EgyptAir ‘Green Service Flights’ to cut single-use plastics 

A new “Green Service Flight” logo will mark all sustainable flights and EgyptAir is offering a 40 percent discount on the Cairo to Paris flight. (Reuters/File Photo)
A new “Green Service Flight” logo will mark all sustainable flights and EgyptAir is offering a 40 percent discount on the Cairo to Paris flight. (Reuters/File Photo)
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Updated 19 January 2022

EgyptAir ‘Green Service Flights’ to cut single-use plastics 

A new “Green Service Flight” logo will mark all sustainable flights and EgyptAir is offering a 40 percent discount on the Cairo to Paris flight. (Reuters/File Photo)
  • Saturday’s flight, from Cairo, Egypt to Paris, France, will be the first of its kind for an African airline

CAIRO: EgyptAir will operate a new environmentally friendly service on Saturday as part ‘Green Service Flights,’ a new program to combat climate change and pollution.

The new flight category aims to eliminate single-use plastics and pollution. Saturday’s flight, from Cairo, Egypt to Paris, France, will be the first of its kind for an African airline.

Mohamed Manar, Egyptian minister of civil aviation, said that the Egyptian aviation sector “attaches great importance to confronting the effects of climate change.”

Environmental sustainability will be achieved through an “integrated ecosystem” that applies international legalislation to domestic aviation standards, he added.

According to the minister, EgyptAir’s future plan aims to reduce single-use plastics on flights by 90 percent. The airline has identified 27 single-use plastic products, which have been replaced with sustainable alternatives.

A new “Green Service Flight” logo will mark all sustainable flights.

EgyptAir is offering a 40 percent discount on the Cairo to Paris flight.

International Air Transport Association data shows that a single passenger on a short or long-term flight produces about 1.43 kilograms of waste, much of it single-use plastics, which threatens human health and marine life.


How Saudi Arabia can become the vanguard of sustainable tourism

How Saudi Arabia can become the vanguard of sustainable tourism
Updated 22 May 2022

How Saudi Arabia can become the vanguard of sustainable tourism

How Saudi Arabia can become the vanguard of sustainable tourism
  • An agreement with Jamaica puts resilient tourism at the heart of the industry’s post-pandemic recovery
  • The pandemic highlighted the vulnerability of tourism not only to pandemics but also extreme weather

LONDON: Saudi Arabia is stepping up its efforts to become the vanguard of a UN pledge to develop a sustainable model of tourism after the sector’s levels of resilience were pushed to breaking point by the pandemic and new dire warnings of tourism’s environmental footprint emerged.

Addressing the UN General Assembly on May 6, Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Tourism Ahmed Al-Khateeb said lessons about tourism’s vulnerability to sudden, unexpected events must be taken from the pandemic — which cost the sector 62 million jobs worldwide — and changes made.

“COVID-19 highlighted the vulnerability of the sector, not only to pandemics but also to the effects of extreme weather, so addressing climate change must be at the heart of building a more resilient tourism, and there is no resilience without sustainability,” he said.

“We must work collaboratively, putting sustainable, resilient tourism at the heart of inclusive recovery. Only by doing these things together will we ensure better and more resilient futures for the millions around the world reliant on tourism.”

A partial view shows an ancient Nabataean carved tomb at the archaeological site of Hegra, near the northwestern Saudi city of AlUla. (Photo by 

The UN’s World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) welcomed the Saudi efforts, noting that the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 has already provided the blueprint for a “transformative and deeply ambitious” economic strategy, and could do the same for tourism.

A spokesperson for the UNWTO told Arab News: “This ambitious plan aims to reshape the social and cultural landscape, accelerating growth through strategic investment, new industries and leadership.

“It is an opportunity to bring Saudi Arabia’s heritage, culture and hospitality to the world; and deliver on climate and sustainability goals. Properly managed, tourism can play a key role in achieving this vision.”

Scientists have said CO2 emissions from tourism will increase by 25 percent by 2030 compared to 2016 levels, which if left unaddressed could be a bullet for the sector as visitors begin to factor in the impact, and morality, of climate change on their destination choices.

Signaling the Kingdom’s intent to become the shepherd to sustainability, Al-Khateeb and his Jamaican counterpart, Edmund Bartlett, signed earlier this month a memorandum of understanding to collaborate on developing sustainable and resilient tourism between the two countries.

