Medical error leads to girl’s permanent disability

Updated 09 October 2015

Medical error leads to girl’s permanent disability

JEDDAH: Nora Al-Askar was hospitalized at the Children’s Hospital in Hafr Al-Batin because of a high fever. Now she is in a coma with possible handicaps.

Nora, a kindergarten pupil, may now have a mental or physical disability or both. She went into a coma less than a day after being anesthetized.
Amer Al-Askar, Nora’s father, accused hospital doctors of negligence and failure to check her medical file which states that her head had had a valve implanted in it since birth. Amer made the problem clear to the doctors.
Nora’s father explained that he took his daughter from kindergarten because of her high fever. “I rushed to the Children’s Hospital in Hafr Al-Batin.”
When the doctor made a diagnosis, he put her under full anesthetic. “The next day, her condition deteriorated and she went into a coma,” her father said. He stressed that he had repeatedly told the doctors at the time of the initial diagnosis that a valve had been placed in her head at birth. “They ignored the warning and downplayed its importance,” he said.
Al-Askar says that after several days and repeated demands to transfer his daughter to a specialized hospital, she was finally accepted at King Saud Medical Complex in Riyadh, and was moved there by ambulance.
“Once in Riyadh, the specialist looked at the X-rays from Hafr Al-Batin and saw immediately that the valve was closed and that this had caused the problem,” he said.
Nora has undergone three emergency operations and is still in the intensive care unit. Her father said that the doctors informed him that she would suffer varying degrees of physical and mental disabilities.
Al-Askar held the medical treatment she had received responsible for her condition and asked that she be transferred to a specialized center for treatment outside the country.
Abdul Aziz Al-Anzi, the media spokesman for health affairs in Hafr Al-Batin, said that the patient had been put to sleep in order to receive medical treatment. “Necessary precautions were taken, according to the resources available, including providing her with a respirator to keep her safe. We sent requests to transfer Nora to a specialized hospital until she could be transferred to King Saud Hospital,” he said.
“We initiated an investigation and if negligence is proved, the case will be transferred to the medical violations committee or the Shariah Medical Committee which will decide what must be done.”


Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO makes Forbes 100 most powerful women

Updated 13 December 2019

Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO makes Forbes 100 most powerful women

Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO is named in Forbes 100 most powerful women in the world for a second time.

Rania Nashar, Samba Financial Group CEO, was ranked 97th in the list that also included 16-year-old climate change activist Greta Thunberg.

The list also included the United Arab Emirates’ Raja Easa Al-Gurg ranked at 84. The Emirati, who is a Board Member of the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry, was also featured in the list in 2017.

The top 10 in the list included German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde, who was newly appointed president of the European Central Bank.