What We Are Doing Today: Flower LEGO Bouquet

Photos by Jasmine Bager
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Photos by Jasmine Bager
What We Are Doing Today: Flower LEGO Bouquet
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Photos by Jasmine Bager
What We Are Doing Today: Flower LEGO Bouquet
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Photos by Jasmine Bager
What We Are Doing Today: Flower LEGO Bouquet
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Photos by Jasmine Bager
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Updated 14 August 2022

What We Are Doing Today: Flower LEGO Bouquet

Photos by Jasmine Bager
  • This booklet mentions the story of how the Flower Bouquet came to be: American designer Anderson Grubb used to visit his grandmother’s blossom-filled garden in West Virginia as a child

Get yourself a bouquet of flowers that you never have to water and that will never wilt. Today, we are arranging our very own bouquet with LEGO bricks from the Botanical Collection.

Made from plant-based plastic, this kit was created from sustainably-sourced sugarcane and elements from nature, including trees, leaves and bushes.

You can feel good about making an eco-friendly bouquet that will live in your home forever and that is mindful of the environment. Add them into your favorite vase and these can make for a vibrant statement piece for your office or living room. They also make for great gifts, bringing flowers to friends and family without the worry of watering and maintenance.

Putting together your very own bouquet doesn’t take much skill — only patience and perhaps short nails (long acrylic nails will probably get in the way). The Internet is full of video tutorials for the kit if you prefer to watch someone put it together before you start. The kit comes with 756 pieces in individually-sealed bags with numbers printed at the front. Each flower has illustrated instructions in the booklet that it comes with.

This booklet mentions the story of how the Flower Bouquet came to be: American designer Anderson Grubb used to visit his grandmother’s blossom-filled garden in West Virginia as a child and spent hours reflecting on which flowers might one day translate into a LEGO shape.

Fast-forward to when he became a designer at LEGO, he collaborated with Denmark-based designer, Astrid Sundorf Christensen, and together they finalized the set. In this kit, you can make three cream-colored roses, two pink snapdragons, one lavender-colored lavender, one purple-hued aster, two white with yellow common daisies and one orange California Poppy.

You can choose which flower to begin with and do it at your own pace without getting your hands dirty.

Initially created to help LEGO employees play in a garden of their imagination to assist them into getting back on track after what the booklet calls “a physical or psychological setback,” this set can help any adult or disciplined child pass the time and de-stress.

The box suggests that it is suitable for adults, with it retailing for around SR299 ($79). It is available at LEGO stores throughout the Kingdom. For more information, visit @LegoMiddleEast.

 


1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez

1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez
Updated 07 February 2023

1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez

1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez

DUBAI: Qatar-based ready-to-wear label 1309 Studios, founded by entrepreneur Ghada Al-Subaey, has been garnering the attention of international stars, including Argentinian model Georgina Rodriguez.

The star, who now lives in Saudi Arabia with her boyfriend Portuguese football player Cristiano Ronaldo, wore one of Al-Subaey’s abayas during the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Doha.

Al-Subaey told Arab News that one of her brand’s key goals was to modernize the traditional abaya and “make it accessible to every woman around the world.

“Having Georgina walk into a boutique and pick our abaya off the rack and wear it for such an important event means that we have managed to reach that goal in making the abaya versatile and wearable. She picked one of our signature abayas the palm sage green,” she said.

Rodriguez wore the design with a figure-hugging black dress, silver heels, and a white Chanel bag.

1309 Studios is grounded in a contemporary bohemian aesthetic. At the heart of the brand is a minimalist, feminine look that merges seasonal trends with traditional Qatari elements.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 1. (Supplied)

Clean silhouettes, bold colors, artful prints, and carefully considered details are hallmarks of the brand. The designer draws inspiration from art, nature, and global culture to create pieces with a contemporary edge.

“When I was a teenager, I found myself exploring fabrics and creating styles that weren’t available in Qatar at the time. I began designing kaftans for family and friends during college and that’s where it all started,” Al-Subaey added.

Before she launched her brand in 2015, she ran her small business from home and relied on word of mouth to increase the hype around her designs.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 2. (Supplied)

She said: “That was when I conceptualized and worked on launching my own brand. I saw that there was a gap, there was a need to create a community in Qatar where women can turn to take care of their emotional wellbeing and leave no stone unturned to make it into a reality.”

The brand name 1309 is a nod to Al-Subaey’s mother.

