3 modern prisons to accommodate 12,000 inmates

Updated 12 December 2014

3 modern prisons to accommodate 12,000 inmates

The General Directorate of Prisons said that three correctional institutions for the treatment, training and social rehabilitation of young offenders will be established in Riyadh, Jeddah and Taif to accommodate 12,000 inmates.
A report by the directorate said the two correctional institutions in Riyadh and Jeddah are pending completion of in-ground services, while about 68 percent of the construction work has been completed at Taif's reformatory.
The report said that these modern prison facilities include 96 separate units with high security measures. Units with medium security measures will accommodate 5,120 prisoners and will also provide various social activities for the inmates.
The report said that 512 inmates in units with minimum security measures will be allowed to go out of their cells without any security measures. The general hospital located within the premises of the correctional institutions will operate with a capacity of 11 beds, including an outdoor clinic, an emergency unit, an operation theater, and isolation divisions to prevent any possible epidemics, the report read.
Inmates wishing to spend some private time with their families will also be allocated 16 residential units, which include a bedroom, toilets and one kitchen, as well as a garden with toys for children.
The three correctional institutions will feature study classes for primary, middle and secondary educational levels. A number of classes will be equipped with computers and specific equipment for those who wish to continue with higher studies.
Security will be maintained using the latest security systems in prisons, with cameras, an alarm system, and fire prevention equipment, as well as social and work programs to keep the inmates busy and focused on the labor market. One of these programs will train prisoners in farming techniques and farming business and an area will be allocated for farming inside the facilities.


Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

Updated 15 September 2019

Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

  • The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen
  • ‘Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors’

BAGHDAD: Baghdad on Sunday denied any link to drone attacks on Saudi oil plants, after media speculation that the strikes were launched from Iraq despite being claimed by Yemeni rebels.
The attacks early Saturday targeted two key oil installations, causing massive fires and taking out half of the kingdom’s vast oil output.
The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war.
But the Wall Street Journal has reported that officials were investigating the possibility the attacks involved missiles launched from Iraq or Iran.
Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi on Sunday denied reports Iraqi territory “was used for drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities.”
“Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors,” he said in a statement.
“The Iraqi government will be extremely firm with whomever tries to violate the constitution.”
Iraq is home to several Iran-backed militias and paramilitary factions, placing it in an awkward situation amid rising tensions between its two main sponsors, Tehran and Washington.
United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo squarely accused Tehran of being behind Saturday’s operation, saying there was no evidence the “unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” was launched from Yemen.
Iraq has called for its territory to be spared any spillover in the standoff between the US and Iran, which has included a series of attacks on shipping in sensitive Gulf waters.
Recent raids on bases belonging to Iraqi Shiite paramilitary groups linked with Iran, attributed to Israel, sparked fears of an escalation.
There have been no military consequences so far, but the strikes have heightened divisions between pro-Tehran and pro-Washington factions in Iraq’s political class.
Baghdad has recently moved to repair ties with Saudi Arabia, a key US ally — much to Iran’s chagrin.
Riyadh recently announced a major border post on the Iraqi frontier would reopen mid-October, after being closed for almost three decades.