Saudi Arabia prime target of terrorists

Updated 22 September 2016

Saudi Arabia prime target of terrorists

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has been able to thwart more than 95% of terrorist operations according to a security strategy praised by the world.

Saudi Arabia is one of the first countries that paid attention to fighting terrorism at various levels, as it has carried out serious steps in the fight against this phenomenon locally, regionally, and internationally, and effectively contributed to fighting it in accordance with international regulations.
The Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques said in his speech during the opening of the World Islamic Conference on Combating Terrorism, which was held by the Muslim World League in Makkah last year, that the Islamic nation is threatened by terrorism’s murders and crimes which go beyond the borders of the Islamic world, and falsely raise the banner of Islam, which is completely innocent of such terrorism.
The 42nd meeting of the Council of Foreign Ministers of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation hosted by Kuwait in 2015, under the theme “Shared Vision on Promoting Tolerance and Renouncing Terrorism,” called for a commitment to the goals and principles of the organization, besides commitment to the recommendations of the World Islamic Conference which was held in Makkah.
The Kingdom has been the target of terrorist acts, where the number of attacks in the Kingdom reached 51 in only 37 years since 1979, immediately following the Iranian revolution. Until now, terrorist acts in the Kingdom have resulted in the death of more than 208 people and injuries to 1,127 people.
The strategy of fighting and combating terrorism in the Kingdom has been very clear, and it has been recognized by the world for such efforts. Saudi law enforcement agencies managed to destroy terror plots and their sources, and hunted them down regionally and internationally, besides listing organizations that are considered terrorist by the Kingdom. 
Crown Prince Mohammed bin Naif, minister of interior, himself escaped an assassination attempt by Al-Qaeda, and that shows that Saudi Arabia is targeted by terrorism which, unfortunately, cooperates politically with many countries to create chaos and instability in the region.


Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

Updated 15 September 2019

Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

  • The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen
  • ‘Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors’

BAGHDAD: Baghdad on Sunday denied any link to drone attacks on Saudi oil plants, after media speculation that the strikes were launched from Iraq despite being claimed by Yemeni rebels.
The attacks early Saturday targeted two key oil installations, causing massive fires and taking out half of the kingdom’s vast oil output.
The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war.
But the Wall Street Journal has reported that officials were investigating the possibility the attacks involved missiles launched from Iraq or Iran.
Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi on Sunday denied reports Iraqi territory “was used for drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities.”
“Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors,” he said in a statement.
“The Iraqi government will be extremely firm with whomever tries to violate the constitution.”
Iraq is home to several Iran-backed militias and paramilitary factions, placing it in an awkward situation amid rising tensions between its two main sponsors, Tehran and Washington.
United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo squarely accused Tehran of being behind Saturday’s operation, saying there was no evidence the “unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” was launched from Yemen.
Iraq has called for its territory to be spared any spillover in the standoff between the US and Iran, which has included a series of attacks on shipping in sensitive Gulf waters.
Recent raids on bases belonging to Iraqi Shiite paramilitary groups linked with Iran, attributed to Israel, sparked fears of an escalation.
There have been no military consequences so far, but the strikes have heightened divisions between pro-Tehran and pro-Washington factions in Iraq’s political class.
Baghdad has recently moved to repair ties with Saudi Arabia, a key US ally — much to Iran’s chagrin.
Riyadh recently announced a major border post on the Iraqi frontier would reopen mid-October, after being closed for almost three decades.