Saudi food festival kicks off next week in Jeddah

The authority is organizing the festival to provide a local platform that celebrates the Saudi culinary arts. (SPA)
The authority is organizing the festival to provide a local platform that celebrates the Saudi culinary arts. (SPA)
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Updated 04 December 2021

Saudi food festival kicks off next week in Jeddah

The authority is organizing the festival to provide a local platform that celebrates the Saudi culinary arts. (SPA)
  • Visitors can taste the ingredients and dishes that these regions are famous for and learn about their heritage

JEDDAH: The Culinary Arts Commission has announced the launch of the annual “Saudi Feast Food Festival” in historic Jeddah.

The festival, running from Dec. 7 to 15, celebrates the national culinary heritage by providing informative experiences for all groups of society.

The festival has four main sections. The first is devoted to the culinary heritage of the regions bordering the Red Sea (Tabuk, Madinah, Makkah, Jazan and Asir).

Visitors can taste the ingredients and dishes that these regions are famous for and learn about their heritage.

The second part includes instructive shows and events that combine music and food, as well as discussions with culinary experts.

The third has stores selling cookbooks and a market selling products related to the festival, while the fourth has restaurants and food stalls serving more than 35 Saudi heritage dishes for visitors.

The authority is organizing the festival to provide a local platform that celebrates the Saudi culinary arts. It also aims to present them as cultural products with important civilizational connotations, reflecting the richness, depth and diversity of Saudi cuisine in various regions of the Kingdom, in addition to showing the skills of Saudi chefs.


Saudi Arabia reports 4,526 new COVID-19 cases, 3 deaths

Saudi Arabia reports 4,526 new COVID-19 cases, 3 deaths
Updated 58 min 15 sec ago

Saudi Arabia reports 4,526 new COVID-19 cases, 3 deaths

Saudi Arabia reports 4,526 new COVID-19 cases, 3 deaths
  • The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom has increased to 617,114
  • A total of 8,927 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia announced three deaths from COVID-19 and 4,526 new infections on Wednesday.

Of the new cases, 1,489 were recorded in Riyadh, 472 in Jeddah, 198 in Hofuf, 194 in Makkah, 139 in Madinah, 137 in Dammam, and 119 in Jazan. Several other cities recorded less than one hundred new cases each.

The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom increased to 617,114 after 5,772 more patients recovered from the virus.

A total of 8,927 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far.

Nearly 56 million doses of a coronavirus vaccine have been administered in the Kingdom to date.


Saudi justice minister discusses cooperation with British counterpart

Saudi justice minister discusses cooperation with British counterpart
Updated 26 January 2022

Saudi justice minister discusses cooperation with British counterpart

Saudi justice minister discusses cooperation with British counterpart
  • Al-Samaani said that the Kingdom has achieved great qualitative leaps during the past years through its transformational projects and developing and improving all sectors

LONDON: Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Justice Dr. Walid Al-Samaani has met his British counterpart Dominic Raab in London to discuss ways to enhance cooperation in the judicial and justice fields between the two ministries.

Al-Samaani said that the Kingdom has achieved great qualitative leaps during the past years through its transformational projects and developing and improving all sectors.

He told Raab that “the interest and support of the Kingdom’s leadership contributed to a qualitative developmental shift in the judicial and justice sector in the Kingdom at its substantive and procedural levels,” Saudi Press Agency reported.

Al-Samaani said this included applying the concept of institutional justice, activating the specialized judiciary, supporting human rights, and digitizing judicial services in courts and notaries.

He also touched on Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s recent announcement to develop the specialized legislation system through four basic systems, including the system of evidence that was issued and will be implemented soon.

“This qualitative legislative development will achieve more justice, enhance judicial guarantees, will be consistent with international conventions, and responds to the digital and economic changes the world is witnessing by developing legal and preventive tools,” he said.

A number of British judicial leaders also attended the meeting and the visit is aimed at boosting mutual cooperation between the two countries in light of a memorandum of understanding signed between the two sides.
 


All the registrations and certificates you need to visit Saudi Arabia

Saudi nationals scan their documents at a digital-Immigration gate at the King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 16, 2021. (REUTERS)
Saudi nationals scan their documents at a digital-Immigration gate at the King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 16, 2021. (REUTERS)
Updated 26 January 2022

All the registrations and certificates you need to visit Saudi Arabia

Saudi nationals scan their documents at a digital-Immigration gate at the King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 16, 2021. (REUTERS)
  • Visitors face queues and quarantine for failing to match Saudi requirements

RIYADH: There are certain travel requirements that Saudis, expats and tourists need for entering Saudi Arabia.

