Concept of jihad to be made clear to younger students

Updated 06 March 2013

Concept of jihad to be made clear to younger students

In a move likely to be welcomed by parents and educationists, the Ministry of Education has decided to introduce the concept of jihad in Islamic jurisprudence textbooks at the intermediate school level.
Abdullah Al-Dukhaini, a spokesman for the Education Ministry, told Arab News that the ministry decided to move the teaching of jihad from the high school level to intermediate school because intermediate students are prepared to learn the “correct concept of jihad” before “erroneous concepts” reach them.
“Textbooks will include all relevant information on jihad including a definition when it becomes a duty, and the role of women,” Al-Dukhaini said.
“The information on jihad was developed by the Ministry’s Curriculum Development Project for intermediate-grade fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) textbooks.”
He said the government decided to introduce the subject for intermediate-level students earlier this year because it was important for young students to understand what is allowed under Islamic law.
The concept of jihad and its restrictions will be introduced in Islamic jurisprudence textbooks at the intermediate school level, according to the Ministry of Education.
Abdullah Al-Dukhaini, a spokesman for the Education Ministry, told Arab News that the ministry decided to move the teaching of jihad from the high school level to intermediate school because intermediate students are prepared to learn the “correct concept of jihad” before “erroneous concepts” reach them.
“Textbooks will include all relevant information on jihad including a definition when it becomes a duty, and the role of women,” Al-Dukhaini said. “The information on jihad was developed by the Ministry’s Curriculum Development Project for intermediate-grade fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) textbooks.”
He said the government decided to introduce the subject for intermediate-level students earlier this year because it was important for young students to understand what is allowed under Islamic law.
The focus is to introduce accurate information to help young people play a positive role in society, he added.
Curriculum is produced from multiple sources, Al-Dukhaini said.
“Saudi curriculum is prepared by experts who have specialized knowledge and is reviewed by a Shariah committee from the Board of Senior Scholars, universities and specialized colleges,” Al-Dukhaini said.
Scholars, such as Sheikh Abdullah Al-Mutlaq and Sheikh Saleh bin Saud Al-Ali, also provided their expertise.
Al-Dukhaini said the ministry wants to teach students that jihad is only permissible when defending against aggressors, and with the approval of the country’s ruler and parents.
Textbooks include a warning to pupils that the only one entitled to “raising the banner of Jihad” is the ruler and no one else. No individual Muslim or a Muslim group is permitted to do so.
“Saudi Arabia is not an aggressive country and will only get involved in conflict to defend itself,” he said.
He said the ministry welcomes public input on the matter. Curriculum is reviewed throughout the year, he added.


Saudi Arabia participates in UN Rohingya donor meeting

Updated 24 October 2020

Saudi Arabia participates in UN Rohingya donor meeting

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia participated in a UN conference for donors to the Rohingya refugee cause.

The Kingdom’s delegation to the meeting, held virtually in Geneva, was headed by the general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah.

The main aims of the conference were to ensure the provision of aid and meet the urgent humanitarian needs of the Rohingya refugees, while also stepping up initiatives to deal with health education and economic requirements and help tackle the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

An estimated $15 billion in aid has been provided by the Kingdom to refugees around the world over the past two decades, including at least 60 years of support for the Rohingya minority group.

The Kingdom hosts around 270,000 Rohingya refugees, and provides them with free health and education services, and job opportunities.