What We Are Reading Today: An Immense World

What We Are Reading Today: An Immense World
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Updated 29 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: An Immense World

What We Are Reading Today: An Immense World

Author: Ed Yong

In An Immense World, author and acclaimed science journalist Ed Yong coaxes us beyond the confines of our own senses, allowing us to perceive the skeins of scent, waves of electromagnetism, and pulses of pressure that surround us. Because in order to understand our world we don’t need to travel to other places; we need to see through other eyes.

In the book, we encounter beetles that are drawn to fires, turtles that can track the Earth’s magnetic fields, fish that fill rivers with electrical messages, and humans that wield sonar like bats.

We also get to listen to stories of pivotal discoveries in the field, while looking ahead at the many mysteries which lie unsolved.


What We Are Reading Today: Raising Lazarus

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Updated 1 min 15 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Raising Lazarus

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Author: Beth Macy

Raising Lazarus is a powerful book about the opioid crisis in America and how the drug companies continue to remain silent on the subject.
It is well-written and thoroughly researched.
Author Beth Macy has reported on the opiate epidemic through her successful book (which was made into a mini-series) Dopesick.
In this volume, she reports on the harm reduction community and the people trying to make a difference in the lives of addicted people on the street and marginalized communities.
This book provides a very enlightening insight into the immense resources needed to begin to tackle the epidemic.
Raising Lazarus follows the people with boots on the ground in the opioid crisis — the volunteers, advocates, families, and survivors fighting to save lives and heal broken and battered communities.
Macy digs deep into their struggles and reveals the terrible toll of the epidemic with a caring and compassionate lens.
She also weaves the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic into her analysis of what can only be described as a destructive tsunami of overdose deaths and injuries.

 


What We Are Reading Today: The Whole Truth

What We Are Reading Today: The Whole Truth
Updated 13 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: The Whole Truth

What We Are Reading Today: The Whole Truth

Author: P. J. E. Peebles

A century ago, thoughtful people questioned how reality could agree with physical theories that keep changing, from a mechanical model of the ether to electric and magnetic fields, and from homogeneous matter to electrons and atoms. Today, concepts like dark matter and dark energy further complicate and enrich the search for objective reality. The Whole Truth is a personal reflection on this ongoing quest by one of the world’s most esteemed cosmologists.
What lies at the heart of physical science? What are the foundational ideas that inform and guide the enterprise? Is the concept of objective reality meaningful? If so, do our established physical theories usefully approximate it? P. J. E. Peebles takes on these and other big questions about the nature of science, drawing on a lifetime of experience as a leading physicist and using cosmology as an example. He traces the history of thought about the nature of physical science since Einstein, and succinctly lays out the fundamental working assumptions.

 

 


What We Are Reading Today: Salmon Wars

What We Are Reading Today: Salmon Wars
Updated 12 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Salmon Wars

What We Are Reading Today: Salmon Wars

Authors: Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins

In Salmon Wars, investigative journalists Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins bring readers to massive ocean feedlots where millions of salmon are crammed into parasite-plagued cages and fed a chemical-laced diet.
The authors reveal the conditions inside hatcheries, and at the farms that threaten our fragile coasts. They draw colorful portraits of characters, such as the big salmon farmer who poisoned his own backyard and the American researcher driven out of Norway for raising the alarm about dangerous contaminants in the fish.
Frantz and Collins document how the industrialization of salmon threatens this keystone species, and they show how it doesn’t need to be this way.


What We Are Reading Today: Birds and Us

What We Are Reading Today: Birds and Us
Updated 10 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Birds and Us

What We Are Reading Today: Birds and Us

Author: Tim Birkhead

Since the dawn of human history, birds have stirred our imagination, inspiring and challenging our ideas about science, faith, art, and philosophy. We have worshipped birds, hunted them for sustenance, adorned ourselves with their feathers, studied their wings to engineer flight, and, more recently, attempted to protect them.

In Birds and Us, award-winning writer and ornithologist Tim Birkhead takes us on a dazzling epic journey through our mutual history with birds, from the ibises mummified and deified by ancient Egyptians to the Renaissance fascination with woodpecker anatomy—and from the Victorian obsession with egg collecting to today’s fight to save endangered species and restore their habitats.

Spanning continents and millennia, Birds and Us chronicles the beginnings of a written history of birds in ancient Greece and Rome, the obsession with falconry in the Middle Ages, and the development of ornithological science.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Unsettled Land

What We Are Reading Today: Unsettled Land
Updated 09 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Unsettled Land

What We Are Reading Today: Unsettled Land

Author: Sam W. Haynes

“Unsettled Land” by Sam W. Haynes has long been cast as an epic episode in the origins of the American West.

As the story goes, larger-than-life figures like Sam Houston, David Crockett, and William Barret Travis fought to free Texas from repressive Mexican rule.

Unsettled Land reveals the reality beneath this powerful creation myth. Haynes shows how the lives of ordinary people — white Americans, Mexicans, Native Americans, and those of African descent — were upended by extraordinary events over twenty-five years.

After the battle of San Jacinto, racial lines snapped taut as the Lone Star state sought to expel Indians, marginalize Mexicans, and tighten its grip on the enslaved.