Fodder cultivation to be banned

Updated 21 February 2015

Fodder cultivation to be banned

The Ministry of Agriculture recently announced it plans to ban cultivation of green fodder in the Kingdom and replace it with imported animal feed, local media reported, quoting well-informed sources.
The move is aimed at rationalizing water consumption and streamlining its use to other agricultural areas due to limited water sources in the country, a source from the ministry told Aleqtesadiah daily.
However, the ministry allowed farmers to change their activity and select other agricultural products, with the majority of them choosing potato plantation as an alternative.
According to the source, who preferred to remain anonymous, the decision to stop issuing licenses to cultivate green fodder came as a preliminary step to completely halting its plantation, which has slowly led to the decline of the number of fodder farmers by 12.6 percent yearly.
The economic value of the plantation is low, since its share in the agriculture sector does not exceed 8 percent. Based on the ministry’s latest data, fodder plantation area covered 195,605 hectares which produced over 3,977 tons of animal feed annually.
Despite the growing prices of imported fodder, it remains the best solution to ensure water security for the Kingdom, the source claimed.
Earlier, another source at the Ministry of Agriculture said that the ministry was seeking to adopt a national strategy for fodder for the next five years (2015-2020) on how to supply animal feed products to the Kingdom and, at the same time, on how to cope with the Kingdom’s policy to preserve water resources.


Saudi anti-graft agency probes 105 corruption cases in different sectors

Updated 08 July 2020

Saudi anti-graft agency probes 105 corruption cases in different sectors

  • A Nazaha official said the Kingdom will continue to pursue cases of misappropriation of public money
  • The cases involved fraud, bribery, and financial and professional corruption

RIYADH: The Saudi Control and Anti-Corruption Authority (Nazaha) has initiated 105 corruption cases in the health, interior, power, and education sectors.
The cases involved fraud, bribery, and financial and professional corruption.
A Nazaha official said the Kingdom will continue to pursue cases of misappropriation of public money and harming state interests.
One of the cases involves the arrest of three employees working at the Saudi Electricity Co. for receiving a bribe amounting to €535,000 ($604,570) from a French company and opening bank accounts in another country (at the request of the company) for money laundering. Another case is the arrest of a university faculty member for asking for a bribe amounting to SR80,000 ($21,328) from a number of companies working on different projects at the university.
The authority also arrested a doctor at the Ministry of Health for violating the regulations at a quarantine facility.
A brigadier general was arrested for using his official vehicle to facilitate the passage of another private vehicle through security points during the curfew period.