Shariah rule ‘sovereign Saudi right’

Updated 06 March 2015

Shariah rule ‘sovereign Saudi right’

It is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign right to implement Shariah law, said Bandar Al-Aiban, president of the Human Rights Commission.
Addressing the 28th session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on Wednesday, he said capital punishment is imposed on murderers to protect society.
“Our judicial system protects the rights of criminals and their victims,” he said. “(Since) Saudi Arabia’s rules and regulations are based on Shariah, (they) safeguard rights of all parties and ensure justice.”
Al-Aiban said under the Kingdom’s judicial system, capital punishment is awarded to “only those who commit heinous crimes that threaten security.”
He said the system is foolproof in that such verdicts are ratified by no less than 13 judges.
Al-Aiban reaffirmed Saudi Arabia’s determination to establish the highest standards of justice and ensure fair trial for all defendants. “Our judicial system conforms to international charters and agreements,” he said.
“We should not ignore the rights of those who are killed while calling for the annulment of capital punishment,” Al-Aiban told the gathering as head of the Saudi delegation.
“There are many countries that apply capital punishment in accordance with their rules and regulations and there is no international consensus on the issue,” Al-Aiban pointed out.
Organization of the Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Secretary General Iyad Madani also addressed the Geneva meeting. He urged the council to accord top priority to legislation that will help prevent religious bigotry and violence.
“We should have the courage to discuss the limit of the freedom of expression, especially when it is misused to incite religious discrimination,” the OIC chief said, while calling for an international law to prevent actions that promote hatred among the various faith communities.


Saudi, Brazil UN envoys seek to strengthen ties

Updated 07 August 2020

Saudi, Brazil UN envoys seek to strengthen ties

NEW YORK: Saudi Arabia’s permanent representative to the UN, Abdallah Al-Mouallimi, held talks through a video conference with Ronaldo Costa Filho, Brazil’s UN representative.
The meeting reviewed the bilateral relationships and cooperation between the two countries, as well as issues of common interest, global political developments and cooperation between their UN delegations.
Filho praised the Kingdom’s efforts in fighting terrorism and its cooperation with the international community, as well as the efforts of Al-Mouallimi in leading the UN Office of Counter-Terrorism (UNOCT) advisory board.
Al-Mouallimi praised the support provided by Brazil to UNOCT and its cooperation with the international community.
The meeting also discussed Saudi-Brazilian cooperation within the G20, presided by Saudi Arabia in 2020. Filho commended the Kingdom for leading the group amid the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic.