Universities hire part-time staff ‘to evade Saudization’

Universities hire part-time staff ‘to evade Saudization’
The norms are often ignored and part-time lecturers are met with impossible terms if they seek a permanent job. (SPA)
Updated 29 August 2016

Universities hire part-time staff ‘to evade Saudization’

Universities hire part-time staff ‘to evade Saudization’

TAIF: A number of universities have reportedly resorted to hiring part-time Saudi staff with higher degrees, using the pay-by-hour system to avoid permanent employment.
This practice was started after some Saudi universities were criticized for recruiting non-Saudi teachers and ignoring the nationalization plan, local media reported on Sunday.
An academic working for a university, said Saudis hired without a contract can be sacked any time, and have to work according to a schedule that has been prepared by the university. “He doesn’t have any idea about the financial reward, which is determined by the contractors; payments are sometimes delayed and paid at the end of the semester.”
He said that as a part-time professor, he is prevented from attending college and department meetings and he is provided with information through the foreign contractor.
“The norms are often ignored and part-time lecturers are met with impossible terms if they seek a permanent job. They are often convinced to continue working as part timers and threatened with dismissal at any time.”
He said that students know the lecturer is a part time staff, which means he is a third grade employee, and is often subjected to complaints as well as academic blackmail, such as increasing the grades of students and approving the use of books written by some faculty members to be taught to the students.
“Part-time lecturers have no right to ask for leave under any circumstances or any other benefits,” he added.


Saudi Arabia ranked safest among G20 nations, according to international indicators

Updated 02 December 2020

Saudi Arabia ranked safest among G20 nations, according to international indicators

Saudi Arabia ranked safest among G20 nations, according to international indicators
  • Results ranked Kingdom ahead of five permanent UNSC members — US, Russia, China, UK and France

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s progress has led to the Kingdom ranking first among G20 nations for safety, outperforming the five permanent members of the UN Security Council (UNSC), international safety indicators showed on Wednesday.

The results were revealed through five security indicators included in the Global Competitiveness Report 2019, and the Sustainable Development Goals Index 2020 (SDG Index 2020).

The SDG index ranked the Kingdom first among G20 nations, and ahead of the five permanent UNSC members — US, Russia, China, UK and France — in the percentage of population who feel safe walking alone at night. Saudi Arabia also performed better than Canada within the G20 countries.

Saudi Arabia also ranked first in the reliability of police services index; an indicator which measures public confidence in law enforcement and its success in achieving order and safety. The Kingdom topped the G20, and surpassed the five permanent UNSC members in this index as well.

The Kingdom also outperformed the five UNSC countries in an index measuring the effectiveness of combating organized crime, as stated by the Global Competitiveness Report 2019. Saudi Arabia came in second in the same index among G20 nations.

The Global Competitiveness Report issued by the World Economic Forum also showed that the Kingdom advanced three positions, now ranking 36 globally in international competitiveness.

The report pointed out the Kingdom’s energetic steps forward to diversify its economy, with expectations of growth in the non-oil sector. The report also discussed the emergence of more investments outside the mining industry within the public and private sectors in the next few years.

The report commended the Kingdom's strong determination to undertake structural reforms, its widespread adoption of communication technology, and its high potential for innovation, especially in terms of patent registration.