“13/09 is my mother’s birthday. The name is dedicated to my mother, as I got my fashion sense from her. I used to watch her stitch and cut when I was younger, I learned all about fabrics and stitching from my mother,” she added.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 3. (Supplied)

Al-Subaey’s designs, which are shipped worldwide and are available in stores in Saudi Arabia, Dubai, and Qatar, are tailored in Qatar. She uses sustainable, natural, and vegan fabrics, as well as biodegradable packaging.

She said: “We also recycle scrap fabric and turn it into furniture. We rely on human skills and avoid the use of machinery as much as possible.”

And her designs are not just sketches that she brings to life, she puts thought into the design process to understand how the pieces she is creating will emotionally affect the person wearing it.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 4. (Supplied)

“I want people to feel relaxed and most like themselves while wearing a 1309 piece of clothing. A lot of times when people are not comfortable in their clothes, they are not themselves.

“The idea behind the 1309 studio woman is to create a safe place for women. A place where women come together to empower and uplift each other professionally and otherwise; to develop a platform where women feel free to speak up and support and take a moment to heal from the daily challenges of life in today’s fast-paced technological world.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 5. (Supplied)

“The clothes they wear should not be a restraint. The fabrics, colors, and cuts that I choose make the girls feel fun and alive. It should feel like an outfit, rather than a covering for an outfit.

“The fabric we use at 1309 is meant to complement various body types and shapes,” she added.

Al-Subaey is working to grow her brand globally.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 6. (Supplied)

She said: “I want to change this stigma around abayas. I want abayas to become as respected globally as kimonos and to see everyone around the world wearing them; not necessarily to cover the body, but instead as a fashion statement.

“I would love for my ideas and inspiration to create change. Whether it is about applying sustainable approaches in our work or utilizing environmentally friendly packaging, I want the brand to continue to make a positive impact toward the community.

“I would like to expand globally and represent the Arab world in a global fashion space,” she added.


Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  

Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  
Updated 07 February 2023

Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  

Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  

DUBAI: Somali Canadian model Ubah Hassan took to Instagram on Tuesday morning to show off her head-turning gown from an event that took place in New York.  

The TV star, who is set to star in season 14 of “The Real Housewives of New York,” posted a video of her form-fitting lilac dress with cut out detailing around the chest that she wore to the 15 Percent Pledge gala. The gown featured voluminous sleeves that were attached to a cape with a long train.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by UBAH (@ubah)

Her dress was custom made by Harbison Studio, which was founded by New York-based designer Chales Elliot Harbison. 

“Warning to my future wedding guests: We are having rice and beans on my wedding as the entire wedding budget will go into dress and the diamonds,” Hassan joked in the second of two  Instagram posts. 

“Here is me and my team manifesting to be in a Disney princess movie,” she added, referencing her fairy-tale gown.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by UBAH (@ubah)

“THANK YOU for having us at @15percentpledge gala. You guys are doing amazing work supporting black business, black designers (sic),” she captioned her first post.  

The 15 Percent Pledge is an American non-profit organization that encourages retailers to pledge at least 15 percent of their shelf-space to Black-owned businesses. The foundation conducts audits, shares its database of Black-owned businesses, and offers business development strategies to participating companies. 

Dutch Moroccan Egyptian model Imaan Hammam was also in attendance. She wore a black gown with a long train by Italian brand Maximilian and had her hair tied in hip-grazing braids.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Imaan Hammam (@imaanhammam)

“Thank you @aurorajames and the entire @15percentpledge team for such a well-curated event and for bringing everyone together for such a great cause,” she wrote on Instagram.  

The gala dinner was also attended by Ashley Graham, Lori Harvey, Ryan Destiny and more.  

To celebrate the achievements of Black entrepreneurs, the Fifteen Percent Pledge awarded three founders with grants. The first-place winner, beauty brand 54 Thrones, received the first-ever Achievement Award, a $200,000 grant presented by Shop with Google. The second runner-up, Sergio Hudson, received $35,000, and the third runner-up, Puzzles of Color, received $20,000.  

The winners all received a physical award created by designer Jameel Mohammed, founder and director of Khiry, the luxury brand best known for its afro-futurist jewelry. 


US actress Megan Fox stuns in Lebanese label at Grammys 2023

US actress Megan Fox stuns in Lebanese label at Grammys 2023
Updated 06 February 2023

US actress Megan Fox stuns in Lebanese label at Grammys 2023

US actress Megan Fox stuns in Lebanese label at Grammys 2023
  • Beyonce broke the record for the most Grammy wins of any artist, scoring her 32nd prize ever

DUBAI: US actress Megan Fox opted for an elegant white gown from Lebanese couturier Zuhair Murad as she supported her musician-fiance Machine Gun Kelly (MGK)  at the 2023 Grammy Awards on Sunday night.

