‘The Red Sea Undiscovered’ presents little known Saudi traditions

From Tabuk to Jazan, the short episodes will take the viewers across the 1,700 km shoreline where the culture was heavily influenced by its surroundings. (Supplied)
From Tabuk to Jazan, the short episodes will take the viewers across the 1,700 km shoreline where the culture was heavily influenced by its surroundings. (Supplied)
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Updated 16 September 2021

‘The Red Sea Undiscovered’ presents little known Saudi traditions

From Tabuk to Jazan, the short episodes will take the viewers across the 1,700 km shoreline where the culture was heavily influenced by its surroundings. (Supplied)
  • The series meets the local peoples and highlights the traditions, in both cuisine and lifestyle, of the different areas

JEDDAH: A team of filmmakers who set off along Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea coast to capture some of the area’s hidden gems have presented their finds in a series of videos depicting the region’s cultural aspects.
“The Red Sea Undiscovered,” produced by The Red Sea Development Co., uses the power of visuals to reveal those treasures to tourists and locals alike.
Sultan Batawi, content production director at TRSDC, told Arab News that, while developing the project, the team came across some interesting and distinctive features that are little known outside the coastline region.
“They were worth sharing, not only to Saudis but to the world, especially since the destination will open its doors to visitors by the end of 2022,” he said.
The series meets the local peoples and highlights the traditions, in both cuisine and lifestyle, of the different areas. From Tabuk to Jazan, the short episodes will take the viewers across the 1,700 km shoreline where the culture was heavily influenced by its surroundings.
Rawan Al-Sebyyani, the assistant communication manager at TRSDC, spoke of the importance of highlighting the cultural aspects of a region: “Outsiders have not experienced anything like it, especially given how varied Saudi culture is in its dances, songs, and so much more.”
The first episode of “The Red Sea Undiscovered” shows the Al-Shabha folk dance, a traditional war dance in the small remote village of that name.
“Filming the dance was a unique experience,” Adham Alzanbagi, a senior filmmaking specialist, said. “Prior to this, I knew what our folk dance was, but to capture their unique movements and filming everything was intimidating.”
Abdullah Alghamdi, another film specialist at TRSDC, stated that since the hidden gems of the country have remained undiscovered for a very long time, it will require a lot of work to explore them. “That is what ‘The Red Sea Undiscovered’ is all about. We wish to guide people to see the beauty of such a mesmerizing part of the world that is filled with diversity.”
The team is looking to expand the series and publicize it through different media, such as billboards, magazines and interactive spaces. This way, the series will get exposure and act as a soft promotion for the destination when it is open to the public.