The main requirement is a Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) negative test certificate, issued from a verified laboratory no more than 72 hours before departure to the Kingdom.

Travelers will also need vaccination certificates from Tawakkalna, and registration on the Muqeem and Quddum platforms.

Upon arrival, all travelers will have their temperature checked and they should be registered as immune from COVID-19.

FASTFACT

Quddum allows visitors to register and update their COVID-19-related health data at least 72 hours before arrival.

Immunity for non-Saudi citizens and non-residents as a fully vaccinated person over 12 with a booster dose from vaccines certified by the Kingdom and the World Health Organization, such as Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Moderna, or one dose of Johnson and Johnson’s inoculation.

An airport official checking temperature of a passenger at the King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh.

All guests have to submit proof of their vaccination via the Quddum platform, which has been launched to facilitate entry procedures.

Quddum allows visitors to register and update their COVID-19-related health data at least 72 hours before arrival.

Immunity for Saudi citizens is defined by their status on the Tawakkalna App, whereas for expats it requires full vaccination, provided that any doses received outside the Kingdom are registered via the Ministry of Health Platform through https://eservices.moh.gov.sa/CoronaVaccineRegistration

Speaking to Arab News about his travel experience, Jennesse John, who works at the King Saud University, said: “I have returned from Kerala, India to Saudi Arabia along with my family recently. It went very smoothly since we had two doses of the vaccine in Saudi Arabia before we traveled on vacation.”

He added: “All we did was follow Saudi Arabia’s travel regulations closely.”

Hanouf Albalawi, in Riyadh, told Arab News: “My colleague made a mistake, and it was that she did not register in Muqeem before visiting the Kingdom. She said she didn’t know she had to.

“When she arrived in Saudi Arabia, she had to create a new Tawakkalna, and she only had one week to stay, so the issue she faced was that her status in the Tawakkalna app did not change for her entire stay, which was five days.

“She couldn’t visit any of the places she had in mind. We contacted Tawakkalna customer service to ask if there is anything we can do to make this process faster, but unfortunately, there was no other way.”

Faiz Al-Najdi, an engineer in Riyadh, told Arab News: “I recently returned from vacation with my wife from my home city Karachi, Pakistan. At Riyadh, airport departure processes went smoothly. I had to show them copies of PCR, vaccination details, copies of Tawakkalna and Sehaty. However, upon arrival in Karachi it was a mess.

“They demanded to see the vaccination details online on Tawakkalna, but it was not working; we failed to open it. Many people like us suffered because of this issue. I had a long argument with them as to why they were demanding to see it online when I was showing them the photocopies of the vaccination details from Tawakkalna. I told them we had traveled from Riyadh, where authorities had checked and allowed us to travel, then they were satisfied. This left them with no answer but let us proceed,” he said.

“Upon arrival at Riyadh airport, things were ok. The official at the immigration desk was polite. She checked the PCR and Tawakkalna papers. I had those ready with me, and she stamped our passports and let us go,” he added.

Ayman Hassan, an Egyptian expat working in Riyadh, told Arab News: “Many of my friends and colleagues recently returned from Egypt. The procedures at the airport, they said, went very smoothly. They didn’t take too much time since they had already taken the two vaccine doses in Saudi Arabia before traveling on their vacations. All they had to do was to carefully follow travel guidelines: Negative COVID-19 RT-PCR report, vaccination certificates from Tawakkalna, and Muqeem registration.”

 


Saudi sculptor carves out a niche for himself

Nasser Hawsawi said his knowledge of the characteristics of various materials and types of soil, and his familiarity with 3D design, helped him develop his craft. (Supplied)
Nasser Hawsawi said his knowledge of the characteristics of various materials and types of soil, and his familiarity with 3D design, helped him develop his craft. (Supplied)
Updated 26 January 2022

Saudi sculptor carves out a niche for himself

Nasser Hawsawi said his knowledge of the characteristics of various materials and types of soil, and his familiarity with 3D design, helped him develop his craft. (Supplied)
  • Self-taught Nasser Hawsawi has proved a popular attraction at Riyadh Oasis

MAKKAH: The work of sculptor Nasser Hawsawi has been a hit with visitors to Riyadh Oasis, one of the 14 Zones set up around the capital during Riyadh Season.