The couple, who were going for a “Romeo & Juliet” look wore complimentary outfits in matching metallics, with Fox opting for a more toned-down look to shine light on her partner.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Maeve Reilly (@stylememaeve)

Fox’s stylist took to Instagram to share the story behind her look. “Story time, when Adam shared the sketch of MGK’s look, I immediately thought of Baz Luhrmann’s ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ I wanted to find a simple classic white gown for Megan but still something that felt like her with a bit of an edge.

“I knew this was the dress the second I saw it and begged them to ship it in from Paris for me. It was exactly what she wanted and was the only thing she tried on. Tonight was his night so we really wanted to keep her look simple and classic so he could shine,” posted Maeve Reilly on Instagram.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Megan Fox (@meganfox)

The "Transformers" actress, 32, added to the glam with a custom 14K carat white gold and diamond nail set by Marrow Fine Jewelry and Nails and jewelry from designer Lorraine Schwartz.

This year, MGK was up for best rock album for “Mainstream Sellout,” but ahead of the ceremony, the win went to Ozzy Osbourne's “Patient Number 9.”

Meanwhile, superstar Beyonce broke the record for the most Grammy wins of any artist, scoring her 32nd prize ever and fourth of the night to resounding applause.

She won the title by winning the Grammy for Best Dance/Electronic Music Album for her smash “Renaissance,” surpassing the late classical conductor Georg Solti, who had 31 awards.

“I’m trying not to be too emotional,” the singer-songwriter said as her husband Jay-Z stood and applauded her. The singer thanked her late uncle, her parents, Jay-Z and her children for supporting her. “I’m just trying to receive this night. I want to thank God for protecting me. Thank you, God.”

Former One Direction member Harry Styles won the award for Best Pop Vocal Album for “Harry's House.” The singer said recording the song was one of the “greatest experiences of my life. It’s been my greatest joy.”

Also, notably, actress Viola Davis emerged from Sunday's show an EGOT — a term for those who have won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony — after her win for best audio book, narration and storytelling recording.


US actress Tessa Brooks shows off Saudi label Eman Alajlan in Los Angeles  

US actress Tessa Brooks shows off Saudi label Eman Alajlan in Los Angeles  
Updated 05 February 2023

US actress Tessa Brooks shows off Saudi label Eman Alajlan in Los Angeles  

US actress Tessa Brooks shows off Saudi label Eman Alajlan in Los Angeles  

DUBAI: US actress, social media star and dancer Tessa Brooks showed off a sleek look by Saudi designer Eman Alajlan at the 2023 MusiCares Persons of the Year event in Los Angeles over the weekend.  

US actress and social media star Tessa Brooks showed off a sleek look by Saudi designer Eman Alajlan. (Getty Images)

The 23-year-old multi-hyphenate showed off an all-black ensemble by Alajlan at an event that honored retired American record executive Berry Gordy and legendary Motown singer Smokey Robinson at the Los Angeles Convention Center. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Check the Tag (@checkthetag)

The pair of creatives are the architects behind a generation of soul-pop hits and they stood side-by-side on Friday night to accept a double-billed MusiCares Persons of the Year honor. MusiCares is non-profit wing of the Recording Academy and holds the annual gala ahead of the Grammy Awards, which took place on Sunday night.  

Brooks opted to show off a Saudi design on a red carpet that welcomed the who’s who of the entertainment industry — performers who took to the the stage at the event included Brandi Carlile, Jimmie Allen, PJ Morton, Trombone Shorty, John Legend, Sheryl Crow, Mumford & Sons, Isley Brothers, Michael McDonald, The Temptations, Rita Wilson and The Four Tops, Molly Tuttle and more.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by MusiCares (@musicares)

Musical icons Stevie Wonder and Lionel Richie also made on-stage appearances.  

Brooks chose a sculptured look by Alajlan, featuring a form-fitting bodice and skirt topped with a wrap-around collar dusted with gemstones.  

The social media star showed off her outfit of choice to her 19 million Instagram followers by way of a set of Instagram Stories.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tessa Brooks (@tessabrooks)

The model and actress also recently posted about her visits to Saudi Arabia, where she attended the Red Sea International Film Festival in December before jetting back to the Kingdom to visit the historical site of AlUla in January.  

