Shoura panel says no to former drug addicts returning to their jobs

Updated 11 November 2014

Shoura panel says no to former drug addicts returning to their jobs

A proposal under consideration by the Shoura Council suggests the possibility of returning rehabilitated addicts to their former jobs after treatment. The security committee of the council has, however, rejected the proposal. Some members, on the other hand, quoted a survey indicating that 45 percent of current addicts are holding jobs at present.
The proposal, submitted by Shoura member Ahmad Al-Mufreh, called on the parties concerned to encourage rehabilitated addicts from both the public and private sectors to go back to their previous job once the rehabilitation program had been completed successfully.
Meanwhile, the security committee at the council stressed the need to find supportive and adequate solutions that help addicts to quit their addictions, including extending financial help to their families if they are entitled to it. However, the majority of the committee did not approve adding extra provisions to the anti-drugs system, and suggested resorting to the regulations and channels of the Ministry of Social Affairs, or amending the social insurance system to realize this goal instead.
The security committee considered the proposal submitted by Al-Mufreh as containing phrases and items unrelated to the subject matter of the anti-drug law and provisions, which itself did not include any specifications regarding the eligibility of the addict themselves, such the person's status as an employee, worker, unemployed, male, female, citizen or resident. The proposal, in comparison, included provisions that touch on the employment judgments that should apply on the affected employee, such as their retirement entitlements and subjection to guardianship if unable to act on their own. Such provisions, according to the security committee, are stated in other regulations and laws. The committee did not approve the proposal on these grounds.
Representing the minority of members from the security committee who had voted in favor of the proposal, member Abdulrahman Al-Atwi said that the proposal is very important, and that its provisions should be added to the anti-drug law, pointing to the increasing problem of drugs in the Kingdom.
The report submitted by the minority of the committee confirmed that the proportion of currently addicted persons in employment today exceed 45 percent of the total number of addicted in Saudi society. This percentage represents job categories such as doctors, officers, pilots and others. The survey indicated that 70 percent of prisoners today are detained due to drugs-related issues.


Saudi center for disease prevention signs agreement with Swedish agency

Updated 16 December 2019

Saudi center for disease prevention signs agreement with Swedish agency

  • The two parties agreed to promote and develop public health initiatives of common concern

RIYADH: The National Center for Disease Prevention and Control has signed a cooperation agreement with the Public Health Agency of Sweden.

The agreement will strengthen ties and enhance cooperation between the two countries in public health within the framework of cooperation prepared in 2019.

On behalf of the center, Dr. Abdullah Al-Gwizani, executive director-general, signed the agreement with his Swedish counterpart, Dr. Johan Carlsson.

The two parties agreed to promote and develop public health initiatives of common concern, as well as outlining the fields of work covered.

These fields included the workforce, organizational development, institutional strategy, business planning, specialized microbiology laboratories, health economics, non-communicable disease prevention, promotion of healthy lifestyles, the monitoring of communicable and non-communicable diseases, and health improvement.

Dr. Al-Gwizani said that the agreement would last for five years. It would then be reviewed and renewed after the agreement of both parties.

“These agreements reinforce the center’s role in creating new health practices and developing the performance of the public health sector,” he said. “Benefiting from well-established organizations such as the Public Health Agency of Sweden confirms our eagerness to convey the best practices to the public health sector locally, as well as exchanging experiences.”