Turkey’s friends and foes

Harun Yahya
Updated 06 August 2016

Turkey’s friends and foes

TURKEY continues to feel the impact of the July 15 failed coup attempt. In the wake of that event, foreign sources are frequently asking two questions: What is currently happening in the Turkish army? And who are Turkey’s true allies in the East and the West?
Foreigners may find it difficult to understand the answer to the question regarding the army. In the Turkish army, members of the Gulen movement managed to achieve high ranks and eventually used this power to mercilessly slaughter their own people. It is really terrifying that an organization, which hates its own countrymen, manages to obtain positions of authority in the armed forces.
In Turkey, declaring a state of emergency was deemed as necessary after the coup attempt. The president and the prime minister, right after the declaration of the state of emergency, clarified that people’s freedoms would not be restricted and nobody would be victimized. The government, undoubtedly, lived up to its words. The state of emergency was declared in order for the government to swiftly issue executive orders and to allow for a quick and effective capture of members of the organization behind the coup attempt. As a result of these decisions, the office of commander-in-chief will be under presidential control, and Service Commands will come under the purview of the defense ministry. Military schools and war colleges will be shut down, and instead National Defense universities will be established. Military courts will work under the Justice Department, and military hospitals under the Health Department.
Throughout the history of modern-day Turkish, coup attempts have always posed threats to democracy. The country’s overall progress was badly affected by these military coups. Therefore, many of the changes in the armed forces are supported by nearly everyone in Turkey so as to prevent any future attempt to change the course of the country. However, this should be stated: People of Turkey love their armed forces, the second biggest army of NATO, for their heroism, bravery and sacrifices. It is not possible for a few traitors to smear this valuable institution.
It is also possible to seek an answer for the second question in the light of these events in Turkey. Sincerity of many countries, which are allies of Turkey, has come under scrutiny in the wake of the coup attempt. Many so-called allies openly defended coup supporters and criticized the Turkish government without even issuing a formal statement of condemnation.
During and after the June 15 coup attempt, many of the “Turkey's ally” in the West obviously did not pass the test. At a time when the people of Turkey stood united in support of an elected government, the European Union criticized Turkey and ignored people’s will and aspirations. This approach has disappointed the entire nation. However, we have news for those who act as democrats in Europe but do not shy away from supporting coup plotters: Turkish people firmly stood against coup supporters. They can never be tricked.
In the light of these developments, President Erdogan’s visit to Russia on Aug. 9 is worthy of attention. This is the first high-profile visit after the plane crisis that had erupted between Turkey and Russia. We would like to remind that during the coup attempt, even while the attempt was in progress, Russia was the only country that had condemned the coup attempt. The fact that this condemnation came before the coup was crushed, unlike our many “allies” who intently waited until it ended.
As we have always stated, Turkey should have good relations with the entire world. After the terrifying experiences we endured, this necessity manifested itself once again. It is quite joyful for both Turkish government and Turkish people that our relationship with our old friend Russia is improving. As for Europe: The latest developments will not create any friction between Turkey and Europe; however, seeing the real stance of a big part of Europe will no doubt make the Turkish government and people more cautious. In our opinion, it is beneficial for Europe to make up with its valuable Middle Eastern ally as soon as possible. Turkish people are not vindictive; but they never forget disloyalty. And they never hesitate to risk their own well-being to help their allies.

n The writer has authored more than 300 books translated into 73 languages on politics, religion and science. He tweets @harun_yahya.


Turkish shelling kills 9 regime personnel in NW Syria: monitor

Updated 25 February 2020

Turkish shelling kills 9 regime personnel in NW Syria: monitor

  • UN says it was trying to double aid deliveries across a border crossing from Turkey from 50 to 100 trucks a day.
  • Idlib has seen hundreds of thousands of people flee the violence

BEIRUT: Turkish shelling Monday killed nine regime fighters in northwest Syria, where Ankara-backed rebels are fighting off advancing regime forces, a monitor said.
Syrian regime forces have since December clawed back parts of the last major opposition bastion of Idlib in violence that has displaced almost a million people.
Fighting raged on Monday, killing almost 100 fighters on both sides around the jihadist-dominated bastion, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitor said.
Those included 41 pro-regime fighters, as well as 53 jihadists and allied rebels.
Overall on Monday, the regime advanced rapidly in the south of the bastion, but lost the town of Nayrab along the M4 highway to Turkish-backed rebels in the southeast.
Turkish shelling in that area killed four regime fighters near Nayrab and another five near the town of Saraqeb to its east, the Britain-based Observatory said.
Opposition fighters had already broken back into Nayrab last week after the regime seized it at the start of the month, but then lost it again several hours later.
Saraqeb, which lies at the intersection of the M4 and another important highway the M5, has been under regime control since February 8.
Earlier Monday, Russian air strikes killed five civilians in the Jabal Al-Zawiya area in the south of the bastion, the Observatory said.
In fighting on the ground, regime forces seized 10 towns and villages south of the M4, which links the coastal regime stronghold of Latakia to government-held second city Aleppo, it said.
State news agency SANA, for its part, said “units of the Syrian army continued to progress in the south of Idlib” province.
Observatory chief Rami Abdel Rahman said the regime’s aim was to wrest back control of stretches of the M4 still under the control of jihadists and allied rebels.
That would require operations against the towns of Ariha and Jisr Al-Shughur, both along the M4.
Analysts expect a tough battle for Jisr Al-Shughur, held by the jihadist Turkistan Islamic Party whose fighters mainly hail from China’s Uighur Muslim minority.
They are allied to Hayat Tahrir Al-Sham, a group led by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate which dominates the Idlib region.
Loyalist forces have already taken back control of the M5, which connects the capital with Aleppo.
They have also secured the region around the northern city, a major pre-war industrial hub.
Fighting in northwest Syria since December has forced some 900,000 people to flee their homes and shelters amid bitter cold.
The United Nations said Monday that the latest fighting was coming “dangerously close” to encampments of the displaced, risking an imminent “bloodbath.”
Mark Cutts, a UN humanitarian coordinator, also told reporters in Geneva that the world body was trying to double aid deliveries across a border crossing with Turkey from 50 to 100 trucks a day.
Syria’s war has killed more than 380,000 people and displaced millions since starting in 2011 with the brutal repression of anti-government protests.