Women harassers face SR500,000 fine, 5 years

Updated 13 October 2014

Women harassers face SR500,000 fine, 5 years

Harassers may face up to five years in prison and incur a SR500,000 fine under a new draft law that is currently being studied by the Shoura Council’s Social Affairs Committee.
The move comes in the wake of increasing cases of harassment against women at workplaces, streets and malls.
The draft law proposes that anyone found guilty of making sexual advances be punished according to its articles. However, it pointed out that specialized courts would have the right to issue alternative forms of punishment.
The law considers harassment a crime since it violates an individual’s honor. The law also covers individuals and groups involved in the crime.
“The law aims at protecting honor and prestige and preventing all types of harassment,” a Shoura official said.
Badr Almotawa, a political analyst, emphasized the significance of the law, saying it would serve as a deterrent for sexual perverts.
However, he pointed out that harassment cases in the Kingdom are fewer compared to Western countries, where one case is reported per minute on average. He attributed this to people’s adherence to Islamic values.
He said the establishment of women-only work places and institutions is one solution for preventing harassment and cited the Kingdom Tower, of which the third floor is women-only, and Princess Nora University as good examples.
Almotawa also stressed the need to punish anyone found guilty of drunk driving.
“These people, who endanger their own lives and those of their families and road users, deserve tough punishment. They have caused many road crashes in Riyadh, Jeddah and other parts of the country, killing innocent people,” he said.


‘Dare to dream,’ football hero Thierry Henry tells Saudi fans

Footballing great Thierry Henry thrills fans as he signs 10 footballs on stage and tosses them to the audience. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 52 min 46 sec ago

‘Dare to dream,’ football hero Thierry Henry tells Saudi fans

  • Fans got up close and personal with the former champion during a segment called the lightning round, where Henry had to answer questions in 10 seconds

DHAHRAN: Stepping onto the Tanween stage in front of a sold-out venue full of cheering fans, footballing great Thierry Henry was quick to say how “hyped” he was to meet his Saudi supporters.
As a guest and speaker at Tanween Season, the former Arsenal striker and French international faced a busy schedule on Saturday after arriving at King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture (Ithra) in Dhahran.
First, he had a “meet and greet” with fans, many wearing Arsenal shirts, which was quickly followed by a discussion of the theme for this year’s event, “Play.”
After two young footballers from Riyadh performed a series of tricks that included balancing a football on one leg, then kicking it in the air to land on their backs, Henry said: “I would have broken my back trying to do that. It’s not easy.”
On his second visit to Saudi Arabia — the first was to Riyadh last year — Henry said that he was impressed by this year’s Tanween theme since he had seen firsthand the results of a children’s quality-of-life program at Tanween.
“What I liked most was to see the smiles on the faces of those children when I was walking around the impressive building. Being able to dream is key for me, but seeing how the youngsters were interacting, and how happy they were with their families walking around, was just priceless,” he said.
Growing up, Henry’s father played an important role in his development. The footballer did not miss a beat when answering that his father was his idol. “My dad was the hardest man to please; to put a smile on his face was the hardest thing to do,” he said.
Although the footballer grew up in a “not so great” Paris neighborhood, he considered it an enriching cultural experience. “It was great for me at the time because it allowed me to travel, although I wasn’t really traveling,” he said.
France’s colonial history meant he was exposed to different cultures early in his life.
“If I going upstairs to have couscous, to the second floor to have Senegalese food, or to eat with the Portuguese downstairs, it allowed me to travel, staying where I was,” he explained.
During his talk Henry showed that his Arabic extends to common niceties such as “shukran,” “afwan” and “alsalamau alaikum.”
Having an impact on the English Premier League and his role in Arsenal’s record-breaking era almost two decades ago are more important to him that being considered the world’s best striker, he said. As for his favorite stadium, Henry was quick to choose Highbury.
Offering advice to younger Saudis in the audience, Henry urged them to face their problems calmly and cleverly.
“Don’t run away. Face it and don’t be scared to fail. Come back again, but smarter,” he said.
Fans got up close and personal with the former champion during a segment called the lightning round, where Henry had to answer questions in 10 seconds. That revealed that he has always admired Muhammad Ali as the greatest, Messi is his current favorite football player and winning the World Cup was the most memorable moment in his career.
After the talk, Henry thrilled the crowd — a reminder of his playing days — by tossing 10 footballs to lucky fans who cheered as he left the stage.