REVIEW: Adar Art Hub

Photo/Supplied
Photo/Supplied
Short Url
Updated 24 June 2022

REVIEW: Adar Art Hub

Photo/Supplied
  • Apart from the creative aspect of the place, Adar Art Hub has excellent coffee options, teas and desserts. I usually order their lemon iced tea, or a pot of jasmine tea when I’m with my family and friends

Adar Art Hub is a great place for artists of all kinds. Painters, wood whittlers, sketchers, calligraphers as well as parents and their children can enjoy this space every day from 8 a.m. to midnight.

The art cafe offers different sizes of canvases, at varying prices, and a wide collection of paint brushes for all types of strokes. There is also paint in a variety of colors that customers are free to use after purchasing a canvas.

I enjoy going to Adar Art Hub very much because it feels wonderful to be surrounded by a community of artists that support your hobbies. I dabble in sketching sometimes, and the more I visit, the more I am encouraged to improve my skills.

Apart from the creative aspect of the place, Adar Art Hub has excellent coffee options, teas and desserts. I usually order their lemon iced tea, or a pot of jasmine tea when I’m with my family and friends.

Adar Art Hub is also an excellent place for bibliophiles as visitors can find a high pile of books to read for free. I sometimes grab one while my artist friends continue to paint; it provides a very wholesome quality time for visitors.

In addition, the place has some of the best Arabic board games such as “Lakhma,” “Akfosh” and “Gool bas La Tgool,” along with chess and UNO options.

It is an all-in-all fun place to hang out with friends and family because of the great choice of activities.

It is on the fourth floor of the Link Building on Prince Sultan Road in Al-Rawdah district, Jeddah.


Artist Osman Yousefzada unveils new installations in London 

Artist Osman Yousefzada unveils new installations in London 
Updated 16 min 45 sec ago

Artist Osman Yousefzada unveils new installations in London 

Artist Osman Yousefzada unveils new installations in London 

DUBAI: British Afghani Pakistan multi-disciplinary artist Osman Yousefzada has unveiled a series of installations titled “What is Seen and What is Not” at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum.

Running until Sept. 25, the artworks respond to Pakistan's 75th Independence Day and explore themes of displacement, movement and migration.

“What is Seen and What is Not” runs until Sept. 25. (Supplied)

The site-specific works created by Yousefzada, who is also a world-famous fashion designer, bring together textiles, wrapped objects and a seating installation.

“It’s a great honor to be commissioned to reflect on the 75 years of Pakistan’s independence,” said the artist in a released statement. “‘What is Seen and What is Not’ offers a portrait of contemporary Pakistan, through a British diasporic lens as it attempts to reel away from colonial subjugation.”


Saudi Arabia among top 5 overseas markets as ‘Bullet Train’ rakes in $62.5M

Saudi Arabia among top 5 overseas markets as ‘Bullet Train’ rakes in $62.5M
Updated 23 min 9 sec ago

Saudi Arabia among top 5 overseas markets as ‘Bullet Train’ rakes in $62.5M

Saudi Arabia among top 5 overseas markets as ‘Bullet Train’ rakes in $62.5M

LOS ANGELES: The stylized action romp “Bullet Train,” starring Brad Pitt, earned $62.5 million worldwide over its opening weekend, according to studio estimates this week, with Saudi Arabia earning a spot on the overseas play ranking.

The film racked up $32.4 million at the international box office and $30.1 million on the domestic charts.

Overseas play was led by the UK with a $3.5 million start, followed by France at $3.1 million, Mexico delivering $3 million, Australia rolling to $2.2 million and Saudi Arabia clocking $1.9 million.

The UAE ranked sixth, delivering $1.3 million.

The “Bullet Train” debut for Sony Pictures was solid but unspectacular for a movie that cost $90 million to make and was propelled by Pitt’s substantial star power. Even if it holds well in coming weeks, movie theaters have no major studio releases on the horizon for the rest of August, and few sure things to look forward to in early fall.


Saudi artist with a disability blows minds with his paintings

Ahmed Hakeem’s paintings were displayed at Markaz Al-Oun Bazaar. (Supplied)
Ahmed Hakeem’s paintings were displayed at Markaz Al-Oun Bazaar. (Supplied)
Updated 08 August 2022

Saudi artist with a disability blows minds with his paintings

Ahmed Hakeem’s paintings were displayed at Markaz Al-Oun Bazaar. (Supplied)
  • Ahmed Hakeem’s love of creativity helps him to forget the difficulties he faces to draw some amazing art pieces
  • Hakeem has not let his disability be an impediment to what he likes doing, which is painting

RIYADH: With joy, Ahmed Hakeem holds his brush, starts picking vibrant colors, and then he paints cubic and abstract shapes on an empty canvas.

Hakeem is a 34-year-old Saudi artist who has a mild intellectual disability. Individuals with mild ID are slower in all areas of conceptual development and social and daily living skills.

But Hakeem’s love of art helps him to forget the difficulties he faces as a person with a disability to draw some amazing art pieces. He has not let his disability be an impediment to what he likes doing, which is painting.

