Women candidates warned against addressing voters directly

Women candidates warned against addressing voters directly
Updated 12 October 2015

Women candidates warned against addressing voters directly

Women candidates warned against addressing voters directly

JEDDAH: Election officials have warned all 366 registered women candidates against addressing voters directly. They have asked them to appoint agents to do this on their behalf.
The officials have also directed these candidates to create separate sections for men and women at their campaign headquarters.
The officials said that violators of gender segregation rules will be fined SR10,000.
The elections will take place between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Dec. 12 with the results being announced the following day.
Judiea Al-Qahtani, the election commission spokesman, has asked all female candidates to acquire permits for their advertising campaigns, and to allocate special sections for men in their election headquarters.
He also requested them to abide by Shariah law by not mixing with men at their election headquarters. He also urged them to avoid publishing their photos in any election campaign material.
Al-Qahtani stressed that both male and female candidates who wish to present their election programs to male voters should appoint representatives or contract special companies to manage their advertising campaigns on their behalf.
“The Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs has a special section for issuing permits to companies that manage advertising campaigns for election candidates,” he said.
According to Al-Qahtani, the election commission bylaws define a number of violations that are punishable by imprisonment for up to one year or a fine of SR50,000, or both. These violations include using force or threats to obstruct election procedures or to prevent workers from performing their duties; hiding or destroying election documents or ballot boxes; buying votes or selling them, or offering gifts or money to voters; inflicting harm on election facilities or their technical apparatus; receiving funds from foreign bodies; impersonating others during the voting process; inflicting harm on the election headquarters of other candidates or their advertising campaigns.


Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
Updated 16 January 2021

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
  • It will go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority

RIYADH: Preclinical studies on the first Saudi vaccine against COVID-19 have been completed.

Professor of epidemiology Dr. Iman Almansour, who heads the team of researchers working on the vaccine at the Institute for Research and Medical Consultations (IRMC), affiliated with Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU), confirmed to Arab News on Friday that the studies were complete, and said clinical trials would begin as soon as “the proper approvals” had been given.

She did not specify when that is expected to happen.

The Ministry of Education is financing the team’s project. The team’s research paper has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmaceuticals.

The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen.

Dr. Iman Almansour, professor of epidemiology

According to the published paper, the vaccine has so far proven effective, when used on animals, in eliciting antibodies that will target the virus. “The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen,” Dr. Almansour explained.

Dr. Turki Almugaiteeb, director of Healthcare and Life Sciences at RPD Innovations, which runs the National Vaccine and Biomanufacturing Center, told Arab News: “There is a great focus on the results of medical research because of the pandemic. Research can play a great role in developing a vaccine that can be adopted and further developed in the future. We can say that the Kingdom has a strong infrastructure, which can help produce and manufacture a national vaccine.”

Both Almugaiteeb and Almansour stressed that the experimental vaccine will need to go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority.

Prof. Nasser Al-Aqeeli, the deputy minister of education for research and innovation, said the ministry supported programs at the Kingdom’s universities with more than SR500 million ($133.3 million) in 2020.