Saudi Arabia condemns attack on Kabul airport

Saudi Arabia condemns attack on Kabul airport
Short Url
Updated 26 August 2021

Saudi Arabia condemns attack on Kabul airport

Saudi Arabia condemns attack on Kabul airport

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia strongly condemned and denunced the terrorist attack that targeted Hamid Karzai International Airport in the Afghan capital, Kabul, which led to a number of deaths and injuries.
Developing...
 


King Abdulaziz Royal Reserve gets 100,000 new trees

King Abdulaziz Royal Reserve gets 100,000 new trees
Updated 10 min 11 sec ago

King Abdulaziz Royal Reserve gets 100,000 new trees

King Abdulaziz Royal Reserve gets 100,000 new trees
  • Afforestation project at Rawdat Tinhat oasis is part of a goal to plant 5 million seedlings by 2025
  • Reserve was established in 2018 to preserve vulnerable and endangered plant and animal species

RIYADH: A major afforestation project is underway in Rawdat Tinhat, with 100,000 trees planted in the first phase alone.

The scheme is being handled by the Cooperative Society of Moringa and Desert Plants after being approved by the National Center for Vegetation Development and Combating Desertification and the King Abdulaziz Royal Reserve.

The reserve’s CEO Maher Al-Gothmi told Arab News that the aim was to plant 5 million trees by 2025.

Rawdat Tinhat is one of the largest green oases in the Arabian Peninsula into which several valleys flow. Located about 180 km north of Riyadh, within the royal reserve, it is home to many tree and plant species, including acacias and daisies.

The afforestation project is one of several agreed by the center with environmental associations to plant trees and shrubs in parks, valleys and other areas in the Riyadh, Qassim and Hail regions.

The projects reflect the center’s efforts to support nonprofit organizations and community partnerships, and align with its aim to increase green areas and reduce desertification, leading to sustainable development and improving quality of life as part of the Saudi Green Initiative.

The reserve is working with the Special Forces for Environmental Security and other groups to plant 500,000 seedlings in seven stages that will be irrigated using the water harvesting method. The 100,000 seedlings planted in the first phase included ghaf, talh, al-rimth and al-arfaj.

The royal reserve was established in 2018 to preserve vulnerable and endangered plant and animal species, and provide access to the environment and natural resources. It encompasses Al-Tanhat, Al-Khafs and Noura parks, as well as parts of the Al-Summan plateau and the Al-Dahna desert, and covers about 28,000 sq. km.

Al-Gothmi said the reserve was working to increase vegetation cover and reduce desertification through various initiatives, including the use of drones to disperse 300,000 seeds of the wild sidr plant as part of the “Let’s make it green” campaign.

Ibrahim Arif, an environmental expert and former professor of forest sciences at King Saud University, said that one of the most important factors in the afforestation process was maintenance.

As well as having a specialist team to undertake the planting work it was vital to implement a maintenance program to ensure the success of the afforestation process, he said.

A successful afforestation project was an investment that could provide not only a food source for wild animals, but also opportunities for beekeeping and other activities of economic value, he added.

Arif emphasized the importance of planting seedlings, rather than more developed trees, as they had more time to adapt to their new environment and could cope better with temperature changes.


Greece allows music in bars and restaurants again as COVID cases ease

Greece allows music in bars and restaurants again as COVID cases ease
Updated 10 min 49 sec ago

Greece allows music in bars and restaurants again as COVID cases ease

Greece allows music in bars and restaurants again as COVID cases ease
  • The country last month forced bars, nightclubs and restaurants to close at midnight
  • Capacity restrictions will remain in place for sport events, while a double mask is mandatory in supermarkets and transport

ATHENS: Greece will allow music in restaurants and bars again and extend their operating hours as it lifts some of the restrictions imposed last month now that coronavirus infections and the pressure on hospitals are easing, authorities said on Thursday.
The country last month forced bars, nightclubs and restaurants to close at midnight, with no standing customers and no music, following a surge of cases over the Christmas holidays due to the fast-spreading omicron variant.
“We have decided to scale back the restrictions, taking into consideration the course of the pandemic in terms of cases which have been declining in recent weeks,” Health Minister Thanos Plevris said in a televised statement.
He said that despite ongoing pressure on the health system, the rate of hospital admissions and discharges and a shorter duration and less severe illness for the omicron variant compared to Delta allowed authorities to ease the curbs.
Capacity restrictions will remain in place for sport events, while a double mask is mandatory in supermarkets and transport.
Greece reported 19,712 new cases on Thursday. Infections have been easing since a record high of around 50,000 in early January.
A total of 23,083 deaths linked to COVID-19 have been reported since February 2020 and 1,867,935 cases out of a population of 11 million people.


