What We Are Reading: Slow Burn by Robert Jisung Park

What We Are Reading: Slow Burn by Robert Jisung Park
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Updated 19 June 2024
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What We Are Reading: Slow Burn by Robert Jisung Park

What We Are Reading: Slow Burn by Robert Jisung Park

It’s hard not to feel anxious about the problem of climate change, especially if we think of it as an impending planetary catastrophe.

In “Slow Burn,” R. Jisung Park encourages us to view climate change through a different lens: one that focuses less on the possibility of mass climate extinction in a theoretical future, and more on the everyday implications of climate change here and now. 

Park shows how climate change headlines often miss some of the most important costs. 


What We Are Reading Today: The Tech Coup

What We Are Reading Today: The Tech Coup
Updated 16 July 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: The Tech Coup

What We Are Reading Today: The Tech Coup

Author: Marietje Schaake

Over the past decades, under the cover of “innovation,” technology companies have successfully resisted regulation and have even begun to seize power from governments themselves. Facial recognition firms track citizens for police surveillance. Cryptocurrency has wiped out the personal savings of millions and threatens the stability of the global financial system. 

In “The Tech Coup,” Marietje Schaake offers a behind-the-scenes account of how technology companies crept into nearly every corner of our lives and our governments.


What We Are Reading Today: ‘Snakes of Australia’

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Updated 15 July 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: ‘Snakes of Australia’

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Authors: TIE EIPPER AND SCOTT EIPPER

With more than 1,000 photographs, Snakes of Australia illustrates and describes in detail all 240 of the continent’s species and subspecies—from file snakes, pythons, colubrids, and natricids to elapids, marine elapids, homalopsids, and blind snakes.

It features introductions to each family, species descriptions, type locations, distribution maps, and quick-identification keys to each family and genera.

 


What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Data Economy’

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Updated 14 July 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Data Economy’

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Authors: ISAAC BALEY AND LAURA VELDKAMP

The most valuable firms in the global economy are valued largely for their data. Amazon, Apple, Google, and others have proven the competitive advantage of a good data set.

And yet despite the growing importance of data as a strategic asset, modern economic theory neglects its role. In this book, Isaac Baley and Laura Veldkamp draw on a range of theoretical frameworks at the research frontier in macroeconomics and finance.

 


What We Are Reading Today: ‘Liquid Empire’

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Updated 13 July 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: ‘Liquid Empire’

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Author: COREY ROSS

In the 19th and 20th centuries, a handful of powerful European states controlled more than a third of the land surface of the planet.

These sprawling empires encompassed not only rainforests, deserts, and savannahs but also some of the world’s most magnificent rivers, lakes, marshes, and seas. “Liquid Empire” tells the story of how the waters of the colonial world shaped the history of imperialism, and how this imperial past still haunts us today.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Leon Battista Alberti: Writer and Humanist

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Updated 12 July 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: Leon Battista Alberti: Writer and Humanist

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  • McLaughlin begins with what we know of Alberti’s life, comparing the facts laid out in Alberti’s autobiography with the myth created in the 19th century by Burckhardt, before moving on to his extraordinarily wide knowledge of classical texts

Author: Martin McLaughlin

Leon Battista Alberti (1404–1472) was one of the most prolific and original writers of the Italian Renaissance—a fact often eclipsed by his more celebrated achievements as an art theorist and architect, and by Jacob Burckhardt’s mythologizing of Alberti as a “Renaissance or Universal Man.” In this book, Martin McLaughlin counters this partial perspective on Alberti, considering him more broadly as a writer dedicated to literature and humanism, a major protagonist and experimentalist in the literary scene of early Renaissance Italy. McLaughlin, a noted authority on Alberti, examines all of Alberti’s major works in Latin and the Italian vernacular and analyzes his vast knowledge of classical texts and culture.

McLaughlin begins with what we know of Alberti’s life, comparing the facts laid out in Alberti’s autobiography with the myth created in the 19th century by Burckhardt, before moving on to his extraordinarily wide knowledge of classical texts. He then turns to Alberti’s works, tracing his development as a writer through texts that range from an early comedy in Latin successfully passed off as the work of a fictitious ancient author to later philosophical dialogues written in the Italian vernacular (a revolutionary choice at the time).