Colombo school receives IDB grant

Updated 25 November 2014

Colombo school receives IDB grant

The Islamic Development Bank (IDB) has given an outright grant of SR750,000 to set up a private school for Muslim students in Colombo, the Sri Lankan Embassy announced.
Thanking the IDB for the contribution, the country’s Ambassador Mohamed Hussein Mohamed said it would help a great deal in enabling Muslim students in Colombo to receive quality education.
The envoy said the IDB donation was in response to an appeal made by Zahira College Colombo, seeking funds to set up its branch in Maharagama, some 10 km from the city center.
Hussein Mohamed said that the IDB is an active player in promoting Muslim education in Sri Lanka.
“For the past 12 years,” he said, “it has been providing scholarships through the Colombo-based Islamic Center for deserving undergraduates who seek degrees in medicine, engineering, agriculture and other specialized fields.”
He said the IDB has offered financial assistance in the past to Arabic colleges and Muslim universities on the island.
It also has a 20 percent stake in the Amanah Bank in Colombo, he said.
Zahira College Colombo, which has been in existence for over hundred years, is a well-established school in Sri Lanka.
Under the stewardship of M. Fouzul Hameed, who took over as chairman of the board of governors in 2006, it has a well-coordinated program to improve standards of education, sports and extracurricular activities within the Islamic environment of the college, which has been carefully implemented with commendable success.
Speaking to Arab News from Colombo, Hameed said the proposed private school would be built on an eight-acre land which belongs to the collage. Stressing the need for another large private school for Muslim students, he said that there are only 19 schools for 350,000 Muslim students in the Sri Lankan capital.
He explained that 15 out of the 19 schools are not up to the required standards of education.
He said that the project, which would cost 800 million rupees, will help the community to find quality education for Muslim kids.
“The IDB grant is an encouraging token to go ahead with the project and the board of management would like to receive more funds from Muslim philanthropists to complete it as soon as possible.”


Saudi Arabia’s ‘Awdah’ initiative helps over 12,790 expats return home

Updated 04 June 2020

Saudi Arabia’s ‘Awdah’ initiative helps over 12,790 expats return home

  • Residents with exit and re-entry visas, final exit visas and individuals with visit visas are eligible for the service
  • People can register through the Absher platform

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s initiative Awdah helped 12,798 expatriates return home amid the coronavirus travel bans, state news agency SPA reported.
The program, which means return in Arabic, was launched by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to help stranded expats return to their home countries and received a total of 178,452 individual registrations between April 22 to June 3. Only those whose countries have agreed to receive them have been flown out.
Residents with exit and re-entry visas, final exit visas and individuals with visit visas are eligible for the service.
To register, a person must use the Absher platform to provide residency number, date of birth, phone number, city of departure and name of airport at home country, the report added.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Hajj and Umrah, the Ministry of Human Resources and Development, the General Authority of Civil Aviation and other governmental organizations are working together to help stranded expats return home.