Japan take step closer to World Cup, S.Korea on cusp

Japan take step closer to World Cup, S.Korea on cusp
Updated 31 min 44 sec ago

Japan take step closer to World Cup, S.Korea on cusp

Japan take step closer to World Cup, S.Korea on cusp
  • Yuya Osako buried a first-half penalty to put four-time Asian champions Japan in control in Saitama
  • Group A is more clear cut, South Korea's 1-0 win at Lebanon meaning they are all but there

SAITAMA, Japan: Japan took a step closer to the World Cup with a 2-0 qualifying win over a toothless China while South Korea were on the brink of sealing their spot in Qatar on Thursday.
Yuya Osako buried a first-half penalty to put four-time Asian champions Japan in control in Saitama, north of Tokyo, before Junya Ito doubled their lead after the break.
Japan’s fourth win in a row kept them second in Group B behind leaders Saudi Arabia, who they host at the same stadium next Tuesday.
With Australia just a point behind Japan, three teams are battling it out for the two automatic spots from Group B as the qualifying campaign approaches its conclusion.
Group A is more clear cut, South Korea’s 1-0 win at Lebanon meaning they are all but there. If the United Arab Emirates drop points later Thursday, the Koreans — who were missing injured Spurs star Son Heung-min — will qualify. Iran are also on the cusp.
Japan manager Hajjime Moriyasu knows that next week’s clash with the Saudis could be pivotal to their chances.
“Looking ahead to the Saudi game, tonight’s match has helped strengthen our understanding as a team and that’s a big plus for us,” he said.
“But the Saudi game will have a different intensity and tension from tonight, and we have to be ready to play at a high level.”
Australia stayed in the hunt for an automatic berth with a comfortable 4-0 home win over Vietnam.
Jamie McLaren opened the scoring in the 30th minute in Melbourne before Tom Rogic notched a second in first-half injury time.
Craig Goodwin and Riley McGree added two more after the break to wrap up the win for the home side, whose manager Graham Arnold was absent after testing positive for Covid-19.
Japan were missing half their regular defense against China, with captain Maya Yoshida and Arsenal full-back Takehiro Tomiyasu both missing through injury.
But the home side took a 13th-minute lead after China defender Wang Shenchao slid in to block Ito’s cross but hit the ball with his arm.
Osako made no mistake from the spot and the hosts pressed home their advantage in the 61st minute when Ito rose to head home substitute Yuta Nakayama’s cross.
“We had a mix of overseas and domestic-based players so they were all at different levels of fitness,” said Moriyasu.
“Despite that they combined well and communicated well, and did a good job.”
China, who were playing their first game under new manager Li Xiaopeng, saw their slim hopes of reaching the World Cup all but ended.
“The players gave their all but the first goal came at a bad time for us and it threw us out of our rhythm,” said Li, whose side failed to have a shot on target.
“It had a really big impact.”


Rights experts, jurists, politicians urge UN to probe 1988 Iran massacre

Rights experts, jurists, politicians urge UN to probe 1988 Iran massacre
Updated 47 min 5 sec ago

Rights experts, jurists, politicians urge UN to probe 1988 Iran massacre

Rights experts, jurists, politicians urge UN to probe 1988 Iran massacre
  • Letter: ‘Mass executions, enforced disappearances of thousands of political prisoners constitute ongoing crimes against humanity’
  • Many were sent to their death by current President Ebrahim Raisi

LONDON: Hundreds of international lawyers and human rights scholars have penned an open letter to the UN’s Human Rights Council urging it to open an investigation into Iran’s 1988 massacre of political prisoners.

Dozens of rights groups also joined more than 450 individuals, many of them former world leaders and prosecutors in the International Criminal Court, in signing the letter, which was released to the public on Thursday.

“We urge the UN Human Rights Council to urgently challenge the impunity enjoyed by Iranian officials by mandating an international investigation into the 1988 mass executions and enforced disappearances of thousands of political prisoners which constitute ongoing crimes against humanity,” the letter said.

“We believe it’s long overdue for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet to investigate the 1988 massacre.”

The letter was organized by a London-based association of victims’ families called Justice for the Victims of the 1988 Massacre in Iran.

In the immediate aftermath of the war with Iraq and on orders of then-Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini, Iranian authorities executed thousands of political prisoners accused of betraying the state during the conflict.