Not only that he is good at painting, but he is also an athlete. He is a good swimmer, he plays basketball, he loves running, he has won bronze and silver medals in sports.

He is also good at ping pong, padel, hiking, and loves animals.

During the pandemic, Hakeem unleashed his creative side and started to learn to paint. He enrolled in classes, and he started drawing abstract and cubic art.

FASTFACTS

• Hakeem is a 34-year- old Saudi artist who has a mild intellectual disability. Individuals with mild ID are slower in all areas of conceptual development and social and daily living skills.

• He has not let his disability be an impediment to what he likes doing, which is painting.

• He is also an athlete. He is a good swimmer, he plays basketball, he loves running, he has won bronze and silver medals in sports.

His paintings were displayed at Markaz Al-Oun Bazaar, which is a help center and non-profit organization that helps people with intellectual disabilities, and he wants to have his own gallery in the future.

Hakeem, who works at Juffali Heavy Equipment as an assistant, also talked about how hard it is for people with disabilities to find a good job.

“You need to know about the challenges that I am having with the community in general. Most people with disabilities are usually unemployed and don’t have access to powerful governmental aid, but their families have to enroll them in special clubs, and this can be financially stressful to the parents, so there is a lack of community and activities for us,” Hakeem told Arab News.

Nour Hakeem, his sister, said: “Because Hakeem looks normal and is not in a wheelchair, many places we go, they see him as a normal person, and every time we go out, I have to have proof that he is mentally challenged, which is very hard.”

“Even though the plane’s tickets are more expensive than the economy ticket and the discount they give us isn’t that much, so basically we book him a normal economy ticket but hopefully with time this is going to change soon because there is more attention by the authorities on people with disabilities,” she said.

According to APD, the official association of people with disabilities, the percentage of people with disabilities in the Kingdom is 7.1 percent, or 1,445,723 people out of a population 32.94 million. The association is set to organize its efforts and build an integrated institutional system to remove barriers to people with disabilities and empower them to live in society without discrimination.

 


Review: ‘Thirteen Lives’ pays tribute to real-world heroics of Thai rescue mission

Review: ‘Thirteen Lives’ pays tribute to real-world heroics of Thai rescue mission
Updated 07 August 2022

Review: ‘Thirteen Lives’ pays tribute to real-world heroics of Thai rescue mission

Review: ‘Thirteen Lives’ pays tribute to real-world heroics of Thai rescue mission

LONDON: When details began to emerge of the daring rescue of a Thai football team from flooded caves in Tham Luang Nang Non, it seemed only a matter of time before Hollywood swooped in to buff the real-life drama with the polish of a big-budget movie adaptation. Happily, “Thirteen Lives” is more than a shameless cash in. Director Ron Howard treads carefully, telling the story of a truly monumental international rescue effort which eventually expanded to include more than 10,000 people. Rather than attempting to only superficially capture that sense of scale, however, Howard focuses in on a few crucial players — the British dive team who first located the boys, the small group who planned and orchestrated the rescue of the 12 young players and their coach, the local governor tasked with bringing everybody home, the Thai engineer working with locals to divert the floodwaters, and the Thai Navy SEALs who spearheaded the initial response.

 

 

For the most part, this focused approach works well. Viggo Mortensen and Colin Farrell (questionable English accents aside) are excellent as divers Richard Stanton and John Volanthen, as are co-stars Joel Edgerton (as Australian Richard Harris) and Sahajak Boonthanakit as Governor Narongsak. Though the famous faces inevitably get the lion’s share of the screentime, Howard does his best to tell more than just the tale of the Western saviors – taking a few beats to flesh out characters such as the parents of the boys, local farmers and the frustrated SEALs. 

In order to do so, Howard also had to be a little ruthless with his 150 minutes — so there is no mention of Elon Musk’s contentious contributions to the rescue effort, and no time to find out much about any of the innumerous supporting volunteers. Instead, “Thirteen Lives” is a tense, taut drama, claustrophobically shot and scored. It’s perhaps impossible to accurately recreate the sheer terror that must have gripped the rescuers and rescued alike, but Howard goes some way towards acknowledging their magnificence.


Edinburgh Festival Fringe presents Yemeni play 

Edinburgh Festival Fringe presents Yemeni play 
Updated 07 August 2022

Edinburgh Festival Fringe presents Yemeni play 

Edinburgh Festival Fringe presents Yemeni play 

DUBAI: Scotland’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe this week presented a Yemeni play titled “Saber Came to Tea” to give visitors a taste of the Middle East. 

The short play, based on a true story, follows a young couple who stand against the constraining social norms of their families and risk their lives to be together. 

The play, which features musical and multimedia elements, is by award-winning Yemeni artist Shatha Altowai and her composer husband Saber Bamatraf. 

The couple worked with Palestinian poet Ghazi Hussein and writer and director Robert Rae on the narrative.

Edinburgh Festival Fringe kicked off on Aug. 5 and will run until Aug. 29. 

This year’s event returned in full capacity after it was canceled in 2020 and was reduced in size in 2021.