2,000 Saudis to be trained as damaged car assessors

Updated 22 June 2016

2,000 Saudis to be trained as damaged car assessors

JEDDAH: The Saudi Authority for Accredited Valuers (Taqeem) intends to create around 2,000 jobs for Saudis as cost assessors of vehicles damaged in accidents, a local publication reported.

Sources said a British company would train the assessors, with the course to start in the last quarter of this year. Taqeem intends, with the national traffic department, to set up an electronic system, linked to six government and private agencies, to reduce the waiting period for clients.
Hani Al-Dahan, Taqeem’s deputy secretary-general, said the body has appointed Britain’s Thatcham Center, a nonprofit organization, to conduct training and research. “The center will prepare the training programs for the Saudi assessors and issue vocational certificates. The programs will be established on four levels starting from an associate member, member, first-rank member and then fellowship,” said Al-Dahan.
He said Taqeem intends to establish an academy for training assessors. “The first phase will start in two months’ time by sending six trainers to Britain to get their degrees at Thatcham Center. They will then return to run the course in the Kingdom,” he said.
He said the assessors would cut out car dealers who are now involved in assessing damages to vehicles caused by traffic accidents. This would reduce fraud and errors during the assessment process. These assessments would be binding on all parties, including car insurance companies which must pay for repairs.
“We expect the new system will reduce the financial waste, caused by poor or incorrect assessment, by more than 30 percent. Taqeem will impose fines of up to SR200,000 or prison of one year on any assessor who violates the charter and ethics of the profession,” he said.
He said the final phase of the project would result in an almost complete electronic processing of assessments, reducing the need for clients to turn up in person at the offices of insurance companies.
In addition, assessors must work weekends so that clients are not forced to wait until Sunday for their reports.
He said 2,000 trained Saudi assessors by the end of 2017 would cover the need of the Saudi market according to a study conducted by a specialized company. “By the end of this year the Saudi market will have around 30 assessors, as part of the first phase of the program,” he said.
During the trial phase of the project, Taqeem covered more than 4,500 traffic accidents in three months, said Al-Dahan. It found that 11 percent of beneficiaries received compensation from their insurance companies within one week, 22 percent within 2 weeks, and 22 percent within three weeks.


First plane with aid from Saudi Arabia arrives in Lebanon

Updated 42 min 43 sec ago

First plane with aid from Saudi Arabia arrives in Lebanon

RIYADH: The first plane with aid from Saudi Arabia arrived in Lebanon on Friday for victims of Beirut’s port explosion, the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Centre (KSrelief) said.

Two planes departed from King Khalid International Airport on Friday carrying more than 120 tons of medical supplies, tents, shelter kits and food for those affected by the blast. A specialized team from the center to follow up and supervise the distribution operations were also on board the planes.

The aid aims to help victims overcome the effects of the explosion, said Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, Advisor to the Royal Court and Supervisor General of KSrelief.

Al-Rabeeah stated that the directive of King Salman embodies the established humanitarian values of the Saudi leadership, stressing that this assistance highlights the pivotal role of Saudi Arabia in providing humanitarian assistance to all people in need around the world with complete impartiality.