By some estimates 30,000 were killed, many of them members of the Mujahedin-e Khalq, a revolutionary group that later fell out of favor with the regime.

Many of those prisoners were sent to their death by Iran’s current President Ebrahim Raisi, who served as a deputy prosecutor in Tehran at the time.

The US placed him on a sanctions list in 2019, citing the executions and other alleged rights abuses. He has denied involvement in the executions.

Among the letter’s signatories is Sang-Hyun Song, president of the ICC from 2009 to 2015; Jacques Santer, former prime minister of Luxembourg; Guy Verhofstadt, former prime minister of Belgium; and hundreds of former UN officials and human rights professionals.

Other signatories include former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams and 18 Nobel Laureates.

The letter is the latest in a series of calls by rights groups and others urging the UN to take action on the 1988 massacre, which remains controversial internationally as well as in Iran.


Snow carpeting Jerusalem’s holy sites, West Bank adds to refugees’ misery

Snow carpeting Jerusalem’s holy sites, West Bank adds to refugees’ misery
Updated 57 min 46 sec ago

Snow carpeting Jerusalem’s holy sites, West Bank adds to refugees’ misery

Snow carpeting Jerusalem’s holy sites, West Bank adds to refugees’ misery
  • Jordanian authorities urge people to stay home, keep off roads as heavy rain swells major dams
  • In Syria, days of heavy snowfall blanketed camps housing displaced people in the country’s northwest

AMMAN: Jerusalem and the eastern Mediterranean were on Thursday left carpeted in snow after a winter storm hit the region.

And in neighboring Jordan, heavy snowfall closed roads in Amman and made driving conditions treacherous throughout much of the country.

Jordan’s Meteorological Department forecast more snow on higher ground with temperatures again expected to fall below freezing.

Jordanians woke up on Thursday to a thick layer of snow covering homes and driveways. On Wednesday night, the region was affected by a depression coming from Greece and Turkey toward the eastern basin of the Mediterranean that coincided with a polar wave that hit Jordan, Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, and some parts of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Iraq.

In Syria, days of heavy snowfall blanketed camps housing displaced people in the country’s northwest, forcing families to huddle together under canvas in freezing conditions.

Abu Hussan, who lives with his family in a makeshift camp outside the city of Jisr Al-Shughur, told AFP: “We’ve been trapped in the snow for four days.”

The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said that at least 227 displacement sites throughout the northwest had been hit by severe winter weather since Jan. 18.

The agency added that 545 tents had been reported destroyed and 9,125 tents damaged by snowfall, floods, and high winds, along with the belongings of displaced people.

Schools in Jerusalem and northern Israel were closed, leaving children free to play in the snow. Israel’s meteorological service reported that up to 25 centimeters of snow had fallen on Wednesday night. It took until midday for snow ploughs to reopen the main highways leading into Jerusalem from the north, south, and west.

Amman, and northern and southern regions were covered in several inches of snow on Thursday, with authorities urging the public to stay at home and keep off roads amid warnings of more falls over the next 24 hours.

While Jordanian farmers have been complaining of frost devastating their crops with freezing weather conditions prevailing some days before the polar depression, recent rain has increased depleted water levels in Jordan’s major dams.

The Jordanian Water Ministry said on Thursday said that recent deluges had raised overall rainfall volumes for the season to 45 percent of Jordan’s long-term annual average of 8.1 billion cubic meters.

A total of 2.4 million cubic meters of water had poured into Jordan’s 10 major dams by Thursday morning, raising their storage to 98.5 mcm, 29.3 percent of their total capacity of 336.4 mcm, said a ministry statement.

Meanwhile, the Jordanian National Center for Security and Crisis Management warned on Thursday that the Waleh Dam in Madaba governorate, which was empty in November last year, would likely reach full capacity over the next 24 hours. Center officials, who are monitoring the current snow situation, added that the dam was only 2 mcm off hitting its full capacity of 9 mcm.

Jordan recently warned of an expected water deficit of 45 mcm in 2022.

On Nov. 22, the country signed a declaration of intent with Israel and the UAE to explore the feasibility of a joint energy-for-water project.

Defending the deal, Jordan’s Prime Minister Bisher Al-Khasawneh warned of “unprecedented” levels of water scarcity, adding that resource-poor Jordan would receive 200 mcm of water a year under the proposed project.

Addressing the lower house on Dec. 15, the PM said that Jordan’s annual water resources were less than 80 cubic meters per person, below the international threshold of 500 cubic meters per person.