Part of the agreement also included determination to not only embrace the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development but to lay out a blueprint that can be rolled out globally for a sustainable model of tourism.

The Taif rose season draws visitors from Saudi Arabia and beyond. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)

Although firm details on the blueprint have yet to emerge, the UNWTO spokesperson noted that policymakers are “best placed” to play a central role so long as their policies include aims to reduce environmental impacts of consumption and production patterns.

“National tourism planning is a well-established practice among national authorities with national tourism policies covering on average a time frame of 10 years and addressing the same thematic areas across regions,” the spokesperson added.

“Aspects such as human resource development, investment, marketing and promotion, employment, product development and diversification have been factored into the policies as these are relevant aspects for the sustainable economic development of tourism.”

Jonathon Day, associate professor and Marriott School of Hospitality and Tourism Management graduate program director, applauded the Kingdom’s “ambition and commitment,” believing it could become a leader in sustainable development.

“Tourism developed sustainably has the potential to contribute substantially to sustainability challenges faced by Saudi Arabia and the world, and I’m sure that through tourism Saudi Arabia can join the destinations leading in sustainable development,” Day told Arab News.

“The Kingdom has the resources to invest in infrastructure to support sustainability goals and knows that tourism that doesn’t adopt the principles of sustainability can make sustainability issues worse. It requires commitment to achieve positive outcomes.”

Day is not alone in seeing Saudi Arabia’s financial resources as key in any effort it may make to lead the way in green tourism, with Prof. Willy Legrand of the International University of Applied Sciences believing it “would translate” in attracting talent and developing policy.

AlUla, home to Saudi Arabia’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site, is at the heart of the Kingdom’s tourism ambitions. (Courtesy: Royal Commission of AlUla)

“Not only this, the resources allow the country to develop and implement state of the art (existing) solutions as well as being a pipeline for the testing of new solutions to tackle some of the greater tourism challenges,” Legrand told Arab News.

Architect and sustainable tourism consultant Amine Ahlafi said that while Saudi Arabia had only recently opened for tourism more broadly, it was important to remember it had a rich history of religious tourism, and this was something it could learn from.

Anywhere from 2.5 million to 9 million pilgrims travel to the Kingdom each year, Ahlafi told Arab News that this results in around 15 million plastic cups being used to cater to the water needs of everyone traveling.

“You can of course use technology to recycle all the disposable cups, but sustainable tourism should be about finding ways to raise awareness so that we don’t have to rely on technology,” he said.

“As for developing new tourism, I think they should promote the desert potential of tourism as they can market it as a very interesting place for sustainable tourism — which does not mean they have to reduce the quality.

“We can do luxury combined with sustainability and not in a greenwashing way with the design of luxury desert camps that optimize the natural resources, the sun and the wind for energy.”

Ahlafi said a blueprint would need to be predicated on pushing technology and the habitat you find yourself in. “Technology is the tool, not the solution, the solution is building to suit the environment, not trying to have the environment suit you.”

Legrand said the Kingdom’s capacity to achieve its aims would depend on a “declaration of transparency” in which it not only set out its goals but communicated actions undertaken and results achieved.

Day said it was also important to construct the blueprint not as a series of steps that would work for every country but rather to realize it as a list of questions that all countries could ask of themselves.

“Sustainability and sustainable tourism are ‘wicked problems,’ which means there are many things that need to be done, and it requires many organizations and parts of government to work to achieve common goals,” Day said.

“And while there are a common set of tasks, each destination will have different priorities. So, the questions may be the same — but the answers may be different. For instance, Saudi Arabia probably will focus on water conservation more than some destinations.”

Legrand agreed that the Kingdom’s ability to produce a global blueprint would depend on its ability to recognize that there would be “no one size fits all” approach, but rather a series of questions and inclusion of all stakeholders in the process.

He suggested the questions could include: What are hoteliers’ views on sustainability? Are the restaurateurs capitalizing on local agriculture? Are local communities involved? What are the challenges for these different actors? Are the destination marketers aware?

But he also noted that there were “clear, key topics” that would need to be addressed in a global, universalized manner, not least of which is the elephant in the room: Long-haul air travel.

“Long-haul travel remains a major challenge on the emission front and will remain so for the years to come, although airlines are making progress both in terms of efficiencies and fuel technologies,” he said.

