Shoura divided on women TV anchors’ dress code

Shoura divided on women TV anchors’ dress code
Updated 01 January 2015

Shoura divided on women TV anchors’ dress code

Shoura divided on women TV anchors’ dress code

The Shoura Council was divided on Tuesday over whether to force women television presenters on Saudi-funded private channels to abide by a dress code, which includes wearing abayas and scarves.
The members had been discussing an amendment to the country’s audiovisual law proposed by Noura Al-Odwan, a woman member of the Shoura, and backed by the culture and media affairs committee. A fine of SR10,000 has been proposed for those failing to comply.
Saudi Al-Shammari said there are no regulations in place that defines the national dress for women, and to introduce this paragraph into regulations overseeing the General Commission for Audiovisual Media (GCAM) would be illegal.
Modi Al-Doghaither supported the committee’s findings to oblige anchors to wear what he termed Islamic dress. Saad Al-Baizi said the GCAM is not responsible for Saudi television and only supervises non-Saudi channels working in the Kingdom, in addition to the Internet and publications. Committee chairman Ahmad Al-Zeali withdrew this paragraph for later discussion.
The discussion comes a few weeks after Al-Odwan criticized women television presenters, saying they used too much makeup, drawing flak from some Shoura members and women television presenters.
Meanwhile, Shoura members said King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital was deteriorating. A total of 33 doctors had resigned apparently because they had not been treated properly.
Khawla Al-Krei’ said there have been mounting problems at the hospital, with 41 research projects underway costing millions, but with no proven value. Salwa Al-Hazza said the hospital produces virtually the same report every year. The last survey it had undertaken was 30 years ago.