Blackmailing by women thrives worldwide

Blackmailing by women thrives worldwide
Updated 26 October 2014

Blackmailing by women thrives worldwide

Blackmailing by women thrives worldwide

The power of social media has allowed people to blackmail others with more ease than ever before, a trend that has now become increasingly common among female groups, rather than mostly among males.
Turki Al-Shulail, the spokesman for the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice (Haia), said the majority of blackmail incidents used to be committed against women. Yet the tables have now turned, with many women becoming perpetrators against both men and women, rather than remaining victims.
Al-Shulail revealed to a local newspaper that the number of blackmail cases received by the Haia commission during the previous six months stood at 1,188 reports. The figures were revealed following the allocation of a hotline to receive such reports from across the Kingdom.
He explained that users of modern and advanced technology in all regions of the country can easily carry out blackmail right from within their own homes.
He said Haia’s role is limited to a controller body, where its powers include arresting the blackmailer and handing him, or her, over to the appropriate body of jurisdiction.
Al-Shulail confirmed that punishments and sanctions remain in the powers of these bodies, and that Haia has now established a department specializing in combating blackmail crimes. The department has been supported with financial capabilities and manpower thanks to the leadership of Sheikh Abdul Latif Al-Sheikh, head of the Haja Department.
Prof. Dr. Tariq Habib, Consultant Psychiatrist, said that “blackmail and extortion cases are not confined to our communities; rather, these are widespread in most communities throughout the world. Further, it is not something new in our society, either, and it is not the result of social networking sites as some may think”, he said. Rather, the tendency for blackmail has always been present amongst both men and women.
Wafa Al-Ajami, family consultant and lecturer in the Sociology Department at Imam Mohammad ibn Saud Islamic University, commented that females were most easily used by blackmail perpetrators to do their work for them due to their tendency to be taken for granted in both public and private life.
“This is why they fall victims of blackmails. But all of us as humans in general, and females in particular, should make a good balance between emotions and reasonable thinking, between our instincts and our needs from one side, and our faith, Islamic creed and traditions from the other side.”
She said that blackmail actions began to rise to the surface in society recently due to modern communication devices and mobiles with their high capabilities to take photos and visual and audio recordings.