“Transparency at the booking stage is critical to make the right decisions about a trip, here Travalyst and its many members are making progress in providing travelers with that information, such as the carbon footprint of specific airline routes, for example.”

Both Day and Legrand agreed that for Saudi Arabia to meet its ambitions as the vanguard in a push towards sustainable tourism, the country would need to hang its efforts around the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals for industry, not least “collaboration and cooperation.”

They face many challenges, foremost of which is improving citizens’ trust in state institutions.

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Return of the leopard is at the heart of plans to conserve and regenerate Saudi Arabia’s landscapes and wildlife
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New survey reveals GCC residents’ travel intentions as world opens up post-pandemic

New survey reveals GCC residents’ travel intentions as world opens up post-pandemic
Updated 19 May 2022

New survey reveals GCC residents’ travel intentions as world opens up post-pandemic

New survey reveals GCC residents’ travel intentions as world opens up post-pandemic

DUBAI: As Joni Mitchell observed: “You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That has certainly proved true for travel since the onset of the COVID-pandemic saw worldwide restrictions on movement cause the industry to grind to a halt in early 2020. 

Many feared airlines and hotels would be struggling for years to come, but at this month’s Arabian Travel Market in Dubai, experts were bullish about the near future, with recovery looking extremely healthy. The ability to hop across borders for a long weekend or a summer vacation, or even a work trip — has now become something precious; the chance to escape everyday routine has become more alluring than ever. 

“Travel has moved from something that we took for granted to something that, now, we really need,” Paul Kelly, managing partner of Dubai-based consumer-insight company D/A, told Arab News. “That’s something that came through in this analysis: This huge pent-up demand — the emotional side of traveling has changed a lot.”

Residents of the GCC are eager to get travelling again, as research that D/A presented at the travel market proved. The company assessed millions of social media and online posts with its AI-driven “Sila” tool to discover the travel intentions and desires of more than 2.2 million Arab speakers across the GCC. What D/A found was that while many of the favored destinations remain the same (with one major exception — more on that later), the reasons for visiting them have changed significantly. It seems people are longing for relaxation in natural surroundings, along with cultural experiences, more than they are looking for shopping destinations and material acquisition.

“Visiting cities for shopping used to be much (more popular). It was never as big as the ‘Beach Holidays,’ category, but ‘Shopping’ was always number two,” Kelly said. “It’s now the lowest. Beach destinations are still number one — for instance, since the pandemic, visitor numbers to the Maldives from the GCC are higher than ever. But the ‘Nature and Mountains’ category — so, lakes, for example; think Switzerland more than the Maldives — has become much more popular. And cultural tourism — say, music festivals, art events, and general cultural experiences — has also become far more important, especially among younger people.”

Here are some of the main findings from D/A’s research.

SAUDI RISING 

One country has seen a major increase in interest over the past three years: Saudi Arabia. While the glitz of the UAE — and particularly Dubai — remains in high demand, the Kingdom is now the second-most desirable destination for travelers from the GCC, according to D/A’s research. “Saudi has become a really big destination. That was never the case previously, except for pilgrims, but this research discounts religious travel,” Kelly explained. Clearly, the Saudi authorities’ efforts over the past few years to position the country as an attractive tourism destination have been a huge success. More and more Saudis are looking to take short breaks in their own country, and travelers from the Emirates, Oman and other GCC countries are taking the opportunity to explore the rich culture and stunning landscapes that had previously been all-but-impossible to access.

“This has all been driven by what’s currently open — festivals like MDLBEAST, the Riyadh and Jeddah seasons, AlUla, the sporting events,” Kelly said. “That stuff works.”

THINK LOCAL 

The top three destinations for GCC travelers were all in the Gulf: The UAE, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. This is a recent development, according to Kelly. “The Gulf countries were never really factors before – apart from the obvious, Dubai, which has always been a beacon for the Middle East. But what’s been interesting is the rise of Qatar, because of the World Cup, and then Saudi as well,” he said.

“Khaleejis like going for short breaks — five days or something. And a lot of people, for those breaks, are now staying within the GCC. Saudi hasn’t overtaken the UAE yet, but it’s really come up as a tourism destination,” he continued. “The whole concept of staycation within the region has really come up — people are staying for longer periods too. Shorter stays are much more valued now.” 

