Eating while driving? Spare SR150 for fine

Updated 17 December 2015

Eating while driving? Spare SR150 for fine

RIYADH: The Traffic Directorate has announced a fine of SR150 for people caught eating or drinking beverages while driving.
The Makkah daily quoted traffic authorities as saying that eating and drinking behind the steering wheel were, alongside the use of cell phones, among the violations in the category of the driver’s preoccupation with other matters that distract focus on the road.
Traffic authorities have, in the past, launched awareness campaigns to draw people’s attention toward dangers of getting distracted while driving.
Despite deadly accidents because of such distracting activities, many drivers have not changed their ways.
According to studies, drivers lose up to 40 percent of their attention when they eat or drink and have serious issues keeping their vehicles moving straight.
Those who eat and drive increase the odds of an accident by 80 percent, said a study done by the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, released this year.
The study found out that 65 percent of near-miss accidents were caused by distracted drivers.
The figures indicate that eating or drinking while driving is more dangerous than texting.
Coffee, says the study, tops the list of the most dangerous foods and beverages.
Meanwhile, the traffic authorities have stopped the Basher system to record traffic violations. Maj. Abdullah bin Hassan Al-Zahrani, director of the Traffic Department, has notified all traffic departments in the Kingdom to stop the Basher system. This system recorded traffic violations with an electronic system to accelerate procedures.


Fahad Al-Azzam, assistant deputy minister for empowerment at the Saudi Ministry of Health

Updated 14 August 2020

Fahad Al-Azzam, assistant deputy minister for empowerment at the Saudi Ministry of Health

Fahad Al-Azzam has been the assistant deputy minister for empowerment at the Ministry of Health since September 2019.
He has also been the general manager for enterprise at the ministry’s project management office since July 2016, where he developed and implemented a standard set of project management processes and models, and built the framework and updated it to account for developments and best practices.
It was announced on Monday that Al-Azzam’s role as assistant deputy minister for empowerment has been extended for another year.
Al-Azzam obtained a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, in 2007. He studied abroad in the US, obtaining a master’s degree in engineering and technology management from the University of Bridgeport, Connecticut, in 2014.
Prior to his current position, Al-Azzam worked as a cooperative trainee at the Saudi Electricity Co. between May and October 2006.
At the Advanced Electronics Co., he worked as an assistant field service engineer between July 2007 and May 2009, and technical support and field service engineer between May 2009 and December 2010.
At the Saudi Food and Drug Authority, he worked as senior electrical engineer at their radiation safety department between January 2011 and February 2015.
He developed a safety program for exporting and importing electronics devices to and from Saudi Arabia and worked at controlling the risk resulting from the use of radiation-emitting devices. He also worked there as a project manager at their project management office between February 2015 and July 2016.