Terror attack ‘was funded from abroad’

Updated 11 November 2014

Terror attack ‘was funded from abroad’

The alleged perpetrators of last week’s attack in Al-Dalwah in Al-Ahsa received funds from abroad just days before they carried out their operation, an informed source from the security apparatus has told Asharq Al-Awsat, a sister publication of Arab News.
The source was quoted as saying on Monday that the investigations into the bank accounts of the suspects arrested last Wednesday in Qassim showed that they had received money from foreign and domestic sources shortly before the attack.
Weapons and cash was found during the arrests on Wednesday, the source said, adding that those apprehended were part of a terror cell that was planning further attacks on Saudi soil.
The security source said that in addition to the 33 suspects, another two people had been arrested on Saturday evening in the Eastern Province, bringing the number of those arrested to 35. The source said that all those arrested so far are Saudis, and that some of them had been previously engaged in fighting in regional conflicts, while others were convicted of criminal offenses in Saudi Arabia. A few had been fugitives.
“The criminal plans of this terror cell have now been completely thwarted,” the source said, adding that its members had been able to secure lodging and funds.
Those involved were “fully aware that some of their colleagues had been involved in previous terror operations and wanted by the security services, and that by concealing them from the authorities they were putting themselves in danger.”
The source added: “The country’s security apparatus remains completely vigilant, ready to intercept with full force all those who seek to spread chaos within (Saudi) society, especially considering what is happening in countries neighboring Saudi Arabia during this period.”


Saudi photographer reveals unfamiliar tourist sites in the south of the Kingdom

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Updated 6 min 14 sec ago

Saudi photographer reveals unfamiliar tourist sites in the south of the Kingdom

  • Hassan Haroobi calls for investing in photography to develop visual culture

MAKKAH: Hassan Haroobi began taking photographs in 2013, having had a “passion for photography” since his childhood.

“I got my first camera in 2013 and the regions which I took photos of reflect the beauty of the southern region of our beloved Kingdom, especially in the Harub province in eastern Jazan, 110 kilometers away from the city,” he told Arab News.

He has taken many distinguished photos since starting out, including one of a giant moon, and the famous photo of the student that lately circulated on social media. “Nature is a divine beauty that encourages creativity and photography,” he sphaid.

Any person who loves photography seeks to capture everlasting photos to show nature to the whole world, be it plants, animals, seas, soil, water, or air, he said.

“This is why nature is like a treasure granted by God for humans to benefit, and nature is our source of living,” said Haroobi.

He added: “It is from nature that people get natural resources to procure all their needs. It is from nature that they take materials they use in their daily life. This is why life is like a big store for whatever the human needs to live, starting from his food, and ending with things that he produces and uses. The human is an important part of nature and is an extension to it.”

The first thing a photographer needs to think of before going out to take pictures is “what is the best moment to take an extraordinary picture?” he said.

“This is something that some people consider trivial, for we can take photos anytime we want. Yes, this does not contradict reality; however everything has its suitable moments so that it would be done in the best way,” he added.

He noted that photography was a widespread art. Professional photographers, or those aiming to become one, should be organized in everything they do, he said, from planning the location, preparing the camera, and ensuring enough and suitable equipment for every photo session.

As for the best time to take photos, Haroobi said the “golden hour” before sunrise or sunset is perfect, especially with for portraits and landscapes with smooth, easily controlled light.

Photography in Saudi Arabia has become available to everyone through modern mobile devices, and anybody can become a professional photographer, he said.

“Photography does not depend on the type of camera; it primarily depends on the vision and perception of the photographer on how he takes the picture, what he will focus on, and how he will shed light on a certain part while discarding other less important parts,” he said.

He pointed out that taking into consideration the basic conditions of photography rather than the camera itself would turn a picture from an ordinary one to a professional one.

“Although using a professional camera would render the photo more brilliant and professional, it would not alone produce the beauty, for it could give worse results than the mobile if the user ignores photography techniques,” said Haroobi. “Because mobiles and simple cameras are designed to make autocorrections, and it is exactly like in painting where skills lie in the painter and not the pen.”

He advised photographers of both genders not to go out and take pictures during rainy days and storms, especially in mountains, for the southern regions of the Kingdom witness difficult and possibly dangerous conditions.

The photographer also called on increasing investment in the art of photography by organizing competitions for the most beautiful pictures.