“Sunrise in AlUla,” she captioned a carousel of shots on Instagram in which she can be seen basking in the Saudi sun wearing a toweled robe.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Tessa Brooks (@tessabrooks)

Alajlan, who has a store in Riyadh, established her label in 2007 and specializes in couture, bridal and pret-a-porter dresses. She has dressed a number of regional celebrities for international events, including the 2019 Venice Film Festival when Saudi actresses Mila Alzahrani and Dae Al-Hilali hit the red carpet in her creations. 


Tunisian managing director Nadia Dhouib pays tribute to Paco Rabanne

Tunisian managing director Nadia Dhouib pays tribute to Paco Rabanne
Updated 04 February 2023

Tunisian managing director Nadia Dhouib pays tribute to Paco Rabanne

Tunisian managing director Nadia Dhouib pays tribute to Paco Rabanne
  • The eponymous label he exited more than two decades ago hailed him as "among the most seminal fashion figures of the 20th century"
  • Tunisian managing director of Paco Rabanne, Nadia Dhouib, paid tribute to the ‘legendary’ fashion designer

PARIS: Tunisian managing director Nadia Dhouib this week paid tribute to the Spanish-born designer Paco Rabanne, who died at the age of 88 on Friday.

Dhouib, who was named managing director of Paco Rabanne in March last year, shared a black and white picture of the fashion designer, best known for his metallic ensembles and space-age designs of the 1960s, on her Instagram stories, and wrote: “Legend.”

The eponymous label he exited more than two decades ago hailed him as “among the most seminal fashion figures of the 20th century.”

Rabanne dressed some of the most prominent stars of the 1960s, including French singer Francoise Hardy, whose outfits from the designer included a minidress made from gold plates and a metal link jumpsuit, as well as Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg, who were pictured in matching silver outfits.

Among his most famous looks were the fitted, skin-baring ensembles worn by Jane Fonda in Roger Vadim’s cult science fiction film “Barbarella.”

The death of Francisco Rabaneda y Cuervo, Paco Rabanne’s birth name, was confirmed by a spokesperson for Spanish group Puig, which now controls the fashion house.

“A major personality in fashion, his was a daring, revolutionary and provocative vision, conveyed through a unique aesthetic,” said Marc Puig, chairman and CEO of Puig.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Paco Rabanne (@pacorabanne)

“Paco Rabanne made transgression magnetic. Who else could induce fashionable Parisian women (to) clamor for dresses made of plastic and metal? Who but Paco Rabanne could imagine a fragrance called Calandre — the word means ‘automobile grill,’ you know — and turn it into an icon of modern femininity?" the group's statement said.

Born in a village in the Spanish Basque region in 1934, his mother was a head seamstress at Balenciaga. He died in Portsall in Brittany.

Rabanne grew up in France, where the family moved after Spanish troops shot dead his father, who had been a Republican commander during the civil war.

He studied architecture at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. He started his career sketching handbags for a supplier to prestigious fashion houses including Givenchy and Chanel, as well as shoes for Charles Jourdan.

He then branched into fashion, designing garments and jewelry with unconventional materials such as metal and plastic.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Nadia Dhouib (@nadia_dhouib)

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His first collection, which he described as “unwearable dresses made of contemporary materials” were pieces made of strips of plastic linked with metal rings, worn by barefoot models at a presentation at the upscale Paris hotel George V.

The Paris cabaret Crazy Horse Saloon was his next venue, where models paraded his skimpy dresses and bathing suits while wearing hardhats.

While his innovation and futuristic designs won plaudits, his fascination with the supernatural prompted public derision at times. He was known for recounting past reincarnations, and in 1999, he predicted the space station Mir would crash into France, coinciding with a solar eclipse.

Surrealist Salvador Dali famously approved of his compatriot, calling him “Spain’s second genius.”

The designer teamed up with Spain’s Puig family in the late 1960s, launching perfumes that served as a springboard for the company’s international expansion.

“Paco Rabanne made transgression magnetic. Who else could induce fashionable Parisian women (to) clamour for dresses made of plastic and metal,” said Jose Manuel Albesa, president of Puig’s beauty and fashion division.

The label has seen a resurgence in popularity in recent years, under the creative direction of Julien Dossena, who has updated the house’s signature chainmail designs.

“We are grateful to Monsieur Rabanne for establishing our avant-garde heritage and defining a future of limitless possibilities,” the fashion house said in a statement.

The designer’s work with metallic plastic gave a “sharp edge” to women’s clothes, an effect that was “so much more than a New Look,” fashion historian Suzy Menkes said on Instagram Friday.

“It was rather a revolutionary attitude for women who wanted both to protect and assert themselves.”

(With Reuters and AP)