An engineer by training, the 30-year-old Saudi from Makkah has only been sculpting for about four years and is self-taught but his work has already earned praise and acclaim — and a few famous fans.
“Sculpting is an authentic art that simulates shapes, individuals, harmony, rhythm, balance, visual pleasure and various dimensions in order to reach a certain artistic depth, conveying a high artistic sense by representing the details of the human form,” said Hawsawi.
He is exhibiting his work at Riyadh Oasis in a studio that is open to visitors. He has also given a number of live sculpting demonstrations during which he created sculptures of famous Arab singers while they performed on stage, including Nawal Al-Zoghbi, Majid Al-Mohandis and Assala Nasri, and then presented the finished pieces to them at the end of the show.

HIGHLIGHT

Nasser Hawsawi is exhibiting his work at Riyadh Oasis in a studio that is open to visitors. He has also given a number of live sculpting demonstrations during which he created sculptures of famous Arab singers while they performed on stage, including Nawal Al-Zoghbi, Majid Al-Mohandis and Assala Nasri, and then presented the finished pieces to them at the end of the show.

“Drawing on sand dunes sparked an interest in sculpting four years ago, which led me to acquire more knowledge about the art and the precision required to carve a beautiful sculpture,” said Hawsawi.
Thanks to his engineering background, he said his knowledge of the characteristics of various materials and types of soil, and his familiarity with 3D design, helped him develop his craft.
“It motivated me and made me passionate about seeing things from a different perspective that simulate the different angles of artworks,” he said.
He said that his passion for art grew to the point that he decided to leave his stressful engineering career behind to pursue his art.
“I started to feel psychological pressures from my job as a civil engineer working on the roads in the city of Makkah,” said Hawsawi.
“This pushed me to unload these pressures through drawing and sculpting with sand, clay and rocks. I was able to transform this mental exhaustion in the field of road design into an artistic explosion, through which I could breathe, while also living in its details and caring for its visual outcomes.”
He said that his works range in price from $1,000 to $5,000, depending on size and detail. He sells them at exhibitions or through his Instagram account, which has more than 19,000 followers.
Sculptures of women require more work than those of men, he said, because they have more delicate features that demand more attention and precision. The materials he uses are sourced from outside the Kingdom.
“I use clay, with which I have established a strong artistic bond, while also carving on gypsum,” he said.
In addition to his participation in Riyadh Season, Hawsawi has taken part in other events, including the 90th Saudi National Day celebrations in 2020 at the King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture, under the patronage of Jeddah municipality. He also exhibited at Art Market, an exhibition at Adham Art Center in Jeddah, and Salam Ya Beirut, an exhibition at Haider Art Center, also in Jeddah.
“During Riyadh Season, I had the chance to meet the public and communicate with them,” Hawsawi said. “I also presented artworks inspired by mankind, horses and eagles.
“My philosophy is drawn from the environment and from the things I like to draw, along with the things I have witnessed and experienced.”


Internal audit conference begins in Riyadh

Hussam bin Abdulmohsen Al-Angari. (SPA)
Hussam bin Abdulmohsen Al-Angari. (SPA)
Updated 26 January 2022

Internal audit conference begins in Riyadh

Hussam bin Abdulmohsen Al-Angari. (SPA)
  • Around 30 local and international leaders and experts are participating in the conference in the internal audit and monitoring system fields

RIYADH: The eighth conference for internal audit started on Tuesday under the title “The future of internal audit.”
During the event’s inauguration ceremony, Hussam bin Abdulmohsen Al-Angari, president of the General Court of Audit, highlighted the importance of the issues to be discussed, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
Al-Angari said the conference was considered an important gathering for professionals and those interested in internal audit in the Kingdom, with the participation of leaders and local and international experts who would discuss and suggest the best professional solutions and practices according to the latest international developments.
Abdullah Al-Shbili, CEO of the Saudi Institute for Internal Auditors, said the conference aimed to review developments in the internal audit profession and the monitoring system globally, draw the future of the profession according to international changes and developments, and enhance the features of flexible leadership in the internal audit profession in realization of Saudi Vision 2030.
Around 30 local and international leaders and experts are participating in the conference in the internal audit and monitoring system fields, as well as several representatives of global organizations and companies, including the CEO of the Institute of Internal Auditors Anthony J. Pugliese, to discuss the top challenges facing the audit profession and suggest the best solutions and practices.