Saudi National Center for Wildlife, International Fund for Animal Welfare sign deal on wildlife protection

Saudi National Center for Wildlife, International Fund for Animal Welfare sign deal on wildlife protection
1 / 2
The Minister of Environment, Water and Agriculture Abdulrahman Al-Fadley in the middle, Mohammed Qurban, CEO of NCW right, and Azzedine Downes CEO of the International Fund for Animal Welfare left while signing the MoU in Riyadh. (NCW Twitter account)
Saudi National Center for Wildlife, International Fund for Animal Welfare sign deal on wildlife protection
2 / 2
An MoU was signed between the Kingdom’s National Center for Wildlife and the International Fund for Animal Welfare to counteract the growing threat toward wildlife.
Short Url
Updated 21 December 2022
Follow

Saudi National Center for Wildlife, International Fund for Animal Welfare sign deal on wildlife protection

Saudi National Center for Wildlife, International Fund for Animal Welfare sign deal on wildlife protection
  • Both parties to address challenges and repercussions on humans
  • The memorandum was signed by Mohammed Qurban, CEO of the national center, and Azzedine Downes, CEO of the international fund, in Riyadh

JEDDAH: A memorandum of understanding was signed on Wednesday between the Kingdom’s National Center for Wildlife and the International Fund for Animal Welfare to counteract the growing threat toward wildlife, create a formal framework for cooperation between the two sides, and achieve a number of common goals.
The memorandum was signed by Mohammed Qurban, CEO of the national center, and Azzedine Downes, CEO of the international fund, in Riyadh.
The center tweeted on its official Twitter account: “Under the patronage of the Minister of Environment, Water and Agriculture Abdulrahman Al-Fadley, the NCW signed an MoU with the IFAW @ifawMENA to cooperate in facing the challenges of wildlife and its repercussions on humans.”
The memorandum aims to address threats, and focuses on building safeguards to combat the illegal trade in wildlife, and reduce demand for it through changing behaviors related to the ownership of wild animals and keeping them as pets.
It also stresses support for rescue and rehabilitation operations, and the release of wild animals back to their natural habitats after treatment.
Downes said collaboration between key government stakeholders and international organizations is crucial if its aims are to become reality. He added that the fund is committed to improving the lives of animals.
Qurban said that the Kingdom is keen to update its legislation on wildlife protection in order to combat illegal activities and reduce the threat to wild animals.
He added that the center seeks to support staff by organizing courses and workshops to train small groups in how to combat violations against rulings affecting wildlife.
Qurban said that the center aims to recover illegally acquired wild species, first by taking the animals to shelters and then releasing them back into their natural environments.
He added that the Kingdom began this practice a long time ago by creating reserves to help protect animals and their habitats.
The center is leading the initiative of expanding protected areas to reach 30 percent of the Kingdom’s land and sea area, which is one of the Saudi Green Initiative pillars that will rehabilitate ecosystems and enrich biodiversity.