TURKISH DELIGHT

Turkey is one of the most desirable international locations for GCC travelers, according to D/A’s research. It’s always been popular, but what the social-media chatter suggests is that people aren’t just heading to the big cities anymore — instead it’s the country’s mixture of “beach and mountains” that is attracting attention, with its Mediterranean areas proving especially in demand.

FAMILIARITY BREEDS CONTENT

While GCC travelers are eager for new experiences, they’re also looking for the reassurance of the familiar. So destinations like the UK, the US and Thailand remain extremely desirable, but, Kelly said, they are now looking for new experiences in places where they may have been several times before. 

“What we found across most of the countries is that there’s a big movement towards new experiences, even in really familiar settings,” Kelly said. “So they like to go to the same places — London, for example, is a big destination. But while they’re in London, they want to do something different, maybe be there a bit longer and go out into the countryside. There’s also an eagerness to fill out itineraries a bit more, do more things.”

FORBIDDEN FRUIT

“People really wanted to go to the countries that closed their borders early because of COVID,” Kelly said. “You want to do what you can’t do, I guess.” China and Japan were the main beneficiaries of this particular quirk of our brains, with both featuring prominently on the wishlist of destinations in the Far East for GCC travelers. China, in particular, is a desirable place for studying for GCC residents, D/A found.


Jeddah park’s carnival opening marks start of season of activities

One of Saudi artist Meead Anwar Abulata’s live paintings portrayed a lady in a dress with hues of blue. (AN photo/Huda Bashatah)
One of Saudi artist Meead Anwar Abulata’s live paintings portrayed a lady in a dress with hues of blue. (AN photo/Huda Bashatah)
Updated 14 May 2022

Jeddah park’s carnival opening marks start of season of activities

One of Saudi artist Meead Anwar Abulata’s live paintings portrayed a lady in a dress with hues of blue. (AN photo/Huda Bashatah)
  • Covering an area of 140,000 square meters, the park, that cost nearly SR80 million ($21 million) to build, can accommodate 54,000 people

JEDDAH: A carnival-style parade on Wednesday marked the opening of a Jeddah park to visitors as part of the Red Sea port city’s annual festival of activities.

Entertainers in colorful costumes led a procession that included stilt walkers and unicyclists during an inauguration ceremony for Prince Majid Park attended by Jeddah Gov. Prince Saud bin Abdullah bin Jalawi.

A host of artistic, cultural, and recreational events have been lined up to entertain Jeddah Season 2022 crowds.

Prince Majid Park in Al-Rabwah district is one of the city’s main attractions and will be welcoming visitors free of charge. Activities and entertainment will include live performances, diverse cultural folklore, recreational events for children, shopping booths, a carnival area for challenges and games, a horror house experience, and a cultural celebration week.

HIGHLIGHT

Prince Majid Park in Al-Rabwah district is one of the city’s main attractions and will be welcoming visitors free of charge. Activities and entertainment will include live performances, diverse cultural folklore, recreational events for children, shopping booths, a carnival area for challenges and games, a horror house experience, and a cultural celebration week.

Covering an area of 140,000 square meters, the park, that cost nearly SR80 million ($21 million) to build, can accommodate 54,000 people. Visitors are greeted by a 30-meter-high interactive fountain that dances and sways to the sound of music and there is also a 9,730-square-meter children’s play area.

The 900-meter-long pedestrian pathways and 1,800 meters of routes for cyclists and scooters are decorated with 918 trees and 382 palm trees as part of efforts to satisfy one of the Saudi Vision 2030 goals to increase the amount of green and recreational spaces.

Faisal Al-Shaalan, founder of the shop Gharsa, has set up an educational and agricultural booth in the park to introduce children to the concept of planting.

“I turned it into a cultural business project to spread the concept of the importance of agriculture and its impact on the internal and external environment,” he told Arab News.

“It is necessary to make the children harness their energies into something that benefits the environment and them. They need to make a physical and intellectual effort. Parents must find useful hobbies for them, including agriculture,” Al-Shaalan said.

On the character-building aspect of the hobby, he added: “What distinguishes planting is that it makes the child take responsibility to follow up and water the plants and take care of them, which develops the child’s sense of responsibility.”

