Women beat up their husbands

Updated 30 October 2014

Women beat up their husbands

In a strange twist to the issue of domestic violence, reports of women beating up men have recently come to light, prompting widespread public debate. Wai center for social consultations stated that it received more than 557,000 complaints from abused men. However, Nouf, a teacher, rejected the claims.
“Women tend to avoid violence often for the sake of the children,” she said.
Abeer Okal, on the other hand, attributed male abuse to women’s backlash of enduring life-long neglect and abuse from their own families.
“When women are driven to anger, they are capable of the unthinkable,” she said.
Many believe that female violence is the result of insecurity because some husbands do not appreciate married life.
Mohammed Al-Sayyed, also a teacher, denounced this behavior, saying it is impossible to live with an abusive wife and that it is better for such couples to be separated.
Imad Al-Khouli said some women are naturally violent, saying: “A friend of mine can’t stay in the house for long hours because his wife begins abusing him in front of their children.”
Dr. Eid Al-Inizi, social consultant at Wai center, said that issues of women’s violence against men are fewer than men’s violence against women, and such cases are often witnessed when the latter have had enough that they turn to violence.
Other reasons for women becoming abusive are when husbands are unable to provide basic necessities to their families, forcing their wives to assume the responsibility or because of mental disorder among some women, Al-Inizi said, adding that some women are simply copying what they have seen their mothers doing in terms of abusing their father. If the husband drinks alcohol or has unlawful relations, he becomes even more vulnerable making it easy for her to vent out her frustration. Experts say lack of respect generating from recurring conflicts leads to escalation of abuse between men and women.
Hink Al-Otaibi, a social specialist said women’s violence can result from discovering the husband’s infidelity which makes the man ashamed of his actions, and incites the desire for revenge among women.
Sometimes violence can result from the husband’s inability to deal with his wife.


Jihad Al-Khalidi named CEO of Saudi Arabia’s Music Commission

Jihad Al-Khalidi. (SPA)
Updated 16 sec ago

Jihad Al-Khalidi named CEO of Saudi Arabia’s Music Commission

  • We will not waste time living in the past, says Saudi musician

RIYADH: Minister of Culture Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan appointed Saudi musician Jihad Al-Khalidi as CEO of the Music Commission to launch its work developing the Saudi music sector.

Al-Khalidi has more than 33 years’ experience in the field of music and was a violinist for the Egyptian Orchestra for eight years. She has a bachelor’s degree in violin playing and music theory from the Higher Institute of Music in Cairo, along with her experience and administrative knowledge.
She said that it was hard to describe her feelings, but that she was really grateful for the confidence of the Saudi minister.
She said it was a dream come true, taking on the challenge to build a new era for music in Saudi Arabia.
She told Arab News that the position is considered a fundamental cornerstone for music teaching in the country, noting that everyone agrees on the importance of the education in the first years of schooling, side by side with musical performance.
Al-Khalidi said the current musical vision is oriented toward building a musical basis for all segments of society.
“We have established music programs for children from birth to 6 years of age, children between 6 and 17 years of age, university students, music lovers and people with special needs,” said Al-Khalidi.
“What is gone is gone. We will not waste time living in the past. We are building the future of music in Saudi Arabia and developing its infrastructure, which will require combining and intensifying efforts.”
Al-Khalidi said Saudis are lucky to live in this era of support, development and advancement on all levels. “We will pick up where others left off and learn more about the means advanced countries use to overcome  obstacles,” she added.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Jihad Al-Khalidi has more than 33 years’ experience in the field of music and was a violinist for the Egyptian Orchestra for eight years.

• She has a bachelor’s degree in violin playing and music theory from the Higher Institute of Music in Cairo, along with her experience and administrative knowledge.

She said that the aim is to develop a different pattern, in conformity with Saudi and Arab customs, traditions and heritage, and in line with the visions, capacities and ambitions of Saudi society to build a musical culture in the country.
Regarding musical schools in Saudi Arabia, Al-Khalidi said one of the key steps in the next phase is to restore traditional folk music in all Saudi regions and revive the musical heritage with a touch of modernity.
“Learning music is not an easy thing. Music in Saudi Arabia will be available to everyone despite the obstacles that we will overcome with time and with the help of the media, musicians and intellectuals,” she said.
The Ministry of Culture is seeking to develop the music sector in the Kingdom and to support and encourage practitioners through the Music Commission.
It will also work with the relevant authorities to support the protection of intellectual property rights in areas related to music, in addition to holding training courses, adopting relevant professional programs and encouraging practitioners to produce and develop musical content.
The Music Commission is one of 11 new bodies launched by the Ministry of Culture to oversee cultural sectors such as films, music, fashion, heritage and arts.