New law to help prisoners reintegrate into society

Updated 13 December 2014

New law to help prisoners reintegrate into society

New prison regulations may cut down five percent of the prison sentence for inmates who successfully pass a school year, or two equivalent training programs, up to a maximum of 15 percent during a prison sentence of one year or more.
The announcement was made by the head of prisons in Makkah, Col. Saleh bin Ali A-Qahtani, during the observance of "Prisoner Week" in the Gulf states, organized Thursday by the Makkah Reform Organization.
According to Al-Qahtani, the Makkah prisons department has embarked on the development of regulations and rules to enable prisoners to work outside prisons and return, as per strategies and guidelines established in partnership between the private sector and the Ministry of Labor.
According to the recommendations and regulations, prisoners should have a remaining prison sentence of at least four months, while Al-Qahtani suggested that priority should be given to inmates who are heads of family, and that the pay scale should start from SR4,000. He added that a number of private sector companies have approached the prisons in Makkah to recruit a number of inmates.
“What the Makkah prison authority is offering is only a fraction of the level of support and care provided by the Ministry of Interior and the General Directorate of Prisoners to inmates,”
Al-Qahtani said, noting the all civil and government institutions should work together to reform the rehabilitation process.
“This week's events include more than 40 activities varying from entertainment, sports, races and intellectual session to religious activities and were implemented for male and female prisoners,” the official explained.
As part of the events, children of inmates and their families had free access to the entertainment center at Makkah Mall, in addition to a free meal at any restaurant they selected from a list of famous establishments.
“The correctional, educational and rehabilitation programs for inmates receives extensive support from Interior Minister Prince Mohammed bin Naif and General Director of Prisons Maj. Gen. Ibrahim Hamzi," Al-Qahtani added.


Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

Updated 1 min 31 sec ago

Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

  • The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen
  • ‘Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors’

BAGHDAD: Baghdad on Sunday denied any link to drone attacks on Saudi oil plants, after media speculation that the strikes were launched from Iraq despite being claimed by Yemeni rebels.
The attacks early Saturday targeted two key oil installations, causing massive fires and taking out half of the kingdom’s vast oil output.
The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war.
But the Wall Street Journal has reported that officials were investigating the possibility the attacks involved missiles launched from Iraq or Iran.
Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi on Sunday denied reports Iraqi territory “was used for drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities.”
“Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors,” he said in a statement.
“The Iraqi government will be extremely firm with whomever tries to violate the constitution.”
Iraq is home to several Iran-backed militias and paramilitary factions, placing it in an awkward situation amid rising tensions between its two main sponsors, Tehran and Washington.
United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo squarely accused Tehran of being behind Saturday’s operation, saying there was no evidence the “unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” was launched from Yemen.
Iraq has called for its territory to be spared any spillover in the standoff between the US and Iran, which has included a series of attacks on shipping in sensitive Gulf waters.
Recent raids on bases belonging to Iraqi Shiite paramilitary groups linked with Iran, attributed to Israel, sparked fears of an escalation.
There have been no military consequences so far, but the strikes have heightened divisions between pro-Tehran and pro-Washington factions in Iraq’s political class.
Baghdad has recently moved to repair ties with Saudi Arabia, a key US ally — much to Iran’s chagrin.
Riyadh recently announced a major border post on the Iraqi frontier would reopen mid-October, after being closed for almost three decades.