New Barbie doll honors ‘Selma’ director

Updated 08 December 2015

New Barbie doll honors ‘Selma’ director

LOS ANGELES: Though famously snubbed for Best Director at Oscar time, filmmaker Ava DuVernay and her otherwise Academy Award winning “Selma” made history last year. DuVernay wasn’t just the first African American woman to direct a movie nominated for Best Picture; she helmed what is arguably the highest-profile film about Martin Luther King Jr. to date.
But there is always another mountain to climb. DuVernay announced that a Barbie Doll made in her image will go on sale Monday — and, despite Barbie’s bad name among some concerned about how the dolls affect young girls, the director and her fans are psyched.
“Wild (plus) wonderful,” DuVernay tweeted.
“Am I too old to put this on my Santa list?” one Twitter user wondered.
DuVernay’s Barbie has been in the works for some time. The doll, part of Barbie’s “Sheroes” line, was announced this past spring.
“Barbie has always represented that girls have choices, and this Spring we are proud to honor six Sheroes who through their trade and philanthropic efforts are an inspiration to girls,” said Evelyn Mazzocco, Barbie’s general manager, said at the time. “Started by a female entrepreneur and mother, this brand has a responsibility to continue to honor and encourage powerful female role models who are leaving a legacy for the next generation of glass ceiling breakers.”


Singapore baggage handler jailed for swapping luggage tags

Updated 12 November 2019

Singapore baggage handler jailed for swapping luggage tags

  • Bags belonged to passengers transiting through Changi and using Singapore Airlines and its regional wing SilkAir
  • Changi handled nearly 65.6 million passengers last year

SINGAPORE: A Singaporean baggage handler has been jailed for 20 days for swapping tags on nearly 300 suitcases at the city-state’s airport, causing them to end up at wrong destinations around the world.
Tay Boon Keh, 66, had pleaded guilty to charges of swapping the tags on 286 bags at Changi Airport, one of the world’s busiest hubs.
He made the swaps between November 2016 and February 2017 out of “frustration and anger” after his request for additional staff at his work section was ignored, a district court heard.
Suitcases originally bound for various parts of the world, including Perth, Manila, Frankfurt, London and San Francisco, were affected, according to court documents.
The bags belonged to passengers transiting through Changi and using Singapore Airlines and its regional wing SilkAir.
Tay was suffering from major depressive disorder when he committed the offenses, the court heard.
But state prosecutors said evidence presented at a hearing showed his condition “did not contribute significantly to his commission of the offenses” as he continued to have control over his actions.
Prosecutor Thiam Jia Min said the swapping could have caused “potentially, even serious or fatal, consequences” as some passengers could have been left without medications.
Changi handled nearly 65.6 million passengers last year.