearly making the Twitter deal a confusing one,” Wedbush analyst Dan Ives said in a note to investors.
“The bot issue at the end of the day was known by the New York City cab driver and feels more to us like the ‘dog ate the homework’ excuse to bail on the Twitter deal or talk down a lower price.”
Twitter chief executive Parag Agrawal said the platform suspends more than a half-million seemingly bogus accounts daily, usually before they are even seen, and locks millions more weekly that fail checks to make sure they are controlled by humans and not by software.
Internal measures show that fewer than five percent of accounts active on any given day at Twitter are spam, but that analysis can’t be replicated externally due to the need to keep user data private, Agrawal contended.
Musk, who has said bots plague Twitter and that he would make getting rid of them a priority if he owned the platform, responded to that tweet by Agrawal with a poo emoji.
“So how do advertisers know what they’re getting for their money?” Musk tweeted in a subsequent response about the need to prove Twitter users are real people.
“This is fundamental to the financial health of Twitter.”
The process used to estimate how many accounts are bots has been shared with Musk, Agrawal said.
The chief of SpaceX as well as Tesla, Musk is currently listed by Forbes as the world’s wealthiest person, with a fortune of some $230 billion, much of it in Tesla stock.
Seen by his champions as an iconoclastic genius and by his critics as an erratic megalomaniac, Musk surprised many investors in April with his pursuit of Twitter.
Musk has described his motivation as stemming from a desire to ensure freedom of speech on the platform and to boost monetization of an Internet site that is influential in media and political circles but has struggled to attain profitable growth.
Musk said he favored lifting the ban on Donald Trump, who was kicked off the platform in January 2021 shortly after the former US president’s efforts to overturn his election defeat led to the January 6 assault on the US Capitol.


Georgia jails prominent critical journalist

Georgia jails prominent critical journalist
Updated 16 May 2022

Georgia jails prominent critical journalist

Georgia jails prominent critical journalist
  • Lawyer: Political repressions are under way in Georgia
  • Rights groups have also concern over media freedom in Georgia

TBILISI: Georgia on Monday jailed for three and a half years a prominent journalist and owner of the country’s most popular television station critical of the Black Sea nation’s government.
Nika Gvaramia, an anchor and owner of the pro-opposition Mtavari TV, was found guilty of harming financial interests of a television station he had earlier run, a judge of the Tbilisi city court said.
Gvaramia has also been a lawyer of Georgia’s ex-president Mikheil Saakashvili who is serving a six-year jail term for abuse of power — a conviction he has denounced as politically-motivated.
Gvaramia has said his case was aimed at silencing critical media.
His lawyer Dito Sadzaglishvili said that the verdict was illegal, adding that “Gvaramia was taken into political captivity.”
“Political repressions are under way in Georgia,” he said.
“In democratic countries, journalists are not jailed for their dissenting views.”
Georgia’s prominent TV personalities and managers have long accused the ruling Georgian Dream party’s government of using the judiciary to stifle independent voices.
Rights groups have also expressed concern over media freedom in Georgia, saying managers and owners of nearly all independent TV stations critical of the Georgian government are under investigation.
Georgia’s rights ombudsperson, Nino Lomjaria, and Transparency International said Sunday they had studied Gvaramia’s case and found no proof of wrongdoing.
In October 2015, Gvaramia said a government middleman had threatened to release secretly-recorded videos showing what he described as his “private life” in an attempt to force him to quit journalism.
In 2007-2009, Gvaramia held several government posts in Saakashvili’s cabinet, overseeing his anti-corruption crusade.
Independent media in Georgia has often had fraught relations with authorities since the country gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.


Facebook: from Harvard dorm to global phenomenon

Facebook: from Harvard dorm to global phenomenon
Updated 16 May 2022

Facebook: from Harvard dorm to global phenomenon

Facebook: from Harvard dorm to global phenomenon
  • Young users increasingly desert it for the likes of TikTok or Snapchat, but with 1.96 billion users, one-quarter of the globe’s population, it remains the biggest social media platform

WASHINGTON: Key chapters in the history of Facebook, the world’s biggest social media application, which marks the tenth anniversary Wednesday of its stock market debut.

In 2003, 19-year-old Harvard computer whiz Mark Zuckerberg begins working out of his dormitory room on an online network aimed initially at connecting Harvard students.
The following year he launched thefacebook.com with three Harvard roommates and classmates: Chris Hughes, Eduardo Saverin and Dustin Moskovitz.
As membership is opened up to other colleges around North America Zuckerberg quits his studies and moves to Silicon Valley.
The new company receives its first investment from PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, who stumps up $500,000, and officially changes its name to Facebook in 2005.

In 2006, US media conglomerate Viacom and Yahoo make separate plays for Facebook, but both are turned down.
Microsoft takes a $240 million stake in the company a year later, by which time Facebook has 50 million users.
That year sees Zuckerberg admitting to privacy-related “mistakes” for the first time, over an ad platform called Beacon that tracked purchases made by Facebook members and let their friends know what they had bought.
In 2008, the platform topples MySpace to become the world’s most popular social networking website and launches its first mobile app the following year.

David Fincher’s story of the origins of Facebook, “The Social Network,” hits movie theaters in 2010 and wins Oscars for best adapted screenplay, original score and film editing.
Time magazine that year names Zuckerberg as Person of the Year for “transforming the way we live our lives every day.”
As membership rockets, Facebook plays a growing role in shaping public debate.
In 2011, the platform plays a key role in giving a voice to disillusioned Arab youth in the Arab Spring of revolts that began that year in Tunisia.

In 2012, Facebook snaps up photograph-sharing app Instagram for $1 billion and files for an initial public offering.
The biggest IPO ever in the tech sector raises some $16 billion and values the company at $104 billion.
A hoodie-clad Zuckerberg remotely rings the Nasdaq bell from Facebook’s California headquarters on the first day of trading.
By October 2012, Facebook’s membership has topped one billion.

In 2014, Facebook pays a small fortune to try boost its popularity among younger smartphone users by buying messaging platform WhatsApp in a cash and stock deal valued at $19 billion.
As it continues moving up in the world, it moves into new Frank Gehry-designed headquarters in Silicon Valley, with a rooftop park and “the largest open floor plan in the world.”

In 2016, Facebook is embroiled in controversy over Russia’s alleged use of it and other social media platforms to try influence the outcome of the election that brought Donald Trump to the White House.
In 2018, Facebook is again at the center of scandal after it emerges that British consulting firm Cambridge Analytica stealthily harvested the personal data of millions of Facebook users and used it for political purposes, including trying to rally support for Trump.
Zuckerberg is grilled in the US Congress over Facebook’s handling of user data and the way the network is being manipulated to undermine democracy.
The Facebook boss vows to do more to combat fake news, foreign interference in elections and hate speech and to tighten data privacy.

In 2021, Zuckerberg announces that Facebook has changed its company name to Meta — Greek for “beyond” but also meaning the metaverse — the virtual world which he sees as representing the future of the Internet.
On February 3, 2022, the company’s share price plunges, wiping more than $200 billion off its market value after it warns of slowing revenue growth.
As young users increasingly desert it for the likes of TikTok or Snapchat, the company admits to losing a million active daily users. But with 1.96 billion users, one-quarter of the globe’s population it remains the biggest social media platform.