Sting sings ‘Inshallah’ on refugee crisis

Sting sings ‘Inshallah’ on refugee crisis
Sting
Updated 02 October 2016

Sting sings ‘Inshallah’ on refugee crisis

Sting sings ‘Inshallah’ on refugee crisis

NEW YORK: As Sting took up the refugee crisis for his latest album, he met in Berlin with musicians who fled Syria. The rock legend asked for their permission to record his song.
“I felt it was important to have that sanction,” Sting told AFP of the track “Inshallah,” in which he envisions himself on a boat like a refugee desperate for safety.
The song appears on Sting’s album “57th and 9th,” which comes out Nov. 11 and marks the most rock-driven work in years by the former Police frontman.
The long politically engaged artist and Amnesty International supporter, who turns 65 on Oct. 2, also reflects somberly on his own mortality on the album.
Sting asked the Syrians to share their stories and performed with them a version of “Inshallah” — which means “God willing” in Arabic — for the album’s deluxe edition.
“’Inshallah’ is a beautiful word from the Arabic language which is kind of resignation — it’s God’s will, it shall be — or it’s a word that describes some sort of hope, courage,” Sting said.
“I don’t know what the political solution is,” Sting said of the refugee crisis that brought more than one million asylum seekers to Europe’s shores last year alone.
“But I think if there is a solution, it has to be rooted in empathy — for the victims of the war that’s going on in Syria at the moment for example, the victims of poverty in Africa, and perhaps in the future the victims of global warming.”


TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps
Updated 18 January 2021

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps
  • Facebook-owned WhatsApp badly hit by a backlash after updating its privacy policy

DUBAI: Signal is more comfortable instant messaging service to use compared with other apps such as WhatsApp or Telegram, according to half of those who responded to an Arab News poll.

Signal’s surge in popularity among smartphone users, thanks to a two-word tweet from technology entrepreneur Elon Musk endorsing the encrypted messaging service, clearly showed as 50 percent of the 1,451 respondents expressed contentment with it.

Facebook-owned WhatsApp, badly hit by a backlash after updating its privacy policy, got a thumbs-up from three out of 10 poll respondents while Telegram had about a tenth of supporters. The remaining 10 percent of Arab New readers who responded to the poll meanwhile said none of the three instant messaging apps were comfortable to use.

 

 

Musk earlier urged users to “Use Signal” after WhatsApp, the most popular instant messaging app, was accused of forcing subscribers to share their personal data with its parent company Facebook for advertising.

Users had to accept these new terms before February 8, otherwise their accounts will be deleted. The ensuing furor prompted WhatsApp to delay its take it or leave it privacy update until May.

It likewise came out with a clarification the privacy changes were focused on how businesses used the app.

“We want to be clear that the policy update does not affect the privacy of your messages with friends or family in any way,” WhatsApp said in a statement.

“Instead, this update includes changes related to messaging a business on WhatsApp, which is optional, and provides further transparency about how we collect and use data.”