Korea’s POSCO E&C negotiates $2.92bn Vision 2030 projects

Han Chan-Kun, president and CEO of POSCO E&C, and Cho Young Doo, vice CEO for strategic planning, address a press conference on Monday.
Updated 22 June 2016

Korea’s POSCO E&C negotiates $2.92bn Vision 2030 projects

RIYADH: POSCO E&C, a South Korean global construction leader, says it is negotiating projects related to Saudi Vision 2030 worth $2.92 billion.
Han Chan-Kun, president and CEO of POSCO E&C, announcing this here on Monday, highlighted Korean and his company's contributions in the implementation of Vision 2030.
Chan-Kun said his company has lined up many projects for the Kingdom to support its march to achieve Vision 2030, including 13 projects under planning, two under construction and two under negotiation.
"Under construction projects are the $421 million sulfur railcar roaring faculty owned by Saudi Aramco and the $79 million Yanbu wastewater treatment plant owned by Marafiq,” he said.
"The two projects under negotiations are the $2.00 billion Ghazlan power plant owned by Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) and construction of $918 million five-star hotel owned by Dar Al Hijrah," he added.
Chan-Kun, a prominent South Korean business leader, highly lauded Vision 2030 stating that it will transform the country to a new advanced level both regionally and globally, and will provide the Kingdom and its people more prosperity and better quality of life in the post-oil era.
"Korea will be a strong contributor to this transformation process with all that it has in terms of knowledge and expertise. Our company already has started this by working in some of the vision projects and it will work on more once we get more opportunities," he said.
He pointed out that his company entered into partnership with the Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF), which purchased 38 percent (around $ 1.1 billion) of his company and this partnership resulted in establishing PECSA, a new Saudi-Korean joint venture company that will be a major player in the fields of urban development, housing and infrastructure construction in the country.
He hoped that the new JV will place his company in a better position to offer the best possible projects in its specialties across the Kingdom.
"While partnerships with many others can be merely for draining profits from the country after completion of projects and nothing else, our partnership with PIF, hopefully will be mutually beneficial and will secure profitability and stability, and sustainability for the projects we implement, " Chan-Kun added.
"Also, the joint venture will benefit in technology transfers, job creation, improve Saudi and GCC engineers’ capabilities by interacting with their high level counterparts in POSCO E&C," he pointed out.
Chan-Kun said his company will provide many job opportunities for Saudis especially in the field of engineering and construction. He expressed his admiration for the Saudi students currently studying in South Korea and said with hard work and devotion they are assured of taking their right places in many fields during the implementation of Vision 2030 when they return home.
He pointed out that his company, ranked third in Korea and 39th globally in the field of engineering and construction. It is part of the Korean and global giant, POSCO Group, that has six major business affiliates in the fields of steel, engineering, trade, IT, energy, and chemistry, and comprises 41 subsidiaries in these fields.
Cho Young Doo, vice CEO for strategic planning, also addressed the media shedding light on POSCO E&C's strategic approach in delivering Vision 2030.
He said his company's strategic approach will focus on three elements. First, the strategic relationship between Korea and the Kingdom that goes back to 1960's as well as the strategic partnership and expertise of the three concerned parties — Saudi PIF, POSCO Group, and POSCO E&C.
The second is provision of total solution from the accumulative know-how and urban development expertise his company has acquired from many past mega projects' execution.
The third is job creation and improving the capabilities of Saudi engineers and work force in construction specialties.


Trump advisers urge delisting of US-listed Chinese companies that fail to meet audit standards

Updated 51 min 41 sec ago

Trump advisers urge delisting of US-listed Chinese companies that fail to meet audit standards

  • Growing pressure to crack down on Chinese companies that avail themselves of US capital markets but do not comply with rules
WASHINGTON: Trump administration officials have urged the president to delist Chinese companies that trade on US exchanges and fail to meet US auditing requirements by January 2022, Securities and Exchange Commission and Treasury officials said on Thursday.
The remarks came after President Donald Trump tasked a group of key advisers, including Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and SEC Chairman Jay Clayton, with drafting a report with recommendations to protect US investors from Chinese companies whose audit documents have long been kept from US regulators.
It also comes amid growing pressure from Congress to crack down on Chinese companies that avail themselves of US capital markets but do not comply with US rules faced by American rivals.
“We are simply leveling the playing field, holding Chinese firms listed in the US to the same standards as everyone else,” a Treasury official told reporters in a briefing call about the report.
The US Senate unanimously passed legislation in May that could prevent some Chinese companies from listing their shares on US exchanges unless they follow standards for US audits and regulations.
Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen, who sponsored the bill described the recommendations as “an important first step,” but said that “without the added teeth of our bill, this report alone does not implement the requirements necessary to protect everyday American investors.”
The administration’s recommendations, if implemented via an SEC rulemaking process, would give Chinese companies already listed in the United States until Jan. 1, 2022, to ensure the US auditing watchdog, known as the PCAOB, has access to their audit documents.
They can also provide a “co-audit,” for example, performed by a US parent company of the China-based affiliate tasked with auditing the Chinese firm. However, companies seeking to list in the United States for the first time will need to comply immediately, the officials said.
A State Department official told Reuters the administration plans soon to scrap a 2013 agreement between US and Chinese auditing authorities to set up a process for the PCAOB to seek documents in enforcement cases against Chinese auditors.
China said on Friday that the two countries have “good cooperation” in monitoring publicly listed firms.
“The current situation is that some US monitoring authorities are failing to comply with their obligations, and what they are doing is political manipulation — they are trying to force Chinese companies to delist from US markets,” foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a media briefing.
The PCAOB has long complained of China’s failure to grant requests, giving it scant insight on audits of Chinese firms that trade on US exchanges.
The report also recommends requiring greater disclosure by issuers and registered funds of the risk of investing in China, as well as mandating more due diligence by funds that track indexes and issuing guidance to investment advisers about fiduciary obligations surrounding investments in China.
The moves come amid rising tensions between Washington and Beijing over China’s handling of the coronavirus and its moves to curb freedoms in Hong Kong, among other issues.