The park has an open theater that accommodates more than 1,000 spectators, and an events area covering 5,624 square meters.

Saudi artist Meead Anwar Abulata, said: “I’m glad to be participating in Jeddah Season alongside other Saudi painters to offer the park’s visitors a captivating live art show.”

One of Abulata’s live paintings portrayed a lady in a dress with hues of blue. “In the painting, I mimic the shades of deep blue waters on the ballerina’s dress to convey the relationship between the deep sea and the depth and fluidity of women’s emotions.

“It also expresses that the sea is deep and contains secrets and surprises, like the endless potential and ambition of women and what they provide in today’s Saudi Arabia,” she added.

The park will also be hosting an international bazaar featuring accessories and products reflecting the cultures of various countries, in addition to service areas, restaurants, and cafes.

Jeddah Season is part of the Saudi Seasons initiative, launched to enrich the lives of people in the Kingdom and promote the country as an important world tourist destination.

The annual festival aims to highlight the city’s rich heritage and culture through a total of 2,800 activities in nine zones over the event period.

Being held under the title, Our Lovely Days, the second Jeddah Season follows on from the success of Riyadh Season that recorded more than 15 million visits over five months.

Jeddah Season offers 70 interactive experiences, more than 60 recreational activities, seven Arab and two international plays, marine events, a circus, four international exhibitions, and a host of other services for families.

Its nine zones will hold events related to their historical and cultural aspect of their location and function. Tickets are available at https://jeddahseason.sa/index.html.

 


Saadiyat Island plans to attract 19m tourists, raise AED4.2bn by 2025

Saadiyat Island plans to attract 19m tourists, raise AED4.2bn by 2025
Updated 12 May 2022

Saadiyat Island plans to attract 19m tourists, raise AED4.2bn by 2025

Saadiyat Island plans to attract 19m tourists, raise AED4.2bn by 2025

DUBAI: The urge for a weekend getaway has never been stronger since pandemic restrictions have finally begun to ease across the region. But the question remains: Where exactly should you go?

You can’t go wrong with the laidback charms of Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island. The postcard-worthy destination, now under the management of Miral, the real estate development company responsible for Yas Island, has recently announced a new vision and strategy to bolster the emirate’s tourism sector.

Saleh Mohamed Al-Geziry, director general of tourism at Abu Dhabi’s Department of Culture, and Mohamed Abdalla Al-Zaabi, chief executive officer of Miral, announced the news alongside a new campaign video for Saadiyat Island with the slogan “One Island. Many Journeys” during the 2022 Arabian Travel Market, which kicked off at the Dubai World Trade Center on May 9.

“Saadiyat Island is undoubtedly one of Abu Dhabi’s finest treasures. We look forward to elevating awareness of Saadiyat’s enriching experiences as part of Abu Dhabi’s wider offering. From culture and entertainment to amazing landmarks and natural landscapes — all within close proximity to one another — Abu Dhabi is a must-visit destination,” said Al-Geziry during a press conference at ATM.

“We are honored and excited to be spearheading Saadiyat Island’s new strategy to position (it) as the destination of choice, providing visitors with enriching luxury experiences,” said Al-Zaabi. “With such a unique offering, from diverse cultural institutions including the iconic Louvre Museum, to pristine white beaches and undisturbed wildlife, Saadiyat Island is well-positioned to boost Abu Dhabi’s tourism sector,” he added.

It’s not uncommon to see a gazelle grazing outside your beach villa. Supplied

In addition to a number of luxury hotels and resorts, pristine white sand beaches, high-end restaurants, retail outlets and natural wildlife — it’s not uncommon to see a gazelle grazing outside your beach villa — the natural island is establishing itself as one of the world’s leading cultural centers.

The idyllic island is already home to the first international outpost of the iconic Louvre Museum and there are plenty of cultural hotspots set to cut the ribbon in Saadiyat within the next few years, including the hotly anticipated Guggenheim Museum, which is being designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Set to be one of the largest Guggenheim museums in the world, the venue is anticipated to open its doors in 2026.

Abu Dhabi has also unveiled plans for the Natural History Museum Abu Dhabi, which will feature some of the rarest wonders of natural history ever found. Currently under construction in the emirate’s Saadiyat Cultural District, the museum is also set to open in 2025.

