Iran protests are hot topic for Coldplay, Golshifteh Farahani at concert in Buenos Aires

The song was written by Shervin Hajipour based on tweets from Iranians expressing their outrage at their government’s actions following the death of Mahsa Amini in the custody of morality police in September. (AFP/File)
The song was written by Shervin Hajipour based on tweets from Iranians expressing their outrage at their government’s actions following the death of Mahsa Amini in the custody of morality police in September. (AFP/File)
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Updated 31 October 2022
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Iran protests are hot topic for Coldplay, Golshifteh Farahani at concert in Buenos Aires

Iran protests are hot topic for Coldplay, Golshifteh Farahani at concert in Buenos Aires
  • ‘We support all women and everybody fighting for freedom in Iran,’ says band frontman Chris Martin

LONDON: Coldplay showed their support for Iran’s cause during their concert in Buenos Aires on Sunday by playing “Baraye,” the anthem of the protest movement, alongside Iranian actor Golshifteh Farahani.

The British rock band performed the song in what was described by fans as an “emotional act” at their sold-out gig, which was broadcast live to more than 80 countries.

Farahani, who has been forced into exile since 2009 after her appearance in an American film sparked controversy in her home country, joined the band to sing the song in Farsi, the official language of Iran.

“We would like to do something to show that we support all the women and everybody fighting for freedom in Iran,” Martin said addressing the 72,000 crowd.

“Maybe you see on the news right now that there are so many places where people are not able to gather like this and be free to be themselves.

“Whether that is to listen to what they want to listen to, to wear what they want to wear, to think what they want to think, to love who they want to love, and particularly at the moment this is very clear in Iran.”

The song was written by Shervin Hajipour based on tweets from Iranians expressing their outrage at their government’s actions following the death of Mahsa Amini in the custody of morality police in September.

Hajipour uploaded the song on Sept. 27 and it amassed 40 million views before his arrest. Demonstrators picked up the chant and it quickly became a symbol of Iranian protest.

Martin added: “We decided that there’s a very beautiful and famous song now in Iran by a sweet guy called Shervin Hajipour. He has a song called ‘Baraye’ and we asked our friend Gol (Farahani) if she would come and sing this with us.

“Now, this song is in Farsi so I can’t really sing it, but we’re going to sing it together and we send this with love from Buenos Aires.”

Iran has endured more than 40 days of anti-government protests with demonstrations taking place in more than 80 cities across the country.

The uprising has taken place in the face of a government crackdown which has resulted in the deaths of more than 250 people.

Iranian expatriate communities and celebrities have shown their support through a number of gestures, including women cutting their hair and burning hijabs.

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