’A Star is Born’ again with Cooper, Gaga

Lady Gaga
Updated 17 August 2016

’A Star is Born’ again with Cooper, Gaga

LOS ANGELES: Pop singer Lady Gaga and Oscar-nominated actor Bradley Cooper are joining forces to remake classic Hollywood musical drama “A Star is Born,” Warner Bros said on Tuesday.
Cooper, 41, who has been nominated for four Oscars including acting and producing 2014’s “American Sniper,” will make his directorial debut on the movie, while Lady Gaga, 30, will make her feature film lead acting debut.
Warner Bros did not give a release date for the project.
“A Star is Born,” the story of an aspiring young starlet who arrives in Hollywood and is helped by an aging leading man, was first told on the big screen in 1937 with Janet Gaynor and Fredric March. It was remade with Judy Garland and James Mason in 1954 and with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson in 1976.
In the new film, Grammy-winning Lady Gaga will compose and perform new songs.
The singer made her television acting debut in FX’s “American Horror Story: Hotel,” playing the vampire Countess, which landed her a Golden Globe best actress in a limited series/TV movie award.


Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

Updated 04 June 2020

Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

  • US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic
  • Elective medical procedures resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery

MIAMI: Quarantined Florida residents worried about their laughter lines and crows’ feet need frown no longer — Botox is back, and it’s being offered at a drive-through.
On May 4, the US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic. That means certain elective medical procedures could resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery.
Michael Salzhauer, a plastic surgeon known as ‘Dr. Miami’ who has also starred in a reality television show, has been conducting drive-through Botox injections in the garage of his building in the posh Miami neighborhood of Bal Harbor.
Salzhauer said the idea struck him as he was sitting in his car waiting for a blood test for COVID-19 antibodies.
“The areas that we inject Botox are the upper face, exactly the parts of the face that aren’t covered by the mask so it’s really ideal,” Salzhauer said, while wearing a mask, face shield and surgical gown as he waited for his next drive-up patient.
Patients sign up online, paying an average of $600 each for a stippling of shots across their foreheads.
Arman Ohevshalom, 36, was enthusiastic as he waited in line with his wife in their car, although it was their first time receiving the injections.
“It’s very creative, and after seeing how they’re running it I feel just as comfortable as I would in the office,” he said.
Florida’s tattoo artists, however, are frustrated. Shuttered since March, they asking why they cannot open, too.
Botox injections are “kind of like tattooing, he’s injecting stuff into the skin,” said tattoo shop owner Chico Cortez. Florida is home to about 10,000 working tattoo artists, according to the Florida Professional Tattoo Artist Guild.
An emailed statement from a Miami-Dade County spokesperson said Mayor Carlos Gimenez has yet to set a date for reopening tattoo shops. “He is working with industry members and the medical experts to come up with the best way to reopen safely,” it said.