The idyllic island is home to the first international outpost of the iconic Louvre Museum. Supplied

There’s also the Abrahamic Family House, designed by architect Sir David Adjaye, which plans to open later this year. The project, which was first unveiled during a global gathering in New York in 2019, coinciding with the UAE’s “Year of Tolerance,” aims to capture the values shared between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, through three main buildings, including a mosque, church and synagogue.

Cultural institutions aside, the natural island, which is a short plane ride away from Saudi Arabia or within driving distance of the city if you’re from Dubai, is rapidly shaping up to be the ideal escape for those seeking ultimate relaxation, luxury and comfort.

The island boasts five luxurious waterfront hotels including regional pioneers Rotana, Jumeirah and Rixos, in addition to global leaders Park Hyatt and St. Regis.

For city dwellers seeking a unique hideaway, a boutique villa retreat located on Nurai Island can be reached in 15 minutes by speedboat from a private pier on Saadiyat Island. Dubbed the “Maldives of Abu Dhabi,” the idyllic sanctuary boasts 32 beach villas, all equipped with private infinity pools, an around-the-clock butler, and four high-end restaurants to pick and choose from, proving to be an ideal hideaway for city dwellers seeking relaxation. The properties are nestled right within the dunes and at night, you can hear the waves crash.

“There’s so much coming up in Saadiyat Island that’s just going to add on to what tourists and residents can enjoy,” said Al-Geziry. “We are really looking forward to working closely with Miral to make sure the numbers grow exponentially in both Saadiyat and Abu Dhabi as an overall tourist destination,” he added.

Under the new management, Saadiyat Island is expected to attract 19 million visitors and contribute AED4.2 billion in direct tourism revenue by 2025.


Abu Dhabi launches ‘Summer Like You Mean It’ tourism campaign

Abu Dhabi launches ‘Summer Like You Mean It’ tourism campaign
Updated 08 May 2022

Abu Dhabi launches ‘Summer Like You Mean It’ tourism campaign

Abu Dhabi launches ‘Summer Like You Mean It’ tourism campaign
  • New offers including the Abu Dhabi summer pass will be rolled out with promotions
  • Prices at top hotels across Abu Dhabi in summer will be 30 percent less than during high season

DUBAI: Abu Dhabi has launched a new destination campaign to attract travellers to the UAE's capital during the summer.

The new campaign showcases unique and memorable experiences that visitors to Abu Dhabi can experience during the summer, Emirates News Agency reported.

There is something for everyone and activities vary from swimming with tiger sharks at the National Aquarium to taking a ride on the world’s fastest roller coaster at Ferrari World Abu Dhabi and stargazing in the desert at night.

Those interested in culture and history can visit the Qasr Al-Hosn and Qasr Al-Watan palaces, whilst those wanting to channel their inner peace can participate in yoga sessions at sunrise in the iconic surroundings of Louvre Abu Dhabi.

New offers including the Abu Dhabi summer pass will be rolled out with promotions across experiences, cultural sites, and family entertainment attractions.

The pass will give visitors access to three leading theme parks (Warner Bros. World Abu Dhabi, Ferrari World Abu Dhabi and Yas Waterworld Abu Dhabi), all cultural sites including Louvre Abu Dhabi, Qasr Al-Watan presidential palace, Qasr Al-Hosn, and free transportation via Yas Express and Abu Dhabi bus systems.

Specific details will be unveiled in the coming weeks as the pass is rolled out.

Prices at top hotels across the city in summer will also be 30 percent less than during high season.

“Global travellers have their eyes on the Middle East, so now is the perfect time to be sharing Abu Dhabi with the world, shining a light on just how many unique and diverse experiences are waiting to be explored affordably in and around the UAE’s capital,” the Director General of Tourism at Abu Dhabi’s Department of Culture and Tourism, Saleh Mohamed Al-Geziry, said.

“This summer, we want travellers to experience the known and unknown of Abu Dhabi, uncovering the hidden gems of our destination – at their own pace, whether it’s the thrills of our world class indoor theme parks or the race of the Yas Marina Circuit, to the rich depth of culture and activities that ensure the whole family is inspired and entertained,” Al-Geziry added.

“The UAE capital has something for everyone. We want to make those precious memories more accessible by providing competitive and compelling offers throughout the season so travellers can experience summer exactly as it